Results 1 to 6 of 6
  1. #1

    Veggies in Containers

    I need to know what size container I should use for the following::

    Tomatoes:: Diameter::______ Depth::________ Gallons::________
    Peppers:: Diameter::______ Depth::________ Gallons::________
    Eggplants:: Diameter::______ Depth::________ Gallons::________
    Herbs:: Diameter::______ Depth::________ Gallons::________

  2. #2
    Tomatoes 12" deep 4- 5 gallons
    Peppers 8" deep, 2-5 gallons
    Eggplants 8" deep, 4-5 gallons
    Herbs - depending on variety
    Last edited by Adrien; 04-12-2009 at 06:49 AM.

  3. #3
    Read several pages, I would recommend 5 gallon bucket. Do a search on google with the phrase tomato in container.

    Backyard

  4. #4
    For herbs right now I just need Basil.
    I also heard that tomatoes should be in 15gal containers?!

    But anyways, not any container is going to be big enough...

    If you go to Morton's Horticultural Products and go to the Nursery Containers they have very cheap pots for like the 5gals for like $1- and 15gals for $2.. way cheaper than my local store. Don't know about shipping though

  5. #5
    These veggies are to be grown in large containers. With some thought to selecting bush or dwarf varieties, almost any vegetable can be adapted to growing in a pot. Vegetables that take up little space, such as carrots, radishes and lettuce, or crops that bear fruits over a long period of time, such as tomatoes and peppers, are perfect for container vegetable gardens.
    Plant a tomato, a cucumber and some parsley or chives all in a large (24-30") container. They grow well together and have the same water and sun requirements.
    Drainage: No matter what kind of container you choose for your vegetable garden, it should have holes at the base or in the bottom to permit drainage of excess water.
    Last edited by lilypotter; 07-03-2009 at 06:36 AM.

  6. #6

    Strawberry pot gardening

    This will be the second year that I've done my garden in a strawberry pot. I use a 9 hole pot.

    I put the tomatio in the top, and peas and beans on the top row. On the next row I put marigolds as a insectide for aphids on my plants. The bottom row I will probably do a couple of herbs this year. I found a bucket with a tube attached on the side close to the bottom and I water in one of the bottom holes only for the roots of the tomatoes. We get enough rain in the late spring for the tomato leaves.

    I adapted this trick of watering from my dad who when he plants a garden in rows will punch small penny nail size holes in the bottom of a gallon bucket and plant them along side a row of tomatoes and fill the bucket with the water and let it get watered and fertilized underground.

    This year I'm adding a second strawberry pot for my pepper to be on top and will add herbs to the sides and also leaf lettuce. I've done lettuce bowls with a variety of leaf lettuce for salads and its very pretty with its deep purples and various greens.

    I live in a zone 10 area and on the coast so the weather changes drastically through any growing season. My tomato last year did take some time actually bear fruit because of the weather changing, but I was one of the few to actually get a tomato that year because I watered the roots rather then the top of the ground.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •