Gardening Terms

Provided is a long list of gardening terms to enhance your knowledge of the meaning and pronunciation of the word. Google may have redirected you to this page because the original page didn’t support their mobile format requirements. We have the meaning of the word, but you have to click on it via the alpha index on top of the page.

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A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z



Latin Pronunciation: Say-bal
Common Name: Palmetto.
Meaning: (for Italian botanist Liberatus Sabbati)
Latin Pronunciation: Sab-bay-shee-uh.

Meaning: Of or from Saba (Caribbean Island)
Latin Pronunciation: sa-BAT-ee-kus

Meaning: Of Savoy, Riviera (northwest Italy)
Latin Pronunciation: sa-BAW-dum

Meaning: Possibly commemorating Liberatus Sabbati, 18th century Italian botanist
Latin Pronunciation: sa-BAY-shee-um
Alternative Self-Pronouncing:sa-BAT-ee-um

Meaning: Of Savoy, Riviera (northwest Italy)
Latin Pronunciation: sa-BAW-duh

Meaning: Possibly commemorating Liberatus Sabbati, 18th century Italian botanist
Latin Pronunciation: sa-BAY-shee-us
Alternative Self-Pronouncing:sa-BAT-ee-us

Meaning: Grows in sandy places
Latin Pronunciation: sab-yoo-LOH-sus

Meaning: Of Savoy, Riviera (northwest Italy)
Latin Pronunciation: sa-BAW-dus

Meaning: Grows in sandy places
Latin Pronunciation: sab-yoo-LOH-suh

Meaning: Latinized form of Sabine, referring to the village or ancient people
Latin Pronunciation: sa-BY-nuh

Meaning: Named for Joseph Sabine, 19th century London lawyer, naturalist and botanist; co-founder of the Linnean Society
Latin Pronunciation: sa-bee-nee-AH-nuh

Meaning: Resembling a bag
Latin Pronunciation: sak-KAY-tuh

Latin Pronunciation: sak-kay-tus
Meaning: bag-like (saccate).

Meaning: Grows in sandy places
Latin Pronunciation: sab-yoo-LOH-sum

Meaning: Resembling a bag
Latin Pronunciation: sak-KAY-tum


saccate

Sac-shaped.


sac

A cavity or chamber; locule.

Meaning: From the Greek sakcharon, the sweet juice from sugarcane
Latin Pronunciation: sak-kar-RAY-tuh

Meaning: Referring to sugar; sugar cane genus
Latin Pronunciation: SAK-er-uh

Latin Pronunciation: sak-ar-ray-tus
Meaning: sugary(containing sugar).

Latin Pronunciation: sak-ar-riff-er-us
Meaning: sugar-bearing.

Meaning: From the Greek sakcharon, the sweet juice from sugarcane
Latin Pronunciation: sak-kar-RAY-tum

Meaning: Flowers similar to Saccharum, Sugar Cane
Latin Pronunciation: sak-ar-ee-FLOR-uh

Meaning: Flowers similar to Saccharum, Sugar Cane
Latin Pronunciation: sak-ar-ee-FLOR-um

Meaning: Flowers similar to Saccharum, Sugar Cane
Latin Pronunciation: sak-ar-ee-FLOR-us

Meaning: Sugary
Latin Pronunciation: sak-kar-EYE-nuh

Latin Pronunciation: sak-ar-rye-nus
Meaning: sugary.

Meaning: Sugary
Latin Pronunciation: sak-kar-EYE-num

Meaning: From the Greek sakcharon (the name for the sweet juice from sugarcane) and dendron (tree); old genus name for Sugar Maple (Acer genus)
Latin Pronunciation: sak-kar-oh-DEN-dron

Meaning: Sugar-like
Latin Pronunciation: sak-ar-ROH-suh

Latin Pronunciation: sak-ar-um
Meaning: sugar.

Meaning: Bearing sacks
Latin Pronunciation: SAK-ee-fer

Meaning: Bearing sacks
Latin Pronunciation: sak-EE-fer-us

Meaning: From the latin saccus (bag) and labium (lip), referring to the lip of the flower
Latin Pronunciation: sak-oh-LAY-bee-um

Meaning: Bearing sacks
Latin Pronunciation: sak-EE-fer-uh

Meaning: Bearing sacks
Latin Pronunciation: sak-EE-fer-um

Meaning: Resembling Sacchara (sugar cane genus)
Latin Pronunciation: sak-ar-OY-deez

Meaning: Named for Joseph Sadler, 19th century professor of Botany in Budapest
Latin Pronunciation: sad-LER-ee-uh

Meaning: Of or from Sakhalin Island, Japan
Latin Pronunciation: saw-kaw-lin-YEN-sis

Meaning: Named for Auguste (Augustin) Sageret, 19th century French botanist
Latin Pronunciation: sa-jer-ET-ee-a

Latin Pronunciation: saj-it-tay-tus
Meaning: arrow-like (sagittate).

Meaning: Of or from Sakhalin Island, Japan
Latin Pronunciation: saw-kaw-lin-YEN-see

Meaning: Arrow-like
Latin Pronunciation: saj-ih-TAY-lee

Meaning: Arrow-like
Latin Pronunciation: saj-ih-TAY-liss

Meaning: (fatness, as to presumed nutritive value)
Latin Pronunciation: Saj-jye-nuh
Common Name: Pearlwort.

sagittate

Shaped like an arrow- head, the basal lobes directed downward.

Latin Pronunciation: saj-it-tay-lis
Meaning: arrow-like.

Meaning: Bearing arrows
Latin Pronunciation: saj-ih-TAY-tif-er

Meaning: (arrow-like, as to leaf shape) Saj-it-tay-ree-uh
Common Name: Arrowhead.

Meaning: Arrow-shaped
Latin Pronunciation: saj-ih-TAY-tuh

Meaning: Arrow-shaped leaf
Latin Pronunciation: sag-it-ee-FOH-lee-um

Meaning: Arrow-shaped
Latin Pronunciation: saj-ih-TAY-tum

Meaning: Arrow-shaped
Latin Pronunciation: saj-ih-TAY-tus

Meaning: Bearing arrows
Latin Pronunciation: saj-ih-tay-TIF-er-um

Meaning: Bearing arrows
Latin Pronunciation: saj-ih-tay-TIF-er-uh

Latin Pronunciation: saj-it-if-foh-lee-us
Meaning: arrow-leaved.

Meaning: Arrow-shaped leaf
Latin Pronunciation: sag-it-ee-FOH-lee-uh

Meaning: ( for German discoverer Baron Walter von St. Paul)
Latin Pronunciation: Saynt Pawl-ee-uh
Common Name: African-violetMeaning: (S. ionan the).

Meaning: Possibly named for St. Pie, a French gardener
Latin Pronunciation: saint py-AH-nuh

Meaning: Of or from the Saiansk Mountains, Siberia
Latin Pronunciation: sah-yah-NEN-sis

Latin Pronunciation: sal-ik-kay-ree-us
Meaning: like the Willow (Salix).

Meaning: Of or from the Saiansk Mountains, Siberia
Latin Pronunciation: sah-yah-NEN-see

Meaning: The Salix (willow) family
Latin Pronunciation: sal-i-KAY-see-ee

Meaning: Willow-like
Latin Pronunciation: sa-lih-KAR-ee-uh

Meaning: Of or from St. Luce, Madagascar
Latin Pronunciation: saint-lu-see

Meaning: Having leaves like Salix (willow)
Latin Pronunciation: sal-iss-ih-FOH-lee-uh

Meaning: Willow-like
Latin Pronunciation: sa-lih-KAR-ee-um

Latin Pronunciation: sal-iss-if-foh-lee-us
Meaning: Willow-leaved.

Meaning: Having leaves like Salix (willow)
Latin Pronunciation: sal-iss-ih-FOH-lee-um

Meaning: Salix- (willow-) like
Latin Pronunciation: sah-lih-SEE-nuh

Meaning: Salix- (willow-) like
Latin Pronunciation: sah-lih-SEE-num

Meaning: Salt-dweller
Latin Pronunciation: sal-ih-KOH-luh

Latin Pronunciation: sal-Liss-in-us
Meaning: Willow-like.

Meaning: Like Salix (Willow genus name, meaning to spring or leap), referring to the willow-like leaves
Latin Pronunciation: sal-LIG-num

Meaning: Like Salix (Willow genus name, meaning to spring or leap), referring to the willow-like leaves
Latin Pronunciation: sal-LIG-nuh

Meaning: Resembles Salicornia, (from the Greek sal, salt and cornus, horn; referring to the hornlike branches of the saline plants)
Latin Pronunciation: sal-eye-korn-ee-OY-deez

Meaning: From the Greek sal (salt) and cornus, (horn), referring to the hornlike branches of the saline plants
Latin Pronunciation: sal-eye-KOR-nee-uh

Meaning: Like Salix (Willow genus name, meaning to spring or leap), referring to the willow-like leaves
Latin Pronunciation: sal-LIG-nus

Meaning: Growing in salty places
Latin Pronunciation: sal-LY-nuh

Meaning: Growing in salty places
Latin Pronunciation: sal-LY-num

Latin Pronunciation: sal-lye-nus
Meaning: salty.

Meaning: (the classical name)
Latin Pronunciation: Say-lix
Common Name: Willow.

salinity

Refers to an excess of salts in the soil which causes leaves to scorch and turn yellow and does great harm to many plants.

Meaning: Named for Prince Joseph Salm-Reifferscheid-Dyck, 19th century botanist and author of book on succulents
Latin Pronunciation: salm-ee-AH-na

Meaning: (tube-tongue, as to form of corolla and style)
Latin Pronunciation: Sal-pig-gloss iss
Common Name: Painted-tongueMeaning: (S. sinuata).

Meaning: From the Latin salsa (salty); plants with this name usually have a high salt tolerance
Latin Pronunciation: SAL-so-la

Meaning: From the Latin salsa (salt or salty)
Latin Pronunciation: SAL-soo-luh

Meaning: From the Greek salpinx (trumpet) and chroma (color), referring to the beautiful trumpet-shaped flowers
Latin Pronunciation: sal-pee-KRO-a

Meaning: Salted
Latin Pronunciation: SAL-suh

Meaning: Salted
Latin Pronunciation: SAL-sum

Meaning: Salted
Latin Pronunciation: SAL-sus

Meaning: Of or from Salta, a province in northern Argentina
Latin Pronunciation: sal-TEN-see

Meaning: From the Latin salvus (whole) and dura (skin)
Latin Pronunciation: sal-va-DOR-a

Meaning: Of or from Salta, a province in northern Argentina
Latin Pronunciation: sal-TEN-sis

Meaning: From the Latin, meaning saving, healing or helping
Latin Pronunciation: sal-va-TOR-iss


salver-shaped

Describes a corolla that has a slender tube abruptly expanded into a flat limb.

Meaning: (the ancient classical name)
Latin Pronunciation: Sal-vee-uh
Common Name: Sage.

salverform

Having a slender tube which expands abruptly.

Meaning: Having leaves like Salvia (genus name means saving, healing or helping); sometimes spelled salviifolia
Latin Pronunciation: sal-vee-FOH-lee-uh

Meaning: Having leaves like Salvia (genus name means saving, healing or helping); sometimes spelled salviifolium
Latin Pronunciation: sal-vee-FOH-lee-um

Meaning: Having leaves like Salvia (genus name means saving, healing or helping); sometimes spelled salvifolium
Latin Pronunciation: sal-vee-eye-FOH-lee-um

Meaning: Having leaves like Salvia (genus name means saving, healing or helping); sometimes spelled salviifolius
Latin Pronunciation: sal-vee-FOH-lee-us

Meaning: Having leaves like Salvia (genus name means saving, healing or helping); sometimes spelled salvifolius
Latin Pronunciation: sal-vee-eye-FOH-lee-us

Meaning: Having leaves like Salvia (genus name means saving, healing or helping); sometimes spelled salvifolia
Latin Pronunciation: sal-vee-eye-FOH-lee-uh

Meaning: (for Italian scholar Antonio Salvini)
Latin Pronunciation: Sal-vin-ee-uh.

