Results 1 to 7 of 7

Hybrid View

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    Location
    Zone 9b I see disneyland fireworks at night
    Posts
    7

    recession gardening

    With work being slow, not only has vegetable gardening really given me something extremely rewarding to fill my time, but it is saving us a lot of money on produce and better still has lead to our family eating about 20 times the fruit and vegetables we were previously. Vegetable gardening is great, i would say I was hooked at the first sprout this season and know I have found a life long hobby. What do you think Newt?


    eieio

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Posts
    3
    I agree, every little bit helps doesnt it.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Sep 2003
    Location
    Maryland zone 7
    Posts
    3,042
    Hi Urbanol'mcnld,

    I have found gardening to become a passion over the years. Veggie gardening is rather new to me as my hubby usually does that, but it certainly can be rewarding to the budget, the health of anyone eating organically grown veggies and the health of the planet. Just think of the fuel saved by having your dinner right in your back yard or on your patio.

    One thing I've found by having a veggie garden is the need to 'do something' with all the extras that many folks have. Some folks share with family, friends and neighbors and some donate to local food banks. One of my daughters actually learned how to 'can' her leftovers. This all came at a time when she was a new single mother of 3 and was having financial difficulties. She constantly called me for guidance and help. She was fortunate enough to be living on a large piece of property so she was able to plant many fruits as well. Sadly for me, she never quite got the 'organic' passion I have, but at least she saved alot of money and developed new skills for herself and her 3 young daughters.

    Btw, my father was an electrician and I would often go to work with him on weekends for his side jobs when I was a little girl. He taught me alot and I'm always grateful for that. Hopefully work will pick up for you soon.

    Newt

  4. #4
    i want my own garden!

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Location
    Stockton, CA.
    Posts
    1
    I am going to plant a large vegetable garden with around 40 varieties of vegetable seeds I have picked out. I have plenty of land to plant them on, and I am considering a community garden to draw in people who have growing experience. The land has been used for commerical corn & alfalfa in the past. This garden is for my daughter & family who are there on the property.

    Is there any certain way to plan the placing of the vegetables? I guess vine vegetables choke out other plants, so need to be separated? Are there any vegetables that should not be planted next to one another? I guess corn & beans are high growing, so off at a border side.

    I am also going to plant in some anti-insect and rodent plants, and of course fence it in from small critters like rabbits. It seems so big as to be overwhelming, but it is well needed for her family size.

    I guess the first thing will be preparing the ground, and that will have to include what type of vegetables I have? I will have to post a list of the plant seeds I bought, and maybe I get some help in a general design. :)


    Last edited by shintao; 02-02-2010 at 12:29 AM.

  6. #6
    We have several tools and DVD's to support your interest... How to grow Vegetables, Vegetable Gardening

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    Location
    Burleson, Tx
    Posts
    24
    Good morning! I was given a book last year by my chilrdren called "Carrots love Tomotaes" and it was about campanion farming and gardening. Some plants (like the onions) inhibit other plants (like green peppers) from producing the most then can, while others foster other plants to produce. I'm going to see if I can find some "loveage" - the book says that it enhances growthe and flavor of most vegitables it is planted with. Another benificial, apparently, herb to grow amongst the other plants is basil. That appears to be true as both my transplanted basil and the cucumbers and zuchinni around it is going wild. Another thing that will help is praying over the area before you plant, and of course - give your first fruit and produde to either your local church or a church sponsored feeding center. Having your crops blessed is always a plus!!!

    Good luck - Tall...............

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •