garden
gardening
gardening
garden seeds
gardening gardening gardening garden
gardening
gardening
gardening gardening

Gardening in India

Barty Phillips continues our popular series with a visit to some of the most historic and beautiful gardens in the world

The first great Indian Mogul emperor Babur (1483-1530) was descended from two noted Mongol warriors, Ghengis Kahn and Tamburlaine. He captured Samarkand at the age of 12, but was soon chased out by other warring tribes. Searching for a kingdom, Babur captured Agra and became ruler of an area that included Delhi and Jaipur. But Babur was not simply a warrior. He was also a poet and a keen gardener. He wrote in his memoirs: 'Hindustan is a country of few charms..there are no.. grapes, musk-melons or first-rate fruits, no ice or cold water.. There are no running waters in their gardens or residences.'

He therefore immediately set about creating a garden on the banks of the Jumna at Agra. This was the Ram Bagh, a remnant of which still exists (it is supposedly being restored). He called it Bagh-I-Gul afshan or 'Flower-Scattered Garden'. It was the first of many gardens created by Babur and his descendants within their palaces, forts and tombs.

The Ram Bagh was based on Babur's memories of the fourfold paradise gardens in Persia and Samarkand which were divided into quarters, representing the symbols of life. These were divided by water (the source of life) flowing in shallow channels with large tanks of water where the channels met, all flanked by flowering shrubs and clipped evergreens. There were patterned cascades to allow the water to sparkle in the sun. Persian waterwheels were used to raise the water to large tanks from which it was distributed to the channels by gravity. All Babur's descendants created gardens that followed this basic plan.

There are several Mogul gardens worth visiting in the triangle of Delhi, Agra and Jaipur, though sadly, few still have running water.

Amber Fort, established in 1592 by the Rajput Raja Man Singh I with magnificent buildings added by Jai Singh I in the 17th century. Elephants carry the visitor up to the four square garden that was once a parade ground. Within the fort are three private palaces each built around a Mogul style garden.
Akbar's Mausoleum, Sikandra, 8km NW of Agra: Akbar was Babur's grandson, the greatest and most successful builder of the Mogul empire. The tomb was designed and building started while Akbar was still alive, then modified and completed by his son and successor Jehangir. Surrounding the red brick and marble structure is a large park with deer, monkeys, peacocks and parrots. Wide stone causeways divide the area into four, each quadrant with its fountain, sunken pond, fruit trees and shrubs. Tel: 37 1230; 7am-5.15pm.
Taj Mahal, Agra: built by Shah Jahan, the fifth Mogul emperor for his wife Mumtaz Mahal. The garden has wide cross axes with broad canals, fountains and to one side generous avenues of tall trees. It is worth taking a walk here, away from the crowds. Tel: 0562 33 0496; open 6am-7.30pm.
Fatehpur Sikri, 37km west of Agra. Built by Akbar in 1571, it is a good example of a Mogul walled city with defined private and public areas in a blend of Hindu and Islamic styles. One garden remains, with its narrow water channels but the large bathing pool is empty. Open 7am-7pm.

 

 

Articles reprinted with premission from Greenfingers.com



Free Garden Catalog



 

gardening gardening



Free gardeing catalog gardening


g gardening garden seeds gardening
gardening
gardening