Meaning: Of or from Samaipata (Bolivia), the native habitat of this cactus
Latin Pronunciation: sam-my-PAT-a-nus

Meaning: From the vernacular name of this plant
Latin Pronunciation: sah-MAN-nee-uh


samara

A dry, one- seeded, indehiscent winged fruit; a key.

Meaning: Of or from the Sambirano region of Madagascar
Latin Pronunciation: sam-bir-an-EN-see
Alternative Self-Pronouncing:sam-bir-an-EN-say


samaroid

Resembles a samara, a winged fruit.

Meaning: Having leaves like Sambucus, a genus name derived from a stringed instrument made from Elder wood
Latin Pronunciation: sam-byoo-ki-FOH-lee-um

Meaning: Of or from the Sambirano region of Madagascar
Latin Pronunciation: sam-bir-an-EN-sis

Meaning: Having leaves like Sambucus, a genus name derived from a stringed instrument made from Elder wood
Latin Pronunciation: sam-byoo-ki-FOH-lee-uh

Meaning: Having leaves like Sambucus, a genus name derived from a stringed instrument made from Elder wood
Latin Pronunciation: sam-byoo-ki-FOH-lee-us

Meaning: (classical name)
Latin Pronunciation: Sam-bew-kus
Common Name: Elder.

Latin Pronunciation: sam-bew-sye-nus
Meaning: like the Elder (Sambucus).

Meaning: Of or from the Greek island of Samos, in the Aegean Sea
Latin Pronunciation: SAM-ee-a

Meaning: Of or from the Greek island of Samos, in the Aegean Sea
Latin Pronunciation: SAM-ee-us

Meaning: Derivation is obscure
Latin Pronunciation: SAM-bak

Meaning: Of or from Samoa (Polynesian Islands in the South Pacific ocean)
Latin Pronunciation: sam-oh-EN-see

Meaning: Of or from the Greek island of Samos, in the Aegean Sea
Latin Pronunciation: SAM-ee-um


Latin Pronunciation: San-cheez-ee-uh. SanguinariaMeaning: (bloody, as to color of root juice)
Latin Pronunciation: San-gwin-nay-ree-uh
Common Name: Blood root.

Meaning: Of or from Samoa (Polynesian Islands in the South Pacific ocean)
Latin Pronunciation: sam-oh-EN-sis

Meaning: Sacred
Latin Pronunciation: SANK-tuh

Meaning: Latinized form of St. John (the Baptist), who was believed to have worn a girdle of this plant while in the wilderness
Latin Pronunciation: SANG-tee jo-HAW-nis
Alternative Self-Pronouncing:SANG-tee yo-HAW-nis

Meaning: (for American botanist Sam F. Trelease)
Latin Pronunciation: Sam-yew-ell-uh
Common Name: Date- yucca.

Latin Pronunciation: sank-tus
Meaning: holy (of sacred tradition).


sandbar (alt. sand bar)

A temporary ridge of sand formed by currents in a body of water.

Meaning: Named for Henry Frederick Conrad Sander, early 20th century German-born British nurseryman who specialized in orchids
Latin Pronunciation: SAN-der-eye

Meaning: Sacred
Latin Pronunciation: SANK-tum

Meaning: Named for John Sanderson, who discovered the plant in South Africa in 1851
Latin Pronunciation: san-der-SON-ee-uh

Meaning: Named for Henry Frederick Conrad Sander, early 20th century German-born British nurseryman who specialized in orchids
Latin Pronunciation: san-der-ee-AH-nuh

Latin Pronunciation: sand-wis-sen-siss
Meaning: of the Sandwich or Hawaiian Islands.

Meaning: Named for Sanderson
Latin Pronunciation: san-der-SON-ee-eye

Meaning: Named for Sander & Sons after their collectors sent plants from the Philippines
Latin Pronunciation: SAN-der-ay
Alternative Self-Pronouncing:SAN-der-ay-ee

Meaning: Blood red
Latin Pronunciation: san-GWIN-ee-uh

Meaning: Of or from Hawaii (the islands were named by Captain Cook in compliment to Lord Sandwich, First Lord of the Admiralty)
Latin Pronunciation: sand-wich-EN-sis

Meaning: Of or from Hawaii (the islands were named by Captain Cook in compliment to Lord Sandwich, First Lord of the Admiralty)
Latin Pronunciation: sand-wich-EN-see

Meaning: Bloody
Latin Pronunciation: san-gwin-AR-ee-uh

Meaning: Blood red flowers
Latin Pronunciation: san-gwin-ee-flor-um

Latin Pronunciation: san-gwin-ee-us
Meaning: blood-red.

Meaning: Blood red
Latin Pronunciation: san-GWIN-ee-um

Latin Pronunciation: san-gwin-nay-liss
Meaning: blood-red.

Meaning: Blood red flowers
Latin Pronunciation: san-gwin-ee-flor-us

Meaning: Blood red flowers
Latin Pronunciation: san-gwin-ee-flor-a

Meaning: Full of blood
Latin Pronunciation: san-gwin-oh-LEN-tuh


Latin Pronunciation: San-gwis-sorb-uh
Common Name: Bur-net.
Meaning: (for Italian Prince of San-seviero)
Latin Pronunciation: San-sev-veer-ee-uh
Common Name: Bow-string-hempMeaning: (known to florists and many gardeners as Snake-plant).

Meaning: Diminutive of the Latin sanare (to heal)
Latin Pronunciation: suh-NIK-uh-luh
Alternative Self-Pronouncing:suh-NIK-yoo-luh

Meaning: Named for Prince Raimond de Sansgrio de Sanseviero, 18th century patron of botanical expeditions
Latin Pronunciation: san-se-VEER-ee-uh


Latin Pronunciation: San-toh-lye-nuh
Common Name: Lavender- cottonMeaning: (S. chamaecyparissus).

Meaning: From the Greek santalon, which is derived from the Sanskrit chandana, meaning fragrant
Latin Pronunciation: SAN-tal-um

Meaning: Of or from the Santa Rita Mountains in Arizona (U.S.)
Latin Pronunciation: san-ta REE-ta

Meaning: Of or form Sangzhi, China
Latin Pronunciation: sang-zhee-EN-sis

Meaning: Pleasant taste
Latin Pronunciation: sap-EE-dum

Meaning: (for the Italian Sanvitali family)
Latin Pronunciation: San-vit-tay-lee-uh.

Latin Pronunciation: sap-id-us
Meaning: savory.

Meaning: Of wise men
Latin Pronunciation: sap-ee-EN-tum

Meaning: Pleasant taste
Latin Pronunciation: sap-EE-duh

Meaning: Of wise men
Latin Pronunciation: sap-ee-EN-tuh

Meaning: (soap-India, as to use of ber-ries for soap in India)
Latin Pronunciation: Sap-pind-us
Common Name: Soapberry.

Latin Pronunciation: sap-ee-ent-us
Meaning: pertaining to the wise.

Meaning: Ancient Latin name for a resinous pine, the sap lathers like soap
Latin Pronunciation: SAY-pee-um

Latin Pronunciation: sap-on-nay-see-us
Meaning: soapy.

Meaning: Soapy
Latin Pronunciation: sap-oh-NAIR-ee-um


saponin

A glycoside compound of plants which has a foaming or soap-like action.

Meaning: Soapy
Latin Pronunciation: sap-oh-NAIR-ee-us

Meaning: (soap, for its juice which lathers in water)
Latin Pronunciation: Sap-on-nay-ree-uh
Common Name: Soapwort.

Meaning: Having foliage like Sapota (genus name from the South American vernacular name; also spelled zapota)
Latin Pronunciation: sa-poh-tee-FOH-lee-a

Meaning: Sapphire blue
Latin Pronunciation: saf-ire-EE-nuh

Meaning: Sapphire blue
Latin Pronunciation: saf-ire-EE-nus

Meaning: From the South American vernacular name; also spelled zapota
Latin Pronunciation: suh-POH-tuh


sapropel

A gaseous product of decomposition of organic depositions on the bottom of a body of water, especially common in marshes, formed under anaerobic conditions, and with the fetid odor of rotten eggs.


sapwood

The more recently produced, outer layer of wood tissue of a tree, usually lighter in color than the heartwood.

Meaning: Sapphire blue
Latin Pronunciation: saf-ire-EE-num

Meaning: (fleshy-lip, as to flowers)
Latin Pronunciation: Sar-koh-kye-lus.

saprophyte

A plant lacking chlorophyll and living on dead organic matter.


saprophytic

Feeding from dissolved or decayed organic material, as a saprophyte.

Meaning: From the Greek sarkos (flesh) and anthos (flower), referring to its fleshy flowers
Latin Pronunciation: sar-KANTH-us

Meaning: From the Greek sarkos (flesh) and andros (gland)
Latin Pronunciation: sar-KAN-dra

Meaning: Fleshy stem
Latin Pronunciation: sar-koh-KAW-lee
Alternative Self-Pronouncing:sar-koh-KAW-lay

Meaning: Fleshy stem
Latin Pronunciation: sar-koh-KAW-liss

Meaning: From the Greek sarkos (flesh) and cheilos (lip), referring to the fleshy lip of the flower
Latin Pronunciation: sar-koh-KY-lus

Latin Pronunciation: sar-koh-deez
Meaning: fleshy, flesh- like.

Meaning: (fleshy-berry, as to fruit)
Latin Pronunciation: Sar-koh-ko k-uh.

Meaning: From the Greek sarkos (flesh) and caule (stem)
Latin Pronunciation: sar-koh-KAW-lon

Meaning: From the Greek sarx (flesh) and cornis (horn), referring to the fleshy lobes
Latin Pronunciation: sar-ko-KORN-ee-a

Meaning: Flesh leaf
Latin Pronunciation: sar-koh-FIL-us

Meaning: Flesh leaf
Latin Pronunciation: sar-koh-FIL-uh

Meaning: Flesh leaf
Latin Pronunciation: sar-koh-FIL-um

Meaning: From the Greek sarx or sarkos (flesh) and stemma (crown or wreath, garland); referring to the fleshy inner corona
Latin Pronunciation: sar-koh-STEM-uh

Meaning: Of or from Sardinia, Italy
Latin Pronunciation: sar-DOH-us

Meaning: Named for Charles Sprague Sargent, early 19th century botanist and Director of the Arnold Arboretum of Harvard University, and magazine publisher
Latin Pronunciation: sar-jen-tee-AH-na
Alternative Self-Pronouncing:sar-jen-tee-AY-na

Meaning: Named for Charles Sprague Sargent, early 19th century botanist and Director of the Arnold Arboretum of Harvard University, and magazine publisher
Latin Pronunciation: sar-jen-tee-AH-num
Alternative Self-Pronouncing:sar-jen-tee-AY-num

Meaning: Of or from Sardinia, Italy
Latin Pronunciation: sar-DOH-um

Meaning: Named for Charles Sprague Sargent, early 19th century botanist and Director of the Arnold Arboretum of Harvard University, and magazine publisher
Latin Pronunciation: sar-JEN-tee-ay

Meaning: Named for Sargent - various Sargents share this specific name
Latin Pronunciation: sar-JEN-tee-eye

Meaning: Of or from Sardinia, Italy
Latin Pronunciation: sar-DOH-a


sarmentose

With long slender stolons.

Meaning: Producing a runner
Latin Pronunciation: sar-men-TOH-suh

Meaning: Of or from the island of Sarnia (Roman name for Guernsey)
Latin Pronunciation: sarn-ee-EN-see

Latin Pronunciation: sar-men-toh-sus
Meaning: having runners.

Latin Pronunciation: sar - nee - en - siss
Meaning: of the Islands of Guernsey.

