How to Grow Lysimachia

Lysimachia (lis-e-mak-e-a)

Probably from either Lysimachus, King of Thracia, or from the Greek luo, to loose, and mache, strife, hence the common name of L. vulgaris (Primulaceae). This genus, of which most species in cultivation are hardy herbaceous perennials, has some species which have long been cultivated. There are about 120 species in all from temperate and sub-tropical regions of the world, three of them being British natives. The yellow loosestrife and creeping jenny are cultivated in gardens, the latter plant making an excellent specimen for a hanging basket with its neat leaves and abundance of yellow flowers.

Species cultivated L. atropurpurea, 2 feet, purple, summer, Greece. L. clethroides, 3 feet, white, summer, foliage brightly coloured in autumn, Japan. L. ephemerum, 3 feet, white, summer, Europe. L. fortunei, 3 feet, white, summer, China and Japan. L. leschendultii, 1 foot, rose-red, summer, India, does best in light, sandy soil. L. nemorum, creeping, yellow, summer, Britain. L. nummularia, creeping jenny, yellow, summer, Britain; var. aurea. golden leaves. L. punctata (syn. L. vertieillata), 3 feet, yellow, summer, Europe. L. thyrsiflora, 3 feet, yellow, summer, north Europe. L. vulgaris, yellow loosestrife, 3 feet, yellow, summer, Britain.

Cultivation Rich moist soil is appreciated by these plants, and many species do best by the sides of pools or streams. They will tolerate some shade. The soil needed in hanging baskets or pots for L. nummularia consists of 1 part of leafmould and coconut-fibre and 1 part of sand.'The baskets should be suspended in partial shade. This plant also makes useful ground-cover under trees etc., particularly in its golden-leaved form. Propagation is by division of plants in spring or autumn.

 



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