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  1. #1
    Hi! I have been told that my studio apartment needs a little more life in it. I think the solution is, actually put life in it! I want to brighten up my studio with indoor plants but I don't know what kind is the best, where to look for them, or how to care for them.

    Do you have any tips or suggestions? Please let me know! Talk to you soon!


  2. #2
    Join Date
    Sep 2003
    Location
    Maryland zone 7
    Posts
    3,042
    What you choose would depend on several things.* You will need to know much light you get where you want to grow your plant(s).* Would it be direct light shining into the room on the plant(s) or a bright room with no direct sun on the plant(s) or a north facing room that doesn't get very bright light?

    Do you tend to fuss with your plants and like to water alot or are you the type of person who often forgets to water?* I'm a 'forget to water' person.* :shock:

    Do you want plants for a table top, window sill or something large that sits on the floor and looks more like a tree?

    What type of look do you like (if you know) as to tropical, structured or even something light and airy?

    Once you answer those questions I can give you some ideas with pictures.

    Newt

  3. #3
    I don't get a lot of sunlight in my studio. I live at the bottom floor so, I need a plant that would thrive without a lot of sunlight. I'd like something that could be put on a table top or on the ground like a tree.

    Honestly, I'd be someone who would forget to the plants.

    So you've got a solution for me? :D

    Where do you get your ideas? I also get my ideas from HGTV aside from the internet. Their new show, Design Star, is premiering on July 22 on HGTV. 11 aspiring designers battle against each other to be the new design star. The winner gets to host his own show on HGTV.

    It's a really exciting show, fun, and I get a few tips here and there to fix up my studio!

    Here's the link: http://www.hgtv.com/designstar. I just thought I'd share this with you because I work with them.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Sep 2003
    Location
    Maryland zone 7
    Posts
    3,042
    I suppose I get most of my ideas from having grown so many houseplants and gardened for so long.* I also get ideas from tv shows and reading.*

    Here's some ideas for plants for a medium light situation.* That would be a bright room with no direct light. They can dry between waterings. These would work as floor plants.* These first two are very similar but the second one has smaller leaves.* I also find that it seems to grow slower, but that could be because I have it in a rather dark corner.

    Larger leaf:
    http://www.urbanext.uiuc.edu/housepl.../brassaia.html
    http://aggie-horticulture.tamu.edu/i...inophylla.html

    Smaller leaf:
    http://www.urbanext.uiuc.edu/housepl...chefflera.html
    http://aggie-horticulture.tamu.edu/i...rboricola.html

    There are several different varieties of Dracaena aka corn plant that will work for you. Some have all green leaves, some have subtle stripes and others have white or cream stripes.
    http://www.urbanext.uiuc.edu/housepl.../dracaena.html
    http://aggie-horticulture.tamu.edu/i...net_Craig.html
    http://aggie-horticulture.tamu.edu/i...Warneckii.html
    http://aggie-horticulture.tamu.edu/i...marginata.html


    Ficus aka fig also comes in different varieties that would work for you.* If you like the smaller leafed weeping fig, know that it can sometimes be tempermental and shed it's leaves if you move it, give it a draft, repot it or look at it wrong.* But, it's a lovely tree and I love mine.
    http://www.urbanext.uiuc.edu/housepl...pes/ficus.html
    http://aggie-horticulture.tamu.edu/i...benjamina.html

    Careful with this one if you have cats or small kids that might chew on the leaves.* Some have pretty leaf patterns.
    http://www.urbanext.uiuc.edu/housepl...fenbachia.html
    http://aggie-horticulture.tamu.edu/i...chia_Hilo.html
    http://aggie-horticulture.tamu.edu/i...opic_Snow.html
    http://aggie-horticulture.tamu.edu/i...ia_amoena.html
    http://aggie-horticulture.tamu.edu/i..._maculata.html


    For a table top these would work.* This first one also comes in a prettier version with stripes on the leaves.* The leaves fold up at night.
    http://www.urbanext.uiuc.edu/housepl...s/maranta.html
    http://aggie-horticulture.tamu.edu/i...euconeura.html

    Here's the prettier one.
    http://www.plantoftheweek.org/week205.shtml

    There are several varieties of this.* I've had mine for over 30 years.* When the vining tendrils get too long I just cut them off.* They don't like to be fussed with and seem to be able to stay rootbound for a long period of time.
    http://www.urbanext.uiuc.edu/housepl...syngonium.html
    http://aggie-horticulture.tamu.edu/i...Syngonium.html

    The Chinese evergreen can take low to medium light and, depending on the size you buy, can sit on the floor or a desk.* I've had mine for over 30 years in a very low light situation.* When it gets too tall for the space, I just cut the stalk and root it and start over again.
    http://www.urbanext.uiuc.edu/housepl...aglaonema.html
    http://aggie-horticulture.tamu.edu/i...ver_Queen.html
    http://aggie-horticulture.tamu.edu/i...ommutatum.html

    Another plant that can take low to medium light is Sansevieria.* There's a tall one called Mother in law's tongue that can sit on the floor or a desk and a short version called 'bird's nest'.* I grow both. The tall one doesn't like to be repotted often.* If you forget to water these for a month they will survive just fine!
    http://www.urbanext.uiuc.edu/housepl...nsevieria.html
    http://aggie-horticulture.tamu.edu/i...ifasciata.html
    http://aggie-horticulture.tamu.edu/i...as_Golden.html
    http://aggie-horticulture.tamu.edu/i...fas_Hahni.html

    For a low* or medium light situation that will fit on a table top or sit on the floor there's the philodendron.* There are many different ones and they are vines.
    http://www.urbanext.uiuc.edu/housepl...lodendron.html
    http://aggie-horticulture.tamu.edu/i..._scandens.html
    http://aggie-horticulture.tamu.edu/i...lodendron.html
    http://aggie-horticulture.tamu.edu/i...omesticum.html

    In case you would like to know how to repot your new treasures, this should be helpful.
    http://www.ourgardengang.com/containerpotting.htm

    Have fun shopping.
    Newt


  5. #5
    [align=left]Wow Newt thanks for all the feedback i'll have to check out some of those website and see which one fits best with my apartment. Sounds like you've been gradening for long. Just out of curiousity what tv shows do you get your ideas from ? Anything from HGTV ? [/align]

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