Meaning: From the Greek saron (broom) and thamnos (shrub)
Latin Pronunciation: sar-ROTH-am-nus

Meaning: Resembles Saracha, a South African genus in the Solanum family; also spelled sarachoides
Latin Pronunciation: sar-ra-KOY-deez

Meaning: From the Japanese name for this particular species, Sazanka
Latin Pronunciation: suh-SAN-kwuh

Meaning: Anagram of Asarum (ginger genus)
Latin Pronunciation: sar-OO-ma

Meaning: Producing a runner
Latin Pronunciation: sar-men-TOH-sum

Meaning: (probably named for Saxi-fraga, the Saxifrage, by Spanish dis-coverers because of similar medicinal properties)
Latin Pronunciation: Sass-uh-frass.

Meaning: Cultivated
Latin Pronunciation: sa-TEE-vum


saturation cratering

Ancient land around a volcanic area, filled with old and new craters from repeated eruptions.

Meaning: (for one D. Sarrazin)
Latin Pronunciation: Sar-ras-seen-ee-uh
Common Name: Pitcher-plant.

Meaning: From the Japanese name for this plant
Latin Pronunciation: SAS-uh

Meaning: Cultivated
Latin Pronunciation: sa-TEE-vuh

Latin Pronunciation: saw-roh-sef-al-us
Meaning: lizard-headed.

Latin Pronunciation: sat-tye-vus
Meaning: cultivated.

Meaning: (the classical name)
Latin Pronunciation: Sat-yew-reej-uh
Common Name: Savory.

Latin Pronunciation: Saw-rom-at-um. SaururusMeaning: (lizard-tail, as to shape of flower spike)
Latin Pronunciation: Saw-roor-us
Common Name: Lizards- tail.

Meaning: Named for the botanist who discovered it in South Africa in the late 1800s
Latin Pronunciation: son-DER-see-eye

Meaning: Lizard's tail
Latin Pronunciation: saw-roo-rus

Meaning: Resembles Satureja (from Latin satureia, savory)
Latin Pronunciation: sat-er-eh-OY-deez


savanna (alt. savannah)

A flat grassland of tropical and subtropical regions usually having distinct periods of dry and wet weather.

Meaning: (for Swiss naturalists Bene-dict and Theodore Saussure)
Latin Pronunciation: Soss-yew-ree-uh.

Meaning: Named for Paul Amadee Ludovic Savatier, 19th century French botanist
Latin Pronunciation: sa-va-TEER-ee

Latin Pronunciation: sak - sik - of - us
Meaning: growing among rocks.

Meaning: Found growing among rocks
Latin Pronunciation: saks-A-til-ee

Meaning: Rock-dweller
Latin Pronunciation: saks-ee-KOH-luh

Latin Pronunciation: sak-sat-il-iss
Meaning: growing among rocks.


sawflies

Larvae of various insects that feed on leaves, sometimes rolling them.

Meaning: Rock-dweller
Latin Pronunciation: saks-ee-KOH-lee

Meaning: Rock breaker
Latin Pronunciation: saks-if-FRAG-um

Meaning: The Saxifrage family (the name means rock-breaker)
Latin Pronunciation: saks-ih-frag-AY-see-ay

Meaning: (rock-break,variously thought to refer to the rock-cleft habitat of many species or to a supposed re-medial value for gallstones)
Latin Pronunciation: Sax-iff-ruh-guh
Common Name: Saxifrage, Rockfoil.

Meaning: Found among rocky mountains, referring to the Rocky Mountains in western America
Latin Pronunciation: saks-ih-MON-tah-nuh
Alternative Self-Pronouncing:saks-ih-mon-TAY-nuh

Meaning: Rock breaker
Latin Pronunciation: saks-if-FRAG-us

Meaning: Stone, rock
Latin Pronunciation: SAKS-or-um

Meaning: Found among rocky mountains, referring to the Rocky Mountains in western America
Latin Pronunciation: saks-ih-MON-tah-nus
Alternative Self-Pronouncing:saks-ih-mon-TAY-nus

Meaning: Rocky places
Latin Pronunciation: saks-OH-suh

Meaning: Rocky places
Latin Pronunciation: saks-OH-sum

Meaning: Found among rocky mountains, referring to the Rocky Mountains in western America
Latin Pronunciation: saks-ih-MON-tah-num
Alternative Self-Pronouncing:saks-ih-mon-TAY-num

Latin Pronunciation: skay-ber
Meaning: rough (scabrous).


scaberulous

Slightly scabrous.

Latin Pronunciation: sak-soh-sus
Meaning: pertaining to rocks.

Latin Pronunciation: skay-behr-im-us
Meaning: very rough.

Meaning: Having leaves like Scabiosa, which means scabies, referring to its rough leaves being a supposed cure for the disease
Latin Pronunciation: skab-ee-oh-sih-FOH-lee-um

Meaning: Having leaves like Scabiosa, which means scabies, referring to its rough leaves being a supposed cure for the disease; also spelled scabiosifolia
Latin Pronunciation: skab-ee-oh-say-FOH-lee-uh

Meaning: (itching, as to possible thera-peutic virtues of some species)
Latin Pronunciation: Skay-bee-oh-suh
Common Name: Scabious, Mourning Bride.

Meaning: Variant of scabiosaefolia; having leaves like Scabiosa, which means scabies, referring to its rough leaves being a supposed cure for the disease
Latin Pronunciation: skab-ee-oh-sih-FOH-lee-uh

Meaning: Having leaves like Scabiosa, which means scabies, referring to its rough leaves being a supposed cure for the disease
Latin Pronunciation: skab-ee-oh-sih-FOH-lee-us

Meaning: Scabies, referring to its use as a cure for the disease
Latin Pronunciation: skab-ee-OH-sum

Latin Pronunciation: skay-brell-us
Meaning: somewhat rough.


scabrid

Minutely rough.

Meaning: Scabies, referring to its use as a cure for the disease
Latin Pronunciation: skab-ee-OH-sus

Meaning: Roughened
Latin Pronunciation: SKAY-brid-a


scabridulous

Slightly rough.

Meaning: Rough
Latin Pronunciation: SKAY-bruh
Alternative Self-Pronouncing:SKAB-ruh

Meaning: Roughened
Latin Pronunciation: SKAY-brid-um

Meaning: Roughened
Latin Pronunciation: SKAY-brid-us

Meaning: Rough-leaved
Latin Pronunciation: skab-rih-FOH-lee-a

Meaning: Rough-leaved
Latin Pronunciation: skab-rih-FOH-lee-um

Meaning: Diminutive of scabra, (slightly) rough leaves
Latin Pronunciation: skay-bree-US-kew-luh
Alternative Self-Pronouncing:skab-ree-US-kul-uh

Meaning: Rough-leaved
Latin Pronunciation: skab-rih-FOH-lee-us

Meaning: Diminutive of scabra, (slightly) rough leaves
Latin Pronunciation: skay-bree-US-kew-lum
Alternative Self-Pronouncing:skab-ree-US-kul-um

Meaning: Rough
Latin Pronunciation: ska-BRO-sa

Meaning: Diminutive of scabra, (slightly) rough leaves
Latin Pronunciation: skay-bree-US-kew-lus
Alternative Self-Pronouncing:skab-ree-US-kul-us

Meaning: Rough
Latin Pronunciation: SKAY-brus
Alternative Self-Pronouncing:SKAB-rus

Meaning: Rough
Latin Pronunciation: SKAY-brum
Alternative Self-Pronouncing:SKAB-rum


scabrous (syn. scabrid)

Rough to the touch.


scaffold branches

The main side branches of a tree, especially a fruit tree.


scalariform

Having a ladder-like pattern.

Meaning: Obscure splendour
Latin Pronunciation: ska-DOKS-us


scale

1. A thin, membrane-like covering of the bud or twig base. A fine, grain-like surface material. 2. Sap-feeding insects that live under shell-like scales on stems, bark, and leaves.

Meaning: Left-handed
Latin Pronunciation: skee-VO-luh


scales

The chaff on the stems of ferns.

Meaning: Resembles Scaevola (genus name meaning left-handed)
Latin Pronunciation: skee-vo-LEE-na


scale leaves

Specialized leaves, including those covering buds or composing bulbs.


scaly

Having tiny scales attached at only one end.


scape

A peduncle rising from the ground, naked or without proper foliage, e.g., a dandelion; the leafless stem of a flower.


scandent

Climbing, but not self-supporting.

Meaning: Bearing a scape (leafless flower stalk)
Latin Pronunciation: SKAP-ih-ger

Meaning: Bearing a scape (leafless flower stalk)
Latin Pronunciation: skap-ih-GER-us

Meaning: Having many scapes (leafless flower stalks)
Latin Pronunciation: ska-POH-suh

Meaning: Bearing a scape (leafless flower stalk)
Latin Pronunciation: skap-ih-GER-uh

Latin Pronunciation: skand-enz
Meaning: climbing (scan- dent).

Meaning: Bearing a scape (leafless flower stalk)
Latin Pronunciation: skap-ih-GER-um


scapose

Bearing or resembling a scape.

Meaning: Having many scapes (leafless flower stalks)
Latin Pronunciation: ska-POH-sum

Latin Pronunciation: skay-poh-sus
Meaning: with (distinctive) stapes.


scarify (n. scarification)

To scar or nick the seed coat to enhance germination.


scarious

Thin, dry, and membranaceous, not green.


scariose

Scarious, having thin, dry, shriveled tissues.

Latin Pronunciation: skay-ree-oh-sus
Meaning: with leaflike bracts or parts.

Meaning: Refers to the thin, membranous leaves
Latin Pronunciation: scar-ee-OH-luh

Meaning: Thin, dry, shrivelled
Latin Pronunciation: ska-ree-OH-suh


scarred

Having marks where organs have fallen off, such as leaf scars on stems.

Meaning: King Gustav's sceptre, named for the 16th century Swedish king
Latin Pronunciation: SEP-trum goos-taf-ee-AH-nus

Meaning: Hurtful or wicked
Latin Pronunciation: skel-er-RAY-tuh

Meaning: From the Greek, meaning scepter or staff
Latin Pronunciation: SEP-tra

Meaning: Hurtful or wicked
Latin Pronunciation: skel-er-RAY-tus

Meaning: Named for Sebastian Schauer, 19th century botanist
Latin Pronunciation: show-ER-ee-uh

Latin Pronunciation: sept-rum
Meaning: scepter (-like).

Meaning: Named for Karl Ritter Von Scherzer, 19th century Viennese explorer in Central America
Latin Pronunciation: sher-zer-ee-AY-nuh

Meaning: From the Latin sceletus (skeleton), referring to the prominent persistent leaf veins
Latin Pronunciation: skel-EE-tee-um

Meaning: Named for Jacob Christoph Scheffler, 18th century German botanist
Latin Pronunciation: shef-LER-uh

Meaning: Named for Karl Ritter Von Scherzer, 19th century Viennese explorer in Central America
Latin Pronunciation: sher-zer-ee-AY-num

Meaning: Named for Johann Jakob Scheuchzer, 17th century Swiss naturalist who worked in the fields of botany, medicine, and paleontology
Latin Pronunciation: shoyk-ZER-ee-a

Meaning: Named for Johann Jakob Scheuchzer, 17th century Swiss naturalist who worked in the fields of botany, medicine, and paleontology
Latin Pronunciation: SHOYK-zer-ee
Alternative Self-Pronouncing:shoyk-ZAYR-ee

Meaning: Named for Christian Julius Wilhelm Schiede, 19th century plant collector in Mexico
Latin Pronunciation: skee-dee-AH-nuh

Meaning: Named for Christian Julius Wilhelm Schiede, 19th century plant collector in Mexico
Latin Pronunciation: skee-dee-AH-num

Meaning: Named for Christian Julius Wilhelm Schiede, 19th century plant collector in Mexico
Latin Pronunciation: SKEE-dee-uh

Meaning: Named for Christian Julius Wilhelm Schiede, 19th century plant collector in Mexico
Latin Pronunciation: skee-dee-AH-nus

Meaning: Named for Consul Schiller, 19th century German who first cultivated the orchid after obtaining it in Manila
Latin Pronunciation: shil-ler-ee-AY-nuh

Meaning: Named for Christian Julius Wilhelm Schiede, 19th century plant collector in Mexico
Latin Pronunciation: SKEE-dee-eye

Meaning: Named for Victor F?lix Schiffner, 20th century French botanist
Latin Pronunciation: SHIF-ner-ee

Meaning: (old name for Mastic-tree, as to its resinous quality)
Latin Pronunciation: Skye-nus.

