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Elusive leaf eating bugs

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  • #16
    I don't think you were too late.* If you have a slug problem I would think you would have found a few. We still don't know what your leaf eating pest is though.

    Hope everything went well at the vet!*

    Newt

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    • #17
      Still have not found ANY critters in the garden first mentioned. A mealy bug here or there but that is all. I am transplanting most of the plants from that garden to a different location to possibly escape the elusive critter problem, but ALSO because I think the sun is TOO hot in the afternoon in that spot. Should I put my hollyhocks back in pots for now, or just directly into a new spot in the ground? They have only been there 1 month and have not grown at all.

      What I have found in other areas of the yard:

      1) aphids and little black ants on both okra plants. (The squash and tomato plants in that same garden are fine). A friend told me they were aphids and the relationship between the ants and the aphids, but she wasn't sure the best solution.

      2) Japanese Beetles! Arghhhhh...I just happened to take a close look at my oak-leaf hydrangea*today and just about every single flower on the bush is housing a group of beetles. I dont think they have been there long as not too many of the petals have that lacy look, just a few. But OMG there are SO many beetles....none on the leaves and the leaves are not being eaten either. I assume I need to move quick on this, so any suggestions would be GREATLY APPRECIATED.

      Oh, and by the way....I found hydrangeas on a list of plants that were not likely to be eaten by Japanese Beetles. Makes no sense to me.

      Thanks in advance for any advice :) Dina

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      • #18
        I wish I had more time, but I'm leaving soon on a short trip and won't be back until Tuesday nite or Wednesday.* So, I'll make this quick.* You may need to do some googling.

        Aphids secrete a waste called honeydew.* The ants drink the honeydew and will protect the aphids.* So the generally speaking, if you see ants on your plants, trees or shrubs (with the exception of peony), look for aphids.*

        Insecticidal soap will take care of the aphids.* Spray every 7 days until gone.* I think I gave you a recipe for home made.* If not here you go.
        http://www.care2.com/greenliving/hom...idal-soap.html

        For Japanese beetle adults you can collect them or knock them off your plants into soapy water and then dispose of them.

        C ya in a few days!
        Newt

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        • #19
          Got me some insecticidal soap, got the beetles off of the hydrangea. To my dismay, I happen to look up in the crape myrtles and they are having a PARTY!!! I have 16 crape myrtles around the house. The leaves start at 10 feet high and go to 15 feet high, so plucking the beetles off would require a ladder...and Dina and ladders dont go too well together, I am rather a klutz. My question is "What would Newt do?" By the way, YES, the beetles are having a party in ALL 16 crape myrtles . This is war, but it seems like they might win. I have done some googling. Wondering about bats, or purple martins (or are they purple marlins?) Also read that I can plant certain plants like peonies to attract good bugs to rid bad bugs. Also read a little about milky spore disease, but that may be a huge project on the 10 acres (about 2 of which are not woods, and I dont even know if there are grubs there because we have done NOTHING with the lawn as of yet) And besides, doesnt the milky spore only take care of the grubs, what about all the "already flying beetles" from other peoples yards. I am up in arms over these dang beetles.* And how do I differentiate between good grubs and bad grubs? I read so much the other night that I cant remember which web site, but there was something about good grubs in the dirt. (I have it saved as a favorite)* AND.....on the beetle note, I have found these copper colored beetles in the dirt squirming around, what ARE THEY??? The only picture I could find that looked anything like them was a carrot beetle. Here is a pictureof the ones in my yard. Sorry for the long babble and million questions in one post, but I need help! And I know I can get steered in the right direction here.

          Here is a picture of the copper colored beetle:




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          • #20
            Well, looks like you found the guilty party to the chewing of the leaves.* Looks like you have either a Serica beetle or Asiatic garden beetle.* Click on the pics for different ones.

