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  1. #1
    Guest
    [align=left]I have a unique garden that requires organic techniques.* Last winter I had grubs attack the roots of my strawberry plants.* It killed about half of them (that's how I discovered the grubs nestled in the dead main roots).* Does anyone have a solution that I can use to prevent my new plants from succumbing to the same plight?[/align]

    [align=left]Also, I have an extensive amount of nematodes resident in the soil.* I'm not sure what damage they might be doing.* I've read that Marigolds are good, but I can't find any in my town and the ones I try to start from seed aren't very successful.* Does anyone have suggestions for this situation?* I think they are affecting my root crops such as onions.* At least I see something that looks like bloated worms in some of them.[/align]

    [align=left]Here's a picture of my floating garden.* You can see more at http://powellriverbooks.blogspot.com...abel/Gardening[/align]

    [align=left]*[/align]

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Sep 2003
    Location
    Maryland zone 7
    Posts
    3,042
    Hi Drmargy,

    You certainly do have a unique garden and a gorgeous setting for it to grow in.* :)*

    There are different grubs that attack strawberries.* This site has some great info on insects that attack strawberries.* Scroll down to
    "D. Insects that injure ROOTS by chewing and boring tissues and sucking plant juices."*
    Then you can google images of each to see if you can id which you have.
    http://www.ces.ncsu.edu/depts/ent/no...s/NoteS-1.html

    There are biological methods of dealing with grubs.* Bt should work against them.* This site is for lawn grubs but it's worth looking at.* The best time to treat for grubs is in the fall.
    http://www.nysipm.cornell.edu/publications/grubs/

    Also click on 'White Grubs' here.
    http://www.ianrpubs.unl.edu/epublic/...licationId=511

    I did read about your garden and you mention that you used peat moss.* You may want to reconsider using peat and just use compost.* Peat can effect the pH of your soil, making it more acidic, it's low in nutrients, once dry is difficult to rewet and there is concern about the peat bogs.* You can read more at these sites.
    http://www.gardening.cornell.edu/fac...rgmatter/#peat
    http://www.kew.org/ksheets/peat.html#help
    http://www.wildlifetrust.org.uk/facts/peat.htm

    I think you may have onion maggots.* They are fly larvae* and are more prolific with wet springs.* Crop rotation and good sanitation is very important.* There are other organic methods you can use as well.* This site has some really helpful info on many pests, but do look at the first two entries on this page about nematodes and onion maggots.
    http://www.greenmethods.com/incl_pages/bb_other3.php

    More onion maggot info.
    http://www.organicgardening.com/feat...-9-728,00.html

    Newt





  3. #3
    Guest
    [align=left]Thanks Newt for all the good information.* I looked at the onion maggots and that's what I have.* Crop rotation is a little tricky in my small beds, but I do try to move things around a bit.* Now if only I knew if my nematodes were the good or bad kind, I am assuming bad since I didn't bring them in on purpose.* I make some compost of my own, but it isn't enough for the garden.* I'll see what I can buy instead of peat for next year to mix with my fertilizer.* -- Margy[/align]

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Sep 2003
    Location
    Maryland zone 7
    Posts
    3,042
    Margy, sorry I didn't get back to you sooner, but things got a bit hectic and your response kinda got away from me.

    I'm not sure how to tell if the nematodes you have are the good or bad kind without a soil test.* That might be helpful in your situation.* Just because you didn't bring them in doesn't mean they are bad ones.

    You mention that crop rotation is tricky in a small area and I have the same problem with a tiny veggie garden.* I often will plant my tomatoes (required by my hubby to grow yearly)* :) in pots and move them around the garden.* Something that might work for you would be to plant companion plants that repel the bad bugs or even attract the good ones.* Here's some helpful sites about companion plants.* The last site is for herbs.
    http://www.ghorganics.com/page2.html
    http://www.moonsweb.com/companions.shtml
    http://www.livingherbs.co.nz/companion.htm

    Newt






  5. #5
    Guest
    [align=left]Thanks so much Newt.* I just got back to my cabin and the garden has really taken off in the last two weeks.* We had more sunshine than rain for a change.* My lettuce is about store size and the herbs are growing all over the place.* My tomatoes still are little plants, so they probably won't bear until after we leave at the end of the month.* The strawberries are really coming back.* I am so glad.* We didn't get to the store before going to the cabin, but we had huge salads both nights.* What a wonderful way to eat.* Thanks for the links on crop rotation.* I'll give them a look and plan ahead for next year.* Thanks again for the reply. -- Margy[/align]

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Sep 2003
    Location
    Maryland zone 7
    Posts
    3,042
    Margy, you are very welcome!* I didn't give you any info about crop rotation, but I did for companion planting. *:shock:* Here's some info on crop rotation.* Look especially at page 11 at this first site as it has a simple sketch of Eliot Coleman's crop rotation and he's a guru!
    http://njaes.rutgers.edu/harmfulplan...l.asp?pokeweed
    http://www.rhs.org.uk/advice/profile...p_rotation.asp

    Newt

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