Meaning: Derivation is obscure; possibly from the Greek skiasma (shadow or shelter)
Latin Pronunciation: SKEE-ma
Alternative Self-Pronouncing:SKIM-a

Meaning: Named for Hans Schinz, 20th century Swiss botanist who toured South Africa
Latin Pronunciation: shintz-ee-AY-num

Meaning: (parting-tongue, as to the early falling of the spathe)
Latin Pronunciation: Siz-mat-oh-glott-iss.
Meaning: (cleavage-anther, as to cleft anthers)
Latin Pronunciation: Skiss-and-ruh.

Meaning: Very divided
Latin Pronunciation: skiz-TOH-suh
Alternative Self-Pronouncing:shis-TOH-suh

Meaning: Very divided
Latin Pronunciation: skiz-TOH-sum
Alternative Self-Pronouncing:shis-TOH-sum

Meaning: Of or from Shipka Pass, Bulgaria
Latin Pronunciation: ship-kay-EN-sis

Latin Pronunciation: shiss-toh-sus
Meaning: readily divided.


Latin Pronunciation: Skiv-er-rek-ee-uh.

Meaning: Split chaff
Latin Pronunciation: ski-za-KRY-ee-um
Alternative Self-Pronouncing:shi-za-KRY-ee-um

Meaning: From the Greek schizo (split) and and achne (chaff), referring to the two-cleft lip of the lemma
Latin Pronunciation: ski-ZAK-nee
Alternative Self-Pronouncing:shi-ZAK-nee


schizocarp

A fruit that splits between carpels into one- seeded portions or lobes.

Meaning: (Schizobasis-like, an un-important similarity)
Latin Pronunciation: Skye - zoh - bas-ops-iss.
Meaning: (split-thorn)
Latin Pronunciation: Skye-zoh-sent-ron.
Meaning: (split-flower, as to the cleft corolla)
Latin Pronunciation: Skye-zanth-us
Common Name: Butterfly- flower.
Meaning: (split, as to fronds)
Latin Pronunciation: Skye-zee-uh
Common Name: Curly-grass-fern.

Meaning: Split lip
Latin Pronunciation: skitz-oh-KY-la

Meaning: Split petals
Latin Pronunciation: ski-zo-pe-TAY-luh
Alternative Self-Pronouncing:shi-zo-PET-uh-luh

Meaning: From the Greek schizo (to divide) and lobos (pod), referring to the thin inner coating splitting away from the outer coat
Latin Pronunciation: ski-zo-LOH-bee-um
Alternative Self-Pronouncing:shi-zo-LOH-bee-um

Latin Pronunciation: skye-zoh-pet-al-us
Meaning: cut- petaled.

Meaning: (cut-wall, as to split-ting of capsules)
Latin Pronunciation: Skye-zoh-frag-muh.
Meaning: (cut-petals)
Latin Pronunciation: Skye-zoh-pet-al-on.

Meaning: Split petals
Latin Pronunciation: ski-zo-PET-al-lum
Alternative Self-Pronouncing:shi-zo-PET-al-lum

Meaning: (cut-style, as to threadlike style segments)
Latin Pronunciation: Skye-zoss-til-iss
Common Name: Crimson Flag, Kafir-lily.

Latin Pronunciation: skye-zoh-fill-us
Meaning: cut- leaved.

Meaning: Divided or cleft leaf
Latin Pronunciation: skits-oh-FIL-um

Meaning: Divided or cleft leaf
Latin Pronunciation: skits-oh-FIL-uh

Meaning: Named for Diederich Franz Leon von Schlechtendal, 19th century German botanist and "Aufseher der ?ffentlichen" (supervisor of the public collection of herbs)
Latin Pronunciation: shlek-ten-DAL-ee-eye

Meaning: Named after a Schmidt, but not sure which one
Latin Pronunciation: shmit-ee-AH-nuh

Meaning: Named for Friedrich Richard Rudolf Schlechter, 20th century botanist
Latin Pronunciation: SCHLEK-ter-eye

Meaning: Named for Baron Alexander von Schlippenbach, 19th century Russian naval officer, who collected plants in Korea
Latin Pronunciation: shlip-pen-BAH-kee-eye

Meaning: Named for Selmar Schonland (Schoenland), 20th century distinguished botanist in South Africa, where the Rhodes University herbarium and botany department are named in his honour
Latin Pronunciation: skon-LAND-ee-eye

Meaning: From the Greek schoinos (rush, reed) and caulos (stem)
Latin Pronunciation: skee-no-KAW-lon

Latin Pronunciation: skee-nanth-us
Meaning: reed- flowered.

Meaning: (for one Friedrich Schlumberger)
Latin Pronunciation: Schlum-ber-jeer-ee-uh.

Meaning: Rush leek
Latin Pronunciation: skee-no-PRAY-zum
Alternative Self-Pronouncing:sko-en-no-PRAY-sum

Meaning: Plaited or twisted rush
Latin Pronunciation: skee-no-PLEK-tus

Meaning: Rush leek
Latin Pronunciation: sko-en-PRAY-zuh
Alternative Self-Pronouncing:show-en-PRAY-suh

Latin Pronunciation: skee - noh - pray - sus
Meaning: reed-like.

Meaning: (for naturalist Robert H. Schomburgk)
Latin Pronunciation: Shom-burg-kee-uh.

Latin Pronunciation: skol-lay-riss
Meaning: pertaining to a school.

Meaning: Named for Richard Schomburgk, 19th century Australian botanist
Latin Pronunciation: shom-BERG-kee-eye

Meaning: From the Greek schoinos (rush, reed)
Latin Pronunciation: SKEE-nus

Meaning: Named for Ernst Max Schottky
Latin Pronunciation: shot-key-AH-na

Meaning: Named for Selmar Schonland, 20th century distinguished botanist in South Africa, where the Rhodes University herbarium and botany department are named in his honour
Latin Pronunciation: skon-LAND-ee-eye

Meaning: Named for Johann Christian Daniel von Schreber, 18th century German botanist and student of Linnaeus
Latin Pronunciation: shre-BER-ee

Meaning: Named for Franz von Paula von Schrank, 19th century German botanist and professor at Munich
Latin Pronunciation: SHRANK-ee-uh

Meaning: (for botanical traveler Richard Schot)
Latin Pronunciation: Shot-ee-uh.

Meaning: Named for Arthur Carl Victor Schott, 19th century German-born naturalist on the Mexican boundary survey
Latin Pronunciation: SHOT-ee-eye

Meaning: Named for Gotthilf Heinrich von Schubert, 19th century German doctor, naturalist and plant collector
Latin Pronunciation: schoo-BER-tee-uh

Meaning: Named for Dr. Karl Moritz Schumann, 19th century German botanist, and founder of the German Cactus Society
Latin Pronunciation: shoo-mahn-ee-AH-na

Meaning: Named for Dr. Karl Moritz Schumann, 19th century German botanist, and founder of the German Cactus Society
Latin Pronunciation: shoo-mahn-ee-AH-nus

Meaning: Named for Dr. Karl Moritz Schumann, 19th century German botanist, and founder of the German Cactus Society
Latin Pronunciation: shoo-MAHN-ee-a

Meaning: Named for Christian Georg Schwalbe, 18th century botanical writer
Latin Pronunciation: SHWOL-bee-uh

Meaning: Named for Dr. Karl Moritz Schumann, 19th century German botanist, and founder of the German Cactus Society
Latin Pronunciation: shoo-mahn-ee-AH-num

Meaning: Named for Friedrich (Fritz) Schwarz, 20th century cactus collector
Latin Pronunciation: SHWARZ-ee-eye

Meaning: Named for Dr. Martin Heinrich Gustav Schwantes, 20th century German botanist specializing in Mesembs
Latin Pronunciation: shwan-TEZ-ee-eye


Latin Pronunciation: Shwan-tee-shee-uh. SciadopitysMeaning: (shade-Pine, as to its foliage habit)
Latin Pronunciation: Sye-ad-dop-it-iss
Common Name: Umbrella-pine.

Meaning: Named for Dr. Karl Moritz Schumann, 19th century German botanist, and founder of the German Cactus Society
Latin Pronunciation: shoo-MAHN-ee-eye

Meaning: (the classical name)
Latin Pronunciation: Sill-uh
Common Name: Squill.

Meaning: From the Greek skias (umbel) and pitys (pine or fir tree); referring to the needles' resemblance to the ribs of an umbrella or parasol
Latin Pronunciation: sigh-uh-DOP-ih-tiss


scientific name (syn. botanical name, syn. technical name)

The name applied to a plant, animal, or other organism, according to the Codes of Nomenclature. Although in some cases a scientific name is changed; it is almost always a much more reliable manner of identifying a plant than the often variable common name. See also: binomial.

Latin Pronunciation: sil-loy-deez
Meaning: Squill (Scilla)- like.


Latin Pronunciation: Sin-dap-sus
Common Name: Ivy-arum. SclerocactusMeaning: (hard-Cactus)
Latin Pronunciation: Skleer-oh-kak-tus.

Meaning: Gleams, sparkles
Latin Pronunciation: skin-till-ee-ans
Alternative Self-Pronouncing:sin-till-ee-ans


scion

A cutting from the upper portion of a plant that is grafted onto the rootstock of another plant, usually a related species.

Meaning: Named for Gotthilf Heinrich von Schubert, 19th century German doctor, naturalist and plant collector
Latin Pronunciation: shoo-BER-tee-eye


scion wood

Shoots from which graft scions are cut.

Meaning: Referring to the Bullrush genus
Latin Pronunciation: skir-POI-deez

Meaning: Like Scirpus (Rush genus)
Latin Pronunciation: sir-POI-dee-uh
Alternative Self-Pronouncing:skir-POI-dee-uh

Meaning: Like Scirpus (Rush genus)
Latin Pronunciation: sir-POI-dee-um
Alternative Self-Pronouncing:skir-POI-dee-um


scion rooting

Covering a low graft with soil so that the plant develops roots directly from both the rootstock and the scion.

Meaning: Clear
Latin Pronunciation: SKLAR-ee-uh

Meaning: Like Scirpus (Rush genus)
Latin Pronunciation: sir-POI-dee-us
Alternative Self-Pronouncing:skir-POI-dee-us

Meaning: From the Latin name for a rush or bull rush
Latin Pronunciation: SIR-pus
Alternative Self-Pronouncing:SKIR-pus

Meaning: From the Greek skleros (hard) and anthos (flower), referring to the hardened flower
Latin Pronunciation: skle-RAN-thus

Meaning: Named for Jean-Pierre Sclavo, 21st century French student of cycads
Latin Pronunciation: skla-VOY-ee

Meaning: From the Greek skleros (hard) and chloe (grass), referring to the tough, leathery glumes and lemmas
Latin Pronunciation: skler-oh-KLOH-a


sclerenchyma (adj. sclerenchymatous)

Tissue composed of cells with thickened and hardened walls.

Meaning: From the Greek skleros (hard, referring to the stony nutlet
Latin Pronunciation: SKLER-ee-a

Meaning: From the Greek skleros (hard) and cactus
Latin Pronunciation: skler-oh-KAK-tus


sclerenchyma (adj. sclerenchymatous)

Tissue composed of cells with thickened and hardened walls.


sclereid

A variably shaped sclerenchymatous cell of a higher plant.

Meaning: Named after a Schultz, but not sure which one
Latin Pronunciation: SHULT-zee-eye

Meaning: From the Greek skleros (hard) and chiton (tunic or covering)
Latin Pronunciation: skler-oh-KY-ton

Latin Pronunciation: sklehr-oh-karp-us
Meaning: hard- fruited.


scleromorph

A plant with leaves and/or stems that are hard, usually having a thick cuticle. See also: xeromorph.


sclerophyll

A woody plant with small, leathery, evergreen leaves and generally found in hot, dry climates. See also: chaparral, fynbos.