            Serica beetle
            http://bugguide.net/node/view/3306

            Asiatic garden beetle
            http://bugguide.net/node/view/4281

            You had me laughing with this one!
            "What would Newt do?"
            Newt would remove the crapes or learn to live with the damage.* You could try shaking the trees with sheets underneath to collect them.* Then dump in a large bucket of soapy water.* I know this is not what you wanted to hear.* :X* You will have this link twice as I use it again to answer your question about the adults down the page.
            http://www.planetnatural.com/site/xd...e-control.html

            The birds you are thinking of are purple martins, with a 't'.* From what I understand they eat on the fly and will eat the Japanese beetle.* They need rather specific habitat with some open space which you should have available.* Their housing needs are particular, but you can do gourds or a purple martin house.*
            http://purplemartin.org/main/mgt.html

            I've read that there is one specific manufacturer of purple martin houses that is better designed then others.* It has a divider between the openings. See how this one doesn't have any divider between the openings?* I've read that you won't have as many tenants with this type.
            http://www.duncraft.com/images/Q937V-250.jpg

            Here's free plans to build your own that look great too.
            http://www.whazsup.com/

            Bat houses are great but often can take 2 years or more before you have tenants.* Wanna build a few?
            http://www.michigandnr.com/publicati..._Mgmt/Bats.htm


            Also read that I can plant certain plants like peonies to attract good bugs to rid bad bugs.
            I don't remember ever reading about peonies attracting beneficials, but I suppose if the flowers aren't the double ones they could.* They do have a symbiotic relationship with ants.* It's the one plant where when you see ants on it, you don't need to worry or do anything.**:)* Want more links?* Here you go.* Soon you'll have to have catagories like:
            Garden - insect pests
            Garden - birds
            Garden - trees
            Garden - beneficial insects
            Garden - companion plants

            It helps to have them alphabetized which I've done with mine.
            http://www.rexresearch.com/agro/comp1.htm
            http://www.minifarmhomestead.com/gar...anionplant.htm
            http://www.drmcbug.com/beneficials.htm
            http://apps01.metrokc.gov/govlink/ha...s/goodbugs.cfm
            http://www.fbmg.com/GardeningPages/Beneficial.htm
            http://www.extension.umn.edu/project...al/winged.html
            http://www.organicgardening.com/subc...1-2-10,00.html
            http://www.pollinator.com/beneficial.htm

            Ok, I'll stop now!* :shock:*

            Also read a little about milky spore disease, but that may be a huge project on the 10 acres (about 2 of which are not woods, and I dont even know if there are grubs there because we have done NOTHING with the lawn as of yet) And besides, doesnt the milky spore only take care of the grubs, what about all the "already flying beetles" from other peoples yards.
            Milky spore would be so expensive on a property that size you'd probably need to sell some of your land to afford it.* This Cornell Univ site is great for info about grubs.* Especially read 'Got Grubs - Count to 10'.
            http://nysipm.cornell.edu/publicatio...bs/default.asp

            The adults are difficult to next to impossible to control on a property like yours.* You might want to use the bait traps away from the main gardens so they aren't brought to your flowers.
            http://www.planetnatural.com/site/xd...e-control.html

            Not to worry about rambling.* I think I got it all.* If not, lmk.* And don't stay up all night reading.* Get some rest.* That's an order!

            Newt

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            • #21
              The site on the beetles does not say how to control them. I had a suggestion today from a non-gardener....Pour the insecticidal soap down around the roots of the flowers in the garden. (Zinnias, rose bush, chrysanthemum & hollyhock). Would this work?

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              • #22
                I'm sorry, I'm really confused tonight.* Which beetles and which site?* Are you talking about the Serica or Asiatic beetle?* It would be best to know which beetle first and then you or I can search for ideas for control.*

                DO NOT POUR THE INSECTICIDAL SOAP ON THE SOIL!!* Why did they want you to do that?

                Newt

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                • #23
                  I wont pour the soap on the soil, like I said that was a suggestion from a non-gardener.

                  I think the beetles I have*are *the Serica...both links bring me to the same site, different pages. I will do a google and see what I come up with.

                  Have a Happy 4th and be careful!

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                  • #24
                    Did you find out anything about the beetles?

                    Newt

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