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Lobularia maritima
( Sweet Alyssum )

Compact clumps of foliage covered with numerous rose, white, or lavender fragrant flowers literally covering the plant from spring through early fall. Leaves are lance shaped, 1 inch long. With its lovely honey fragrance, this delicate, reseeding annual is an excellent choice for borders and containers. Very nice in rock gardens and between flagstones. A perfect companion with pansies, sweet william and parsley in a container. Soil should be well-drained as soggy soil is a sure way to rot. Can be rejuvenated by shearing back: often plants brought home from the nursery have gotten too leggy in their cramped space, or time has taken its toll. Within 4 weeks, plant should be bushy and blooming again


How to Grow this Plant:


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Characteristics
Cultivar:n/a  
Family:Brassicaceae  
Size:Height: 0.17 ft. to 1 ft.
Width: 0.67 ft. to 1 ft.  
Plant Category:annuals and biennials,  
Plant Characteristics: 
Foliage Characteristics: 
Foliage Color:green,  
Flower Characteristics:fragrant,  
Flower Color:pinks, purples, whites,  
Tolerances:seashore, slope,  
Requirements
Bloomtime Range:Late Spring to Mid Fall  
USDA Hardiness Zone:undefined  
AHS Heat Zone:Not defined for this plant  
Light Range:Part Shade to Full Sun  
pH Range:5 to 7.5  
Soil Range:Some Sand to Some Clay  
Water Range:Normal to Normal  

Plant Care



Fertilizing
How-to : Fertilization for Annuals and Perennials

Annuals and perennials may be fertilized using: 1.water-soluble, quick release fertilizers; 2. temperature controlled slow-release fertilizers; or 3. organic fertilizers such as fish emulsion. Water soluble fertilizers are generally used every two weeks during the growing season or per label instructions. Controlled, slow-release fertilizers are worked into the soil ususally only once during the growing season or per label directions. For organic fertilizers such as fish emulsion, follow label directions as they may vary per product.

Light
Conditions : Full Sun

Full Sun is defined as exposure to more than 6 hours of continuous, direct sun per day.

Watering
Conditions : Moist and Well Drained

Moist and well drained means exactly what it sounds like. Soil is moist without being soggy because the texture of the soil allows excess moisture to drain away. Most plants like about 1 inch of water per week. Amending your soil with compost will help improve texture and water holding or draining capacity. A 3 inch layer of mulch will help to maintain soil moisture and studies have shown that mulched plants grow faster than non-mulched plants.

Planting
How-to : Planting and Removing Annuals

When planting annuals, begin by preparing the soil. Rototill rotted compost, soil conditioner, pulverized bark, or even builders sand into the existing soil and rake it smooth. Annuals grow quickly, so space them as recommended on plant tags. Remove plants from their containers or packs gently, being sure to keep as much soil as you can around the root ball. If the rootball is tight, loosen it a bit by gently separating white, matted roots with your fingers or a pocket knife. Plant at the same depth they were in the containers. Gently fill in around the plants, providing support but not cutting off air to the roots. Water the plants well.

Through the season, be sure to fertilize for optimal performance. Take special care to cut back or completely remove any diseased plants, as soon as you see there is a problem. At the end of the season, be sure to remove all plants and their root balls. Rake the bed well to prepare it for the next season's planting.

Problems
Pest : Slugs and Snails

Slugs and snails favor moist climates and are mollusks, not insects. They can be voracious feeders, eating just about anything that is not woody or highly scented. They may eat holes in leaves, strip entire stems, or completely devour seedlings and tender transplants, leaving behind tell-tale silvery, slimy trails.

Prevention and control: Keep your garden as clean as possible, eliminating hiding places such as leaf debris, over-turned pots, and tarps. Groundcover in shady places and heavy mulches provide protection from the elements and can be favorite hiding places. In the spring, patrol for and destroy eggs (clusters of small translucent spheres) and adults during dusk and dawn. Set out beer traps from late spring through fall.

Many chemical controls are available on the market, but can be poisonous and deadly for children and pets; take care when using them - always read the label first!

Pest : Flea Beetles

Flea Beetles are about the size of a flea and are black, bronze, or blue-black in color. They get their name from the way they jump when disturbed. Flea beetle populations are usually more severe when conditions are hot and dry. They can pose problems in the garden; they leave small holes in chewed foliage.

Prevention and control: You've heard it a thousand times, but here it is again - clean up the garden to remove places where these insects over winter. A well-watered, moist garden will not be as attractive to an egg laying mother either. Aside from handpicking, spray with a recommended insecticide. Cultivation between rows will help to destroy eggs, too.

Fungi : Downy Mildew

Downy Mildew, a fluffy white fungal growth that develops on the underside of leaves, is most common during cool, humid conditions. Foliage often discolors and is stunted.

Prevention and Control: Use disease free plants and space far enough apart so that air circulation is good. Remove and discard infected leaves or even entire plants. Use a recommended fungicide and always follow the directions on the label.

Miscellaneous
Conditions : Slope Tolerant

Slope tolerant plants are those that have a fibrous root system and are often plants that prefer good soil drainage. These plants assist in erosion control by stabilizing/holding the soil on slopes intact.

Glossary : Border Plant

A border plant is one which looks especially nice when used next to other plants in a border. Borders are different from hedges in that they are not clipped. Borders are loose and billowy, often dotted with deciduous flowering shrubs. For best effect, mass smaller plants in groups of 3, 5, 7, or 9. Larger plants may stand alone, or if room permits, group several layers of plants for a dramatic impact. Borders are nice because they define property lines and can screen out bad views and offer seasonal color. Many gardeners use the border to add year round color and interest to the garden.

Glossary : Container Plant

A plant that is considered to be a good container plant is one that does not have a tap root, but rather a more confined, fibrous root system. Plants that usually thrive in containers are slow- growing or relatively small in size. Plants are more adaptable than people give them credit for. Even large growing plants can be used in containers when they are very young, transplanted to the ground when older. Many woody ornamentals make wonderful container plants as well as annuals, perennials, vegetables, herbs, and bulbs.

Glossary : Rock Garden

A rock garden is a garden that mimics an alpine area, having dwarf conifers, low-growing sub-shrubs, perennials and ground cover. Often, the soil itself tends to be gravelly or rocky.

Glossary : Annual

An annual is any plant that completes its life cycle in one growing season.

Glossary : Fragrant

Fragrant: having fragrance.

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