Meaning: Hard-leaf
Latin Pronunciation: skler-oh-FIL-a


sclerophyllous

Having leaves stiffened by sclerenchyma.

Meaning: Hard-leaf
Latin Pronunciation: skler-oh-FIL-um

Latin Pronunciation: sklehr-oh-fin-us
Meaning: hard- leaved.

Meaning: From the Greek skleros (hard) and pogon (beard), referring to the hard awns
Latin Pronunciation: skler-oh-POH-gon


sclerotium

A dense mass of filaments comprising the dormant phase of certain fungi.

Meaning: Like a centipede
Latin Pronunciation: skol-oh-PEND-ree-uh

Meaning: Having leaves like scolopendrium (centipede-like; used as the species name for Hart's Tongue Fern), occasionally spelled scolopendriifolia
Latin Pronunciation: skol-oh-pend-ree-FOH-lee-uh

Meaning: Having leaves like scolopendrium (centipede-like; used as the species name for Hart's Tongue Fern)
Latin Pronunciation: skol-oh-pend-ree-FOH-lee-um

Meaning: Having leaves like scolopendrium (centipede-like; used as the species name for Hart's Tongue Fern)
Latin Pronunciation: skol-oh-pend-ree-FOH-lee-us

Meaning: Variant spelling of scolopendrifolia, having leaves like scolopendrium (centipede-like; used as the species name for Hart's Tongue Fern)
Latin Pronunciation: skol-oh-pend-ree-FOH-lee-uh

Meaning: Like a centipede
Latin Pronunciation: skol-oh-PEND-ree-um

Meaning: From the Greek scolymus (pointed, having spines) and kephale (head)
Latin Pronunciation: skol-ee-mo-SEF-uh-luh
Alternative Self-Pronouncing:skol-ee-mo-KEF-uh-luh

Meaning: From the Greek scolymus (pointed, having spines) and kephale (head)
Latin Pronunciation: skol-ee-mo-SEF-uh-lus
Alternative Self-Pronouncing:skol-ee-mo-KEF-uh-lus

Meaning: Like a centipede
Latin Pronunciation: skol-oh-PEND-ree-us

Meaning: Resembling Scolymus (genus name meaning pointed or having spines)
Latin Pronunciation: skol-ee-MOY-deez

Meaning: (a kind of Thistle)
Latin Pronunciation: Skoll-im-us
Common Name: Golden Thistle, Spanish Oy-ster-plant.

scoop shovel

A shovel with a very large blade, often made of thin light-weight metal or plastic, used for moving large amounts of crops such as ear corn, or clearing water.

Meaning: Like a broom
Latin Pronunciation: sko-PAIR-ee-uh

Meaning: Like a broom
Latin Pronunciation: sko-PAIR-ee-um

Latin Pronunciation: skop-pay-ree-us
Meaning: Broom- like.

Meaning: Named for Janez Anton Scopoli, 18th century natural historian and physician
Latin Pronunciation: sko-PO-lee-uh

Meaning: Grows on cliffs
Latin Pronunciation: skop-oo-LOR-ee

Latin Pronunciation: skop - yew - loh - rum
Meaning: of rocky places.


scorch

The drying and browning of leaf margins usually caused by unfavorable environmental conditions.

Meaning: From the Greek for garlic
Latin Pronunciation: sko-roh-DON-ee-uh

Meaning: From the Greek skorodon (garlic) and prason (leek)
Latin Pronunciation: skor-oh-doh-PRAY-zum


scorpioid

Describes an inflorescence that is circinately coiled while in bud.

Meaning: Scorpion, referring to coiled shape; sometimes spelled scorpoides
Latin Pronunciation: skor-pee-OY-dees

Meaning: From the Greek skorpios (scorpion) and oura (tail), referring to the shape of the pods
Latin Pronunciation: skor-pee-YUR-us

Meaning: Variant spelling of scorpioides, meaning scorpion which refers to coiled shape
Latin Pronunciation: skor-POY-dees


Latin Pronunciation: Skor-zoh-neer-uh
Common Name: Black SalsifyMeaning: (S. hispanica).

Meaning: Having leaves like Scorzonera (genus name meaning black root or viper root, as it was thought to cure snakebites)
Latin Pronunciation: skor-zon-er-ih-FOH-lee-uh

Meaning: Having leaves like Scorzonera (genus name meaning black root or viper root, as it was thought to cure snakebites)
Latin Pronunciation: skor-zon-er-ih-FOH-lee-um

Meaning: Having leaves like Scorzonera (genus name meaning black root or viper root, as it was thought to cure snakebites)
Latin Pronunciation: skor-zon-er-ih-FOH-lee-us

Meaning: Of or from Scotia (Scotland)
Latin Pronunciation: SKOT-eh-kuh

Meaning: Alternate spelling of scoticum, meaning of or from Scotia (Scotland)
Latin Pronunciation: SKA-theh-kum

Meaning: Of or from Scotia (Scotland)
Latin Pronunciation: SKOT-eh-kum

Latin Pronunciation: skot-ik-us
Meaning: of Scotland.

Meaning: Named for Dr. John Scouler, 19th century Scottish botanist who collected in the Pacific Northwest region of the U.S.
Latin Pronunciation: SKOOL-er-ee

Meaning: Named for Dr. John Scouler, 19th century Scottish botanist who collected in the Pacific Northwest region of the U.S.
Latin Pronunciation: skool-ER-ee-a

Meaning: Named for Dr. John Scouler, 19th century Scottish botanist who collected in the Pacific Northwest region of the U.S.
Latin Pronunciation: skool-er-ee-AY-na


scrambler

A plant with long stems, often with thorns to help it support itself as it climbs through shrubs.


scree

Fragmented rocks usually found at the base of a cliff or boulder where the action of wind and water has broken the particles loose. Scree may be used in gardens as a mulch.


screen

A single plant or grouping of plants used to bar certain parts of the landscape from view.

Meaning: (perhaps supposed in some form to have been a scrofula remedy)
Latin Pronunciation: Skroff-yew-lay-ree-uh
Common Name: Fig-wort.

Meaning: The Scrophularia family (genus name comes from the idea that it cured Scrofula)
Latin Pronunciation: skrof-yoo-larr-ee-AY-see

Meaning: Variant spelling of scrophulariifolia; having leaves like Scrophularia (genus whose name comes from the idea that it cured Scrofula due to the similarity of the roots to the disease)
Latin Pronunciation: skrof-yoo-lar-ee-ay-FOH-lee-uh

Meaning: Having leaves like Scrophularia (genus whose name comes from the idea that it cured Scrofula due to the similarity of the roots to the disease); also spelled scrophulariaefolia
Latin Pronunciation: skrof-yoo-lar-ee-eye-FOH-lee-uh

Meaning: growing on broken rock
Latin Pronunciation: skru-pyu-LEH-coh-luh


scuffle hoe

A medium-weight hoe with the blade fastened to the handle in the middle of the horizontal blade, allowing it to be pushed and pulled, cutting weeds on each direction.

Latin Pronunciation: skulp-tus
Meaning: cut, carved.


scurfy

Covered with tiny, broad scales.

Meaning: With a shield
Latin Pronunciation: skut-AY-tuh


scutate (alt. scutellate)

Platter-shaped, with a flat center and raised margins, as a water lily leaf,Nymphaea lotus.

Meaning: With a shield
Latin Pronunciation: skut-AY-tum

Meaning: (tray or dish, as to calyx formation)
Latin Pronunciation: Skew-tel-lay-ree-uh
Common Name: Skullcap.

Meaning: Like the genus Scutellaria
Latin Pronunciation: skew-tell-ar-ee-OY-deez

Meaning: With a shield
Latin Pronunciation: skut-AY-tus

Latin Pronunciation: skew - tel - lay - riss
Meaning: dish-shaped.

Meaning: Covered with little shields or plates
Latin Pronunciation: skew-tel-LAY-tuh


scutelliform

Shaped like a small shield.

Meaning: (whip, as to its long whip-like, channeled leaves)
Latin Pronunciation: Skew-tik-kay-ree-uh.

Latin Pronunciation: skew-turn
Meaning: (like a) shield.

Meaning: From the Greek skyphos (cup or beaker) and anthos (flower)
Latin Pronunciation: sky-FAN-thus

Meaning: From the Greek skyphos (an ancient two-handled cup or beaker) and fera (bearing, bringing)
Latin Pronunciation: sky-fih-FER-uh


scythe

A long-handled blade for making grass into hay; the term is sometimes used for the blade without the handle. See also: snath.

Meaning: Named for Francis Mackenzie, Lord Seaforth, 19th century Governor of Barbados and botanist
Latin Pronunciation: see-FORTH-ee-a

Meaning: Named for Francis Mackenzie, Lord Seaforth, 19th century Governor of Barbados and botanist
Latin Pronunciation: see-forth-ee-AH-num

Meaning: Named for Francis Mackenzie, Lord Seaforth, 19th century Governor of Barbados and botanist
Latin Pronunciation: see-FORTH-ee-eye


seawater

Ocean water with a high salt content.

Meaning: From Sebesten, a name given to a related tree with similar drupes (fruit)
Latin Pronunciation: seb-es-TAY-nuh

Meaning: Bearing wax
Latin Pronunciation: seb-EE-fer-uh

Meaning: Bearing wax
Latin Pronunciation: seb-EE-fer-um

Latin Pronunciation: seb-bif-er-us
Meaning: tallow-bearing.

Meaning: Classical Latin name for rye
Latin Pronunciation: se-KAY-lee

Latin Pronunciation: seb-boh-sus
Meaning: full of tallow or grease.

Meaning: Resembling Secale (genus name for rye)
Latin Pronunciation: se-KAY-lin-uh

Meaning: Resembling Secale (genus name for rye)
Latin Pronunciation: se-KAY-lin-um

Meaning: Resembling Secale (genus name for rye)
Latin Pronunciation: se-KAY-lin-us


secateur

Hand-held pruning shears.


sectio (alt. section)

The category of supplemental taxa at a rank between subgenus and series.

Meaning: (pen, perhaps for the fact that it was fed to hogs)
Latin Pronunciation: Seek-ee-urn
Common Name: Chayote, Christophine.

secondary species

The species subordinate to the dominant species, like dogwood,Cornus, in an oak,Quercus, forest.


sectio (alt. section)

The category of supplemental taxa at a rank between subgenus and series.


secund

Twisted or turned to one side.

Meaning: Having leaves in a row, on one side (secund)
Latin Pronunciation: se-KUN-duh

Meaning: One-sided; secund
Latin Pronunciation: see-kun-DAY-tuh

Meaning: One-sided; secund
Latin Pronunciation: see-kun-DAY-tum

Meaning: Flowers on one side
Latin Pronunciation: sek-und-ee-FLOR-uh

Meaning: Flowers on one side
Latin Pronunciation: sek-und-ee-FLOR-um

Latin Pronunciation: sek-kun-dif-ftoh-rus
Meaning: with one-sided flower cluster.

Meaning: Having leaves in a row, on one side (secund)
Latin Pronunciation: se-KUN-dum

Meaning: Axe-bearing
Latin Pronunciation: sek-YEW-rij-er

Meaning: (hatchet-bearing, as to pod shape)
Latin Pronunciation: Sek-yew-rij-er-uh.

Meaning: Axe-bearing
Latin Pronunciation: sek-yew-RIJ-er-um

Latin Pronunciation: sek-kund-us
Meaning: side-flowering (secund).

Latin Pronunciation: sek-yew-rij-er-us
Meaning: with axe-like parts.


sedatives

Medicines which can slow certain bodily functions and promote sleep.


sedge

Any of the grass-like, monocotyledonous plants of the family Cyperaceae, having achenes and solid stems wich are triangular in cross- section.

