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  1. #1
    Join Date
    May 2012
    Location
    The Great Northwest
    Posts
    6

    Apple Tree Fertilize?

    I have an apple tree that I've never fertilized, and has never been fertilized to my knowledge. Over the last 3-4 years the apples have been getting smaller and punier and pretty tiny last year. It was trimmed by a pro this last spring and a lot got whacked off (about 12-16 feet).

    I have a feeling I should fertilize it... If I should, what should I use?

    Don't laugh (too hard) but I don't have a clue to what kind it is, other than it's a "green apple tree."

  2. #2
    Join Date
    May 2012
    Location
    The Great Northwest
    Posts
    6
    Can anyone help with some guidance?

  3. #3
    From Texas AM

    Fertilization Apple trees are generally fertilized with nitrogen each year. In fact that is the only fertilizer most apple trees will need, especially if the soil pH is above 7.8. If your soil pH is between 6 and 7.5, or if your soil test indicates you need P or K, your first fertilizer application can be a 3-1-2 ratio fertilizer such as 15-5-10, otherwise just use nitrogen; usually ammonium sulfate.
    One month after planting, broadcast 1 cup of 21-0-0 over a 2-foot circle around the tree if the tree has made 6 inches of growth. Keep the fertilizer 6 inches away from the trunk and broadcast it evenly over the recommended area. In May and June following planting, broadcast another cup of 21-0-0 around the tree.
    In early spring of the second season, broadcast 1 cup of 21-0-0 fertilizer over a 3-foot circle; again avoid contact with the tree. Repeat this again in April, May, and June. In year three, use 2 cups four times and in year four, 3 cups four times. After 4 years, fertilize the trees as if they were mature.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    May 2012
    Location
    The Great Northwest
    Posts
    6
    Thanks for the detailed help, backyardgardener

  5. #5
    Hi, you may use compost for gardening since it is more natural. It may contain leaves, food residues, paper and cardboard. Natural compost is more economical than commercial ones and free from strong chemicals. -

  6. #6
    Join Date
    May 2012
    Location
    The Great Northwest
    Posts
    6
    thanks ronaldjohn

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