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Impatiens walleriana
( Patience Plant )

Traditional flowering perennial widely grown as an annual in colder regions. Bright to dark green leaves are oval and finely-toothed, 5 inches long. Masses of dazzling white, pink, orange, red or violet flowers to 1-2 inches wide smother light green leaves throughout the summer. Ideal for brightening a shady garden or for adding color to patios. Requires shady, moist soil. The cultivars of the Blitz 2000 series bloom in white and shades of orange, pink, red and violet to 2 inches across. This series of impatatiens are tall, with multiple branches.


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Characteristics
Cultivar: Blitz 2000 Series  
Family: Balsaminaceae  
Size: Height: 1 ft. to 1.17 ft.
Width: 0.67 ft. to 0.83 ft.  
Plant Category: annuals and biennials,  
Plant Characteristics: low maintenance,  
Foliage Characteristics: medium leaves,  
Foliage Color: green,  
Flower Characteristics: showy,  
Flower Color: oranges, pinks, purples, reds, whites,  
Tolerances: heat & humidity,  
Requirements
Bloomtime Range: Early Summer to Early Fall  
USDA Hardiness Zone: 10 to 11  
AHS Heat Zone: 1 to 1  
Light Range: Shade to Part Sun  
pH Range: 4.5 to 6.5  
Soil Range: Some Sand to Some Clay  
Water Range: Moist to Moist  

Plant Care



Fertilizing
How-to : Fertilization for Annuals and Perennials

Annuals and perennials may be fertilized using: 1.water-soluble, quick release fertilizers; 2. temperature controlled slow-release fertilizers; or 3. organic fertilizers such as fish emulsion. Water soluble fertilizers are generally used every two weeks during the growing season or per label instructions. Controlled, slow-release fertilizers are worked into the soil ususally only once during the growing season or per label directions. For organic fertilizers such as fish emulsion, follow label directions as they may vary per product.

Light
Conditions : Full to Partial Shade

Full shade means there is little or no light in the growing zone. Shade can be the result of a mature stand of trees or shadows cast by a house or building. Plants that require full shade are usually susceptible to sunburn. Full shade beneath trees may pose additional problems; not only is there no light, but competition for water, nutrients and root space.

Partial shade means that an area receives filtered light, often through tall branches of an open growing tree. Root competition is usually less. Partial shade can also be achieved by locating a plant beneath an arbor or lathe-like structure. Shadier sides of a building are normally the northern or northeastern sides. These sides also tend to be a little cooler. It is not uncommon for plants that can tolerate full sun or some sun in cooler climates to require some shade in warmer climates due to stress placed on the plant from reduced moisture and excessive heat.

Watering
Conditions : Moist

Moist is defined as soil that receives regular watering to a depth of 18 inch deep, does not dry out, but does not have a drainage problem either.

Planting
How-to : Preparing Garden Beds

Use a soil testing kit to determine the acidity or alkalinity of the soil before beginning any garden bed preparation. This will help you determine which plants are best suited for your site. Check soil drainage and correct drainage where standing water remains. Clear weeds and debris from planting areas and continue to remove weeds as soon as they come up.

A week to 10 days before planting, add 2 to 4 inches of aged manure or compost and work into the planting site to improve fertility and increase water retention and drainage. If soil composition is weak, a layer of topsoil should be considered as well. No matter if your soil is sand or clay, it can be improved by adding the same thing: organic matter. The more, the better; work deep into the soil. Prepare beds to an 18 inch deep for perennials. This will seem like a tremendous amount of work now, but will greatly pay off later. Besides, this is not something that is easily done later, once plants have been established.

Problems
Miscellaneous
Glossary : Border Plant

A border plant is one which looks especially nice when used next to other plants in a border. Borders are different from hedges in that they are not clipped. Borders are loose and billowy, often dotted with deciduous flowering shrubs. For best effect, mass smaller plants in groups of 3, 5, 7, or 9. Larger plants may stand alone, or if room permits, group several layers of plants for a dramatic impact. Borders are nice because they define property lines and can screen out bad views and offer seasonal color. Many gardeners use the border to add year round color and interest to the garden.

Glossary : Mass Planting

Mass is one of the elements of design and relates directly to balance. Mass planting is defined as the grouping of three or more of the same type of plants in one area. When massing plants, keep in mind what visual effect they will have. Small properties require smaller masses where larger properties can handle larger masses or sweeps of plants.

Glossary : Annual

An annual is any plant that completes its life cycle in one growing season.

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