Meaning: With fleshy foliage
Latin Pronunciation: sed-ih-FOH-lee-uh

Meaning: With fleshy foliage
Latin Pronunciation: sed-ih-FOH-lee-um

Meaning: With fleshy foliage
Latin Pronunciation: sed-ih-FOH-lee-us

Meaning: Variant spelling of sedoides, resembling Sedum
Latin Pronunciation: see-dee-OY-deez

Meaning: Resembling sedum; also spelled sedioides
Latin Pronunciation: see-DOY-deez

Meaning: (classical name for Houseleek)
Latin Pronunciation: Seed-um
Common Name: Stonecrop, Live-forever.Meaning: (Compare Sempervivum.)

seed

The ripened ovule, consisting of the embryo and its proper coats.


seedbank

A facility designed for the ex situ conservation of individual species and varieties through controlled seed storage.


seedbed

An area cultivated for planting seeds.


seedhead

The dry fruit containing rip seeds.


seedling

A young plant grown from a seed.


seed coat

The outer protective covering of a seed.


seed drill

1. A shallow trench in which to sow seeds. 2. An implement for planting seeds.


seed leaf

A cotyledon.


seed fern

Extinct fern-like plants that bore seeds on the frond.


seed lot

Seeds of a particular crop gathered at one time and likely to have similar germination rates and other characteristics.


spermatophyte (syn. seed plant)

Any plant of the division Spermatophyta, the higher plants that produce seeds, including the gymnosperms and angiosperms.

Meaning: Named for Berthold Carl Seemann, 19th century German collector for the Royal Botanic Gardens at Kew, explorer on the Fiji Islands; also spelled seemanii
Latin Pronunciation: see-MAN-ee-eye
Alternative Self-Pronouncing:see-MAHN-ee-eye

Latin Pronunciation: sej-eet-us
Meaning: of cornfields.

Meaning: Of corn fields
Latin Pronunciation: seg-EE-tum


segment

1. One of the parts of a leaf or other like organ that is cleft or divided.


segregate

1. A new genus culled from an established one for taxonomic reasons. 2. A hybrid which exhibits the genetics of one of the parents more clearly than those of the other parent.

Meaning: Derivation obscure; perhaps an altered spelling of Seguin
Latin Pronunciation: suh-GEEN


seiche

A rapid and sometimes violent fluctuation in water level within a landlocked body of water, usually due to sudden changes in barometric pressure, the ripples lasting from minutes to several hours. See also: tsunami.

Meaning: Named in honor of Dr. Gunnar Seidenfaden, a late 21st century authority on orchids from Denmark.
Latin Pronunciation: sey-den-fad-DEN-ee-uh

Meaning: Named for William Siefriz, 20th century American botanist and author
Latin Pronunciation: see-FRIDZ-ee-eye


selection

A distinct form of a plant, sexual or asexual in origin, selected and propagated for monetary reasons or beauty, and named as a cultivar.

Meaning: (diminutive of irrelevant genus Selago)
Latin Pronunciation: Sel-uh-jin-nell-uh.

selective felling (syn. selective cutting)

When only choice trees are cut in a forest.

Meaning: (Selene's Cactus
Common Name: she was the mythical moon goddess)
Latin Pronunciation: Sel-en-iss-seer-ee-us.
Meaning: (Selene's Orchid
Common Name: see Selenicereus)
Latin Pronunciation: Sel-en-ip-peed-ee-um.

self-clinging

Refers to plants which climb rocks or structures without the support of other plants, perhaps by suckers or tendrils.


self-fertile

Able to be pollinated by its own flowers.


self-pollination

The transfer of pollen from the anther of a flower to the stigma of the same flower, or to different flowers on the same plant.


self-seeding

Produces offspring from seed without intervention.


self-sowing

Produces offspring from seed without intervention.


self

Having a single pure color with no markings.

Meaning: An old name genus for the carrot family
Latin Pronunciation: SEL-in-um

Meaning: Named for Francois Noel Sellier, 18th century French engraver who prepared botanical illustrations
Latin Pronunciation: sel-lee-er-uh

Meaning: Named for Friedrich Sello (changed to Sellow in later years), early 19th century German explorer who collected specimens in South America
Latin Pronunciation: sel-lo-AH-nus

Meaning: Named for Friedrich Sello (changed to Sellow in later years), early 19th century German explorer who collected specimens in South America
Latin Pronunciation: sel-lo-AH-nuh

Meaning: Named for Friedrich Sello (changed to Sellow in later years), early 19th century German explorer who collected specimens in South America
Latin Pronunciation: sel-loh-vee-AH-nuh
Alternative Self-Pronouncing:sel-loh-wee-AH-nuh

Meaning: Named for Friedrich Sello (changed to Sellow in later years), early 19th century German explorer who collected specimens in South America
Latin Pronunciation: SEL-lo-ee

Meaning: Named for Friedrich Sello (changed to Sellow in later years), early 19th century German explorer who collected specimens in South America
Latin Pronunciation: sel-loh-vee-AH-num
Alternative Self-Pronouncing:sel-loh-wee-AH-num

Meaning: Named for Friedrich Sello (changed to Sellow in later years), early 19th century German explorer who collected specimens in South America
Latin Pronunciation: sel-loh-vee-AH-nus
Alternative Self-Pronouncing:sel-loh-wee-AH-nus

Meaning: Named for Friedrich Sello (changed to Sellow in later years), early 19th century German explorer who collected specimens in South America
Latin Pronunciation: sel-LOH-vee-eye
Alternative Self-Pronouncing:sel-LOH-wee-eye

Meaning: Named for Friedrich Sello (changed to Sellow in later years), early 19th century German explorer who collected specimens in South America
Latin Pronunciation: sel-lo-wee-AH-nuh
Alternative Self-Pronouncing:sel-lo-vee-AH-nuh

Meaning: Named for Friedrich Sello (changed to Sellow in later years), early 19th century German explorer who collected specimens in South America
Latin Pronunciation: sel-loh-wee-AH-num
Alternative Self-Pronouncing:sel-loh-vee-AH-num

Meaning: Named for Friedrich Sello (changed to Sellow in later years), early 19th century German explorer who collected specimens in South America
Latin Pronunciation: sel-loh-wee-AH-nus
Alternative Self-Pronouncing:sel-loh-vee-AH-nus

Meaning: Named for Friedrich Sello (changed to Sellow in later years), early 19th century German explorer who collected specimens in South America
Latin Pronunciation: sel-LOH-wee-eye
Alternative Self-Pronouncing:sel-LOH-vee-eye

Meaning: (mythical mother of Dionysus)
Latin Pronunciation: Sem - el - ee
Common Name: Climbing Butchers- broom.

semelparity

Refers to an organism that has a single reproductive season and then dies. See also: iteroparity.

Latin Pronunciation: sem-ee-al-lay-tus
Meaning: semi-or somewhat singed.

Meaning: Prefix meaning half
Latin Pronunciation: sem-ee

Meaning: From the Latin semi (half) and aquilegia (eagle or eagle's claw)
Latin Pronunciation: se-my-a-kwi-LEG-ee-uh
Alternative Self-Pronouncing:se-my-a-kwi-LEE-jee-uh

Meaning: Half-dark; half-mourning (dark clothing historically indicates one in mourning)
Latin Pronunciation: sem-ee-uh-TRAY-tuh
Alternative Self-Pronouncing:sem-ee-ah-TRAT-uh

Meaning: Half-bearded
Latin Pronunciation: sem-ee-bar-BAH-tuh

Meaning: Half-bearded
Latin Pronunciation: sem-ee-bar-BAH-tum

Meaning: Half-bearded
Latin Pronunciation: sem-ee-bar-BAH-tus

Latin Pronunciation: sem-ik-kaw-day-tus
Meaning: partially tailed.

Meaning: Half heart shaped
Latin Pronunciation: sem-ee-kor-DAH-tuh

Latin Pronunciation: sem-iss-sil-/ind-rikus
Meaning: somewhat cylindrical.

Meaning: Half of ten (i.e., five) stamens
Latin Pronunciation: sem-ee-DEK-an-druh
Alternative Self-Pronouncing:sem-my-DEK-an-druh

Meaning: Half of ten (i.e., five) stame
Latin Pronunciation: sem-ee-DEK-an-drum
Alternative Self-Pronouncing:sem-my-DEK-an-drum

Meaning: Half of ten (i.e., five) stamens
Latin Pronunciation: sem-ee-DEK-an-drus
Alternative Self-Pronouncing:sem-my-DEK-an-drus

Meaning: From the Latin semi (half) and decidua (de, down; and cadere, to fall)
Latin Pronunciation: sem-ee-dee-SID-yoo-uh


semidouble (alt. semi-double)

Having more than the usual number of petals but with at least some pollen-producing stamens.


semievergreen (alt. semievergreen)

Retaining at least some green foliage well into winter, or shedding leaves only in cold climates.


semihardwood cutting

A cutting taken from a stem that has just begun to develop woody tissue, for the purpose of propagation.


semihardy

Questionably hardy in a given temperature zone; susceptible to damage by extreme cold or heat.

Meaning: Half-lobed, referring to shapes like the ear lobe
Latin Pronunciation: sem-ee-loh-BAY-tuh
Alternative Self-Pronouncing:sem-my-loh-BAH-tuh

Meaning: Half-lobed, referring to shapes like the ear lobe
Latin Pronunciation: sem-ee-loh-BAY-tus
Alternative Self-Pronouncing:sem-ee-loh-BAY-tus

Meaning: From the Latin semi (half) and pappos (down or fluff)
Latin Pronunciation: sem-ee-pa-POH-sa

Meaning: From the Latin semi (half) and pappos (down or fluff)
Latin Pronunciation: sem-ee-pa-POH-sum

Latin Pronunciation: sem-ip-pin-nay-tus
Meaning:


semiripe cuttings

Cuttings taken in mid-summer to autumn to propagate woody plants.

Meaning: Semi-doubled flowers
Latin Pronunciation: sem-ee-PLEE-nuh


semirotate

Saucer-shaped, almost flat.

Meaning: Half-serrated (toothed like a saw)
Latin Pronunciation: sem-ee-ser-RAY-tuh
Alternative Self-Pronouncing:sem-my-sair-RAY-tuh

Meaning: Half-serrated (toothed like a saw)
Latin Pronunciation: sem-ee-ser-RAY-tum
Alternative Self-Pronouncing:sem-my-sair-RAY-tum

Meaning: Half-serrated (toothed like a saw)
Latin Pronunciation: sem-ee-ser-RAY-tus
Alternative Self-Pronouncing:sem-my-sair-RAY-tus


semiterete

Refers to a cylinder which is rounded on one side, but flat on the other, as some leaf petioles.


Latin Pronunciation: Sem-manth-ee. SempervivumMeaning: (live- forever)
Latin Pronunciation: Sem-per-vye-vum
Common Name: Houseleek.Meaning: (A vagary of plant nomenclature will be illustrated by comparing with the genus Sedum, above.)

Meaning: From the Latin word for remote or distant
Latin Pronunciation: sem-OH-tuh

Meaning: From the Latin word for remote or distant
Latin Pronunciation: sem-OH-tum

Meaning: From the Latin word for remote or distant
Latin Pronunciation: sem-OH-tus

Meaning: Always golden
Latin Pronunciation: sem-per-AWR-ee-uh

Latin Pronunciation: sem - per- aw- ress - senz
Meaning: ever-golden.

Latin Pronunciation: sem-per-floh-renz
Meaning: ever- blooming.

Latin Pronunciation: sem-per-vye-rens
Meaning: evergreen.

Meaning: Always living, living forever
Latin Pronunciation: sem-per-VEE-vuh

Meaning: Resembling plants in the genus Sempervivum (House Leek)
Latin Pronunciation: sem-per-vi-voy-dees

Meaning: Always living, living forever
Latin Pronunciation: sem-per-VEE-vum

Meaning: (the classical name)
Latin Pronunciation: Sen-nee-see-oh
Common Name: Groundsel.

Meaning: Always living, living forever
Latin Pronunciation: sem-per-VEE-vus

Meaning: Of or from Senegal, Africa
Latin Pronunciation: sen-eh-gal-EN-sis


senescence

The process of aging in a plant or plant part (as a leaf) from full maturity to death.

