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  1. #1

    almond tree problem

    Our new Almond tree had blossom on then the leaves started to droop they are still green but many fell off, it is in the sun but we had two days of very heavy rain and the end s of the branches are very dark help please

    Morinja

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Sep 2003
    Location
    Maryland zone 7
    Posts
    3,042
    Hi Morinja,

    So sorry to read about this. Hopefully you have good drainage with the pot lifted up enough for the water to run through the drainage hole(s). If I remember your almond is the ornamental type (Prunus glandulosa) and does not bear nuts.

    I suspect your tree may have either:

    Phytophthora root rot or crown rot:
    http://ipm.ucdavis.edu/PMG/GARDEN/FR...chphytoph.html

    or verticillium wilt:
    http://ipm.ucdavis.edu/PMG/GARDEN/FR...illiumwil.html

    More on veriticillium wilt:
    http://cestanislaus.ucdavis.edu/files/40393.pdf

    The soil-borne fungus invades trees through the root and grows up into the water-conducting pipes (xylem) in the trunk and limbs. The fungus eventually clogs the pipes and then shoots die from lack of water. Affected limb collapse quickly and shoot tips often turn dark and curl into a characteristic “shepherds hook”.
    Here are other possible diseases of almonds on the right side of the page.
    http://ipm.ucdavis.edu/PMG/GARDEN/FRUIT/almonds.html

    You might want to prune off a small effected branch and look for the distinctive brown in the cambium layer for verticillium wilt.

    From this site with the bold as mine:
    http://www.clemson.edu/extension/hgi...f/hgic1018.pdf

    Dwarf Flowering Almond (P. glandulosa): The dwarf flowering almond is a spreading, multi-stemmed shrub that grows 4 to 5 feet tall and 3 to 4 feet wide. Its chief value is in the showy flower, which is either white or pink, single or double, and appears in midspring on old wood. It is often straggly and weak-stemmed, and subject to several insect and disease problems, especially borers. When damaged, prune to the ground in spring after flowering. It will return but will probably not flower for a year.
    You may not want to prune to the ground, but at least you know that you can. When pruning, clean your pruners between EACH cut with alcohol or a bleach solution of 1 part bleach to 10 parts water. When finsihed pruning be sure to oil your pruners so they don't rust.

    There is also something called 'lower limb dieback', a disease with symptoms similar to what you describe, but it starts in the lower limbs and is rare, at least in the US. Could that be the only place you see damage?

    From so much rain you might also see a potassium deficiency.
    http://cestanislaus.ucdavis.edu/files/40379.pdf

    Symptoms of potassium deficiency normally begin in the tops of trees but can be distributed throughout the tree when deficiencies are more severe.
    Symptoms include leaves that are often pale and smaller than normal. Leaf tips and edges burn and often roll upward like a canoe or “Viking’s prow”.
    Newt

  3. #3

    amond tree

    Hi Newt many thanks for your reply , my branches are only green to half way up then they are dark brown and the leaves are dying so I am going to cut the branches back to the green and see if it survives, the trunk looks ok so I will keep you upto date
    best wishes Morinja

  4. #4

    Unhappy almond tree

    Hi again Newt I have just cut a small branch off and had a look with a magnifying glass and I think maybe it has verticillium after looking at the sites you gave me, or maybe potassium deficiency so as it said to prune back midsummer I think I must wait I hope I can save it as this one is special to us best wishes
    Morinja

  5. #5

    almond tree

    The label on the tree is Prunus Dulcis

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Sep 2003
    Location
    Maryland zone 7
    Posts
    3,042
    Gee Morinja, I'm sorry to hear this. I know it's a special tree for you. In my searching it appears there are bitter almonds and sweet almonds. Prunun dulcis is a sweet almond.
    http://calphotos.berkeley.edu/cgi/im...=Prunus+dulcis

    I don't know if this will help, but this site says you can prune in March to April for sweet almond.
    http://westernfarmpress.com/mag/farm...pruning_steps/

    Try and prune just above the junction of two branches and clean your pruners between each cut and when you are done, just to be sure you aren't spreading anything.

    Please let me know how it's doing.
    Newt

  7. #7

    almond tree

    Hi Newt I went on to the site and I have pruned the branches right back to the green and will wait now to see what happens , again we had very heavy rain yesterday but the water has drained out of the pot so I am keeping my fingers crossed

    cleaned the pruners each cut with alcohol

    Morinja

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Sep 2003
    Location
    Maryland zone 7
    Posts
    3,042
    Morinja, glad to know you were able to prune the tree. Do you need info on pruning with where and how to make the cuts to check what you've done? I think I forgot to ask you that.

    Newt

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