Meaning: Becoming grey
Latin Pronunciation: sen-ESS-kens
Alternative Self-Pronouncing:sen-ESS-ens


senescent

Dying of tissues following maturity.

Meaning: Of an old man
Latin Pronunciation: SEE-nil-ee

Latin Pronunciation: sen-il-iss
Meaning: old, hoary.

Meaning: Latin form of Arabic word for a thorny bush
Latin Pronunciation: SEN-nuh

Latin Pronunciation: sen-sib-il-iss
Meaning: sensitive.

Latin Pronunciation: sen-sit-tye-vus
Meaning: sensitive.


sensu

Meaning "in the sense of" in taxonomy.

Meaning: Full of thorns; thorny
Latin Pronunciation: sen-tih-KOH-suh

Meaning: Full of thorns; thorny
Latin Pronunciation: sen-tih-KOH-sus

Meaning: Full of thorns; thorny
Latin Pronunciation: sen-tih-KOH-sum

Meaning: Named for Lpez Seoane, 19th century Spanish botanist
Latin Pronunciation: say-OH-nee-eye


sepaloid

Like a sepal.

Meaning: From the Latin sepes (sepis), meaning hedge
Latin Pronunciation: sep-ee-AIR-ee-uh


sepal

A division of a calyx; one of the outermost circles of modified leaves surrounding the reproductive organs.


sepaline

Refers to sepals.

Latin Pronunciation: seep-ee-um
Meaning: of hedges.


septate

Divided by partitions.


sept

A small dent or cavity.

Latin Pronunciation: sep-tan-gew-lay-riss
Meaning: seven-angled.


septate

Divided by partitions.

Meaning: Prefix meaning seven
Latin Pronunciation: septem

Meaning: With seven cuts
Latin Pronunciation: sep-TEM-fee-duh

Latin Pronunciation: sep-tem-fye-dus
Meaning: seven- parted.

Latin Pronunciation: sep-tem-loh-bus
Meaning: seven- lobed.

Meaning: With seven cuts
Latin Pronunciation: sep-tem-punk-TAH-tuh

Latin Pronunciation: sop-tem-punk-taytus
Meaning: seven-spotted.

Meaning: Northern
Latin Pronunciation: sep-ten-tree-oh-NAH-lee
Alternative Self-Pronouncing:sep-ten-tree-oh-NAH-lay

Latin Pronunciation: sep-tent-ree-on-nayliss
Meaning: of the north.

Latin Pronunciation: sep-tiss-seps
Meaning: seven-headed.


septicidal

Describes a capsule that is dehiscing through the partitions and between the cells.


septifragal

Describes the dehiscence of a fruit where the valves or backs of the carpels break away leaving the septa intact.


septum (pl. septa)

Any kind of partition.

Latin Pronunciation: sep-pull-tus
Meaning: buried.

Meaning: (for Sequoya, actually George Guess, a Cherokee half-breed and originator of the Cherokee syllabary)
Latin Pronunciation: See-kwoy-uh
Common Name: RedwoodMeaning: (S. sempervirens).
Meaning: (Sequoia-tree)
Latin Pronunciation: See kwoy-ad-den-dron
Common Name: Giant Sequoia.

Meaning: Named for the Egyptian god Serapis
Latin Pronunciation: ser-uh-PEE-ass


sere

The complete cycle of changes from the original state to the climax condition, e.g., oak-maple forest, forest destroyed by fire, meadow, brushland, young mixed conifer- deciduous forest, oak-maple forest.


seriate

In a whorl or row, generally preceded by a number or numerical prefix, as triseriate meaning in three rows.

Meaning: From the Greek seri (silk) and anthos (flower)
Latin Pronunciation: ser-ee-AN-theez

Meaning: Silky
Latin Pronunciation: ser-IK-ee-uh


sericeous

Bearing fine, usually straight, appressed, hairs.

Meaning: (for American botanist Sereno Watson)
Latin Pronunciation: Sehr - en - noh- uh
Common Name: Saw- palmetto, Scrub-palmetto.

Meaning: Silky
Latin Pronunciation: ser-IK-ee-um

Latin Pronunciation: ser-riss-ee-us
Meaning: silky.

Meaning: From sericus (silky) and kephale (head or top), referring to the downy hairs on the twigs and petioles
Latin Pronunciation: ser-ik-oh-SEF-uh-luh
Alternative Self-Pronouncing:ser-ik-oh-KEF-uh-luh

Meaning: From the Latin, meaning silk-bearing
Latin Pronunciation: ser-ik-IF-er-uh

Meaning: From sericus (silky) and kephale (head or top), referring to the downy hairs on the twigs and petioles
Latin Pronunciation: ser-ik-oh-SEF-uh-lum
Alternative Self-Pronouncing:ser-ik-oh-KEF-uh-lum

Meaning: From sericus (silky) and kephale (head or top), referring to the downy hairs on the twigs and petioles
Latin Pronunciation: ser-ik-oh-SEF-uh-lus
Alternative Self-Pronouncing:ser-ik-oh-KEF-uh-lus

Latin Pronunciation: ser-ik-koh-fer-us
Meaning: having silk, silky.

Meaning: Silky white
Latin Pronunciation: ser-ik-oh-LEW-kuh

Meaning: Silky white
Latin Pronunciation: ser-ik-oh-LEW-kum

Meaning: Silky white
Latin Pronunciation: ser-ik-oh-LEW-kus

Meaning: Silky leaves
Latin Pronunciation: ser-ik-oh-FIL-um

Meaning: Silky leaves
Latin Pronunciation: ser-ik-oh-FIL-uh

Meaning: Silky leaves
Latin Pronunciation: ser-ik-oh-FIL-us


series

A group of similar, but not identical, plants.


Latin Pronunciation: Ser-riss-uh.

Meaning: very late
Latin Pronunciation: seh-RIS-see-muh

Meaning: Named for Rev. Father Philippe Sergeant, 18th century French monk skilled in botany
Latin Pronunciation: ser-YA-nee-uh

Meaning: Flowers late
Latin Pronunciation: se-roh-TEE-nuh


serotinal

Appearing in the autumn or late summer.

Meaning: Flowers late
Latin Pronunciation: se-roh-TEE-num

Latin Pronunciation: ser-rot-in-us
Meaning: late-flowering or -fruiting.

Latin Pronunciation: ser-penz
Meaning: creeping.

Meaning: Referring to a snake
Latin Pronunciation: ser-pen-TEE-nuh

Meaning: Referring to serpents; some sources state it has the ability to heal snakebites
Alternative Meaning:In Greek mythology, Asklepios was changed into a constellation and became this plant;
Latin Pronunciation: ser-pen-TAIR-ee-uh

Meaning: Referring to a snake
Latin Pronunciation: ser-pen-TEE-num

Latin Pronunciation: ser-pen-tye-nus
Meaning: looping,waving; snake-like.

Meaning: Having leaves like Thymus serpyllum
Latin Pronunciation: ser-pil-ly-FOH-lee-uh

Meaning: Another name for Thyme; Thymus serpyllum means Thyme thyme
Latin Pronunciation: ser-PIE-lum

Meaning: Toothed like a saw
Latin Pronunciation: sair-AY-tuh
Alternative Self-Pronouncing:ser-RAT-uh


serrate

Having sharp teeth pointing forward.

Meaning: Margins of foliage are toothed like a saw
Latin Pronunciation: sair-rat-ih-FOH-lee-uh
Alternative Self-Pronouncing:ser-at-ih-FOH-lee-uh

Latin Pronunciation: ser-at-if-foh-lee-us
Meaning: tooth-leaved.

Meaning: Margins of foliage are toothed like a saw
Latin Pronunciation: sair-rat-ih-FOH-lee-um
Alternative Self-Pronouncing:ser-rat-ih-FOH-lee-um

Meaning: Serrated fingers
Latin Pronunciation: ser-RAH-toh dig-ee-TAH-tuh
Alternative Self-Pronouncing:ser-RAT-oh dij-ee-TAH-tuh

Meaning: (for serrate or roughish leaf margins)
Latin Pronunciation: Sehr-rat-yew-luh.

Meaning: With serrated (toothed) petals
Latin Pronunciation: ser-rat-ih-PET-uh-luh

Meaning: Toothed like a saw
Latin Pronunciation: sair-AY-tum
Alternative Self-Pronouncing:ser-RAT-um

Latin Pronunciation: se r - ray - tus
Meaning: saw-toothed (serrate).

Meaning: Serrated (toothed) margins
Latin Pronunciation: ser-ee-OH-luh

Meaning: Small-toothed, referring to leaf margins
Latin Pronunciation: ser-yoo-LAY-tuh
Alternative Self-Pronouncing:ser-roo-LAH-tuh


serrulate

Finely serrate.

Meaning: Small-toothed, referring to leaf margins
Latin Pronunciation: ser-yoo-LAY-tum
Alternative Self-Pronouncing:ser-roo-LAH-tum

Latin Pronunciation: ser-rew-lay-tus
Meaning: somewhat toothed.

Meaning: Named for Prof. James Serrurier, 18th century botanist
Latin Pronunciation: ser-ROO-ree-uh


Latin Pronunciation: Ses-bay-nee-uh.

Latin Pronunciation: Sess-uh-mum
Common Name: SesameMeaning: (S.orientale).

Meaning: Ancient name for an umbelliferous plant
Latin Pronunciation: SE-sel-ee

Meaning: Named for Leonardo Sesler, 18th-century physician and botanist
Latin Pronunciation: ses-LER-ee-ah

Meaning: One and a half feet long
Latin Pronunciation: ses-kwee-ped-AY-lee

Latin Pronunciation: ses-kwip-ed-day-liss
Meaning: one and a half foot lengths (roughly 18 inches).

Latin Pronunciation: sess-if-floh-rus
Meaning: stalkless- flowered.

Meaning: From the Latin sessilis, meaning low, sitting; fixed, attached
Latin Pronunciation: SES-sile
Alternative Self-Pronouncing:SES-sil-lee

Meaning: With stalkless flowers
Latin Pronunciation: sess-il-ee-FLOR-us

Latin Pronunciation: sess-if-foh-lee-us
Meaning: stalk less-leaved.

Meaning: With stalkless flowers
Latin Pronunciation: sess-il-ee-FLOR-uh

Meaning: With stalkless flowers
Latin Pronunciation: sess-il-ee-FLOR-um

Meaning: Unstalked, petioled leaves
Latin Pronunciation: ses-ee-lee-FOH-lee-um

Meaning: Unstalked, petioled leaves
Latin Pronunciation: ses-ee-lee-FOH-lee-uh

Latin Pronunciation: sess-it-if-foh-lee-us
Meaning: stalk less-leaved.

Latin Pronunciation: sess-il-iss
Meaning: stalkless (sessile).

Meaning: From the area inhabited by the Sesuvii, a Gallic tribe mentioned by Caesar; the application to this plant is obscure)
Latin Pronunciation: ses-OO-vee-um


seta

1. A bristle. 2. In mosses, the stalk holding the spore capsule.


set

1. The development of fruit, and or seed, following pollination; to set seed. 2. To transplant as seedlings. 3. To apply as a graft. 4. A young bulb, tuber, or other type of vegetative propagule ready for planting. 5. Transformation of cement paste or concrete from a fluid-like consistency to a stiff mass.

Meaning: Bristly
Latin Pronunciation: se-TAY-see-uh


setaceous

Bristle-like.

Meaning: Bristly
Latin Pronunciation: se-TAY-see-um

Latin Pronunciation: set-tay-see-us
Meaning: bristle-like (setaceous).

Meaning: From the Latin seta (bristle), referring to the bristles on the spikelet
Latin Pronunciation: set-TARE-ee-uh

Meaning: Bristle-like
Latin Pronunciation: set-AY-spin-uh

Meaning: Of or from Sichuan (Szechwan) province, China
Latin Pronunciation: sech-yoo-en-EN-sis

Meaning: Bristle
Latin Pronunciation: SET-kree-zee-uh

Meaning: The name given to this genus in the mid-20th century.
Latin Pronunciation: set-kree-AYE-see-uh

Meaning: Bearing bristles
Latin Pronunciation: set-EE-fer-uh

Meaning: Bearing bristles
Latin Pronunciation: set-EE-fer-um

Meaning: With bristly leaves
Latin Pronunciation: set-ee-FOH-lee-uh

Meaning: With bristly leaves
Latin Pronunciation: set-ee-FOH-lee-um

Meaning: With bristly leaves
Latin Pronunciation: set-ee-FOH-lee-us


setiform

Bristle-shaped.

Meaning: Bearing bristles
Latin Pronunciation: set-EE-ger-uh

Meaning: Bearing bristles
Latin Pronunciation: set-EE-ger-um

Latin Pronunciation: set-tij-er-us
Meaning: bristly.

Latin Pronunciation: set-iss-spye-nus
Meaning: bristly spined.


setose

Beset with bristles.

Meaning: Bristly
Latin Pronunciation: set-OH-suh

Meaning: Hairiest
Latin Pronunciation: set-oh-SIS-ee-mum

Meaning: Hairiest
Latin Pronunciation: set-oh-SIS-ee-muh

Meaning: Hairiest
Latin Pronunciation: set-oh-SIS-ee-mus

Meaning: Bristly
Latin Pronunciation: set-OH-sum

Latin Pronunciation: set-toh-sus
Meaning: bristly.


setulose

Having minute bristles.

Latin Pronunciation: set-tew-loh-sus
Meaning: with many small bristles (setose).


set seed (alt. go to seed)

To produce seeds after flowering. In some cases a gardener wishes to prevent this in an effort to prolong flowering, or continue harvesting the foliage of an herb.

Meaning: Prefix meaning six
Latin Pronunciation: seks

Latin Pronunciation: sex-an-gew-/ay-riss
Meaning: six- angled.

Meaning: Six-angled
Latin Pronunciation: seks-an-gew-LAIR-ee

Meaning: From the latin sex (six) and seminifera (bearing seed)
Latin Pronunciation: seks-sem-in-IF-er-a

Meaning: With six styles
Latin Pronunciation: seks-sty-LOH-suh

Meaning: With six styles
Latin Pronunciation: seks-sty-LOH-sum

Meaning: With six styles
Latin Pronunciation: seks-sty-LOH-sus


sextant

An instrument used mostly at sea, where there are no bench marks, to determine location by latitude and longitude.

Meaning: Named for Henry Seymer, 19th century amateur botanist and collector of many exotic plants
Latin Pronunciation: sey-MER-ee-uh


shade tree

A larger tree planted in a location where the canopy provides shade at ground level.


shade (adj. shady)

Light diminished by some blocking feature. See also: light shade.


shade (adj. shady)

Light diminished by some blocking feature. See also: light shade.


sharp-pointed

Acute, mucronate, pungent.

Meaning: From the Chinook (American Indian) vernacular name Kikwu-salu for this plant
Latin Pronunciation: SHAL-lon


sharp sand

Coarse sand used to loosen heavy soil and in construction, as opposed to the more finer grained play sand.


sheath

A tubular envelope, as the lower part of the leaf in grasses.

Meaning: (for English botanist John Shepherd)
Latin Pronunciation: Shep-herd-ee-uh
Common Name: Buf-falo-berryMeaning: (S. argentea).

Meaning: Named for Dr. William Sherard 18th century Brittish patron of botany
Latin Pronunciation: sher-RAR-dee-uh

Meaning: Named after a Sheldon, but not sure which one
Latin Pronunciation: shel-DON-ee-eye


sheathing

Enclosing as by a sheath.

Meaning: Named for Major George Sherriff, 20th century explorer of southeastern Tibet with Frank Ludlow
Latin Pronunciation: sher-RIF-ee-eye

Meaning: Of or from Shihmen, a small town in the Taiwan province of China
Latin Pronunciation: shy-mee-EN-see

Meaning: Of or from Shihmen, a small town in the Taiwan province of China
Latin Pronunciation: shy-mee-EN-sis

Meaning: Of or from the Shinano River area, the longest river in Japan, running through central Honshu
Latin Pronunciation: shin-an-EN-see

Meaning: Of or from the Shinano River area, the longest river in Japan, running through central Honshu
Latin Pronunciation: shin-an-EN-sis

Meaning: Named for Lloyd Herbert Shinners, 20th century Canadian-born botanist at Southern Methodist University in Texas, and specalist in Texas flora
Latin Pronunciation: shin-NERS-ee-a

Meaning: Named for Lloyd Herbert Shinners, 20th century Canadian-born botanist at Southern Methodist University in Texas, and specalist in Texas flora
Latin Pronunciation: shin-NERS-ee-eye

Meaning: Named for Homi (or Miho) Shirasawa, 20th century Japanese dendrologist
Latin Pronunciation: shir-ah-sa-WAN-um

Meaning: Named for Homi (or Miho) Shirasawa, 20th century Japanese dendrologist
Latin Pronunciation: shir-ah-sa-WAN-uh


short-lived

Describes a plant, usually perennial, where the individuals live for only a few seasons.


shoot

A young, actively growing twig or stem.

Meaning: (for American botanist Charles W. Short)
Latin Pronunciation: Short-ee-uh.

short-day

Of, relating to, or being a plant which flowers only after being exposed to daylight for periods shorter than a particular length, usually in the fall or spring.


shovel

1. A long-handled scoop-like implement used for digging, lifting, and throwing, etc. 2. The quantity contained in one scoop.


shreddy

Dividing into fragile, thin, narrow sheets.


shrub

A woody perennial, smaller than a tree, usually with several stems.


shrublet

A dwarf woody plant.

Meaning: Named for Benjamin Franklin Shumard, 19th century Texas state geologist
Latin Pronunciation: shoo-mard-ee-AH-na

Meaning: Named for Benjamin Franklin Shumard, 19th century Texas state geologist
Latin Pronunciation: shoo-MARD-ee-eye

Meaning: Of or from the Shweli River (Longchuan Jiang), in western China
Latin Pronunciation: shwel-ee-EN-see

Meaning: Of or from the Shweli River (Longchuan Jiang), in western China
Latin Pronunciation: shwel-ee-EN-sis


sialagogues

Herbal medicines that can increase the flow of saliva.

Meaning: Of or from Siam, Thailand
Latin Pronunciation: sy-am-EN-see

Meaning: Of or from Siam (Thailand)
Latin Pronunciation: sy-am-EN-sis

Meaning: Named for Sir robert Sibbald, 18th century professor of medicine at the University of Edinburgh
Latin Pronunciation: sy-BAL-dee-uh

Meaning: Of or from Siberia; also spelled sibirica
Latin Pronunciation: sy-BEER-ah-kuh

Meaning: Of or from Siberia; also spelled sibiricum
Latin Pronunciation: sy-BEER-ah-kum

Meaning: Of or from Siberia; also spelled sibiricus
Latin Pronunciation: sy-BEER-ah-kus

Meaning: (for Siberia, its habitat)
Latin Pronunciation: Sye-bir-ree-uh.

Meaning: Variant of siberica, meaning of or from Siberia
Latin Pronunciation: sy-BEER-ah-kuh

Meaning: Variant of sibericum, meaning of or from Siberia
Latin Pronunciation: sy-BEER-ah-kum

Latin Pronunciation: sye-bihr-ik-us
Meaning: of Siberia.

Meaning: (for one John Sibthorp)
Latin Pronunciation: Sib-thorp-ee-uh.

Meaning: Named for John Sibthorp, 18th century English botanist
Latin Pronunciation: sib-THORP-ee-eye

Meaning: Of or from Sibuyan Island, of the Romblon Province in the Philippines
Latin Pronunciation: see-bew-yan-EN-see

Meaning: Of or from Sibuyan Island, of the Romblon Province in the Philippines
Latin Pronunciation: see-bew-yan-EN-sis


Latin Pronunciation: Sik-kay-nuh
Common Name: Curuba, Cassa-banana.

Meaning: Latinized form of shekar, from the Hebrew meaning strong (fermented) drink
Latin Pronunciation: sy-ker-AR-ee-uh
Alternative Self-Pronouncing:sy-ser-AR-ee-uh

Meaning: Of or from Sichuan, China
Latin Pronunciation: sich-WAN-ih-ka

Meaning: Of or from Sichuan, China
Latin Pronunciation: sich-WAN-ih-kum

Meaning: Of or from Sichuan, China
Latin Pronunciation: sich-WAN-ih-kus


sickle

1. A short-handled hand tool similar to a scythe but smaller and curved into a semicircle, used to cut heavier crops like corn, Zea mays.


sickle bar

A mechanical cutting tool that fastens onto a tractor's power source.

Meaning: Of or from Sicily
Latin Pronunciation: SIK-yoo-luh

Meaning: Of or from Sicily
Latin Pronunciation: SIK-yoo-lum

Latin Pronunciation: sik-yew-lus
Meaning: with or like a little dagger.

Meaning: Resembles Sicyos (genus name for the bur cucumber)
Latin Pronunciation: sis-ee-OY-deez

Meaning: Greek name for cucumber, bur cucumber
Latin Pronunciation: SIS-eye-os

Meaning: Greek name for a type of water lily although Sida is now a name for a type of Mallow
Latin Pronunciation: SEE-duh


Latin Pronunciation: Sye-dal-see-uh.

Meaning: Rafinesque authored the name to mean rusty fur (from the Greek sideros - iron; and sisura - goat skin)
Latin Pronunciation: sy-DEE-ra-sis

Meaning: (iron, perhaps as to tonic vir-tues)
Latin Pronunciation: Sid-er-rye-tiss.
Meaning: (iron-wood)
Latin Pronunciation: Sid-er-rox-il-on.

Meaning: Named for Franz Sieber, 19th century Bohemian botanist, traveller and plant collector
Latin Pronunciation: sy-BER-ee

Meaning: Named for Franz Sieber, 19th century Bohemian botanist, traveller and plant collector
Latin Pronunciation: sy-ber-ee-AY-nuh
Alternative Self-Pronouncing:sy-ber-ee-AH-nuh

Meaning: Named for Franz Philipp von Siebold, 19th century German botanical Japan researcher
Latin Pronunciation: see-bold-ee-AH-nuh

Meaning: Named for Franz Philipp von Siebold, 19th century German botanical Japan researcher
Latin Pronunciation: see-bold-ee-AH-num

Meaning: Named for Franz Philipp von Siebold, 19th century German botanical Japan researcher
Latin Pronunciation: see-bold-ee-AH-nus

Meaning: Named for Franz Philipp von Siebold, 19th century German botanical Japan researcher
Latin Pronunciation: see-BOLD-ee-eye

Meaning: A troublesome weed named by Linnaeus for Johann Siegesbeck, one of his critics
Latin Pronunciation: see-guess-BECK-e-ya
Alternative Self-Pronouncing:Sye-gus-BECK-ya

Meaning: Named for Johann Georg Siegesbeck, 18th century bitter rival of Linnaeus (the plant is arguably small-flowered, unpleasant-smelling, weedy, and grows in mud)
Latin Pronunciation: sig-es-BEK-ee-uh


sigmoid

Curved like the letter S.

Meaning: Marked
Latin Pronunciation: sig-NAY-tuh

Meaning: Marked
Latin Pronunciation: sig-NAY-tum

Latin Pronunciation: sig-nay-tus
Meaning: marked, notable.

Meaning: Of or from Sikkim, India
Latin Pronunciation: sik-im-EN-see

Meaning: Of or from Sikkim, India
Latin Pronunciation: sik-im-EN-sis

Meaning: Of or from Shikoku, in southern Japan
Latin Pronunciation: si-ko-kee-AH-na

Meaning: Of or from Shikoku, in southern Japan
Latin Pronunciation: si-ko-kee-AH-num

Meaning: Of or from Shikoku, in southern Japan
Latin Pronunciation: si-ko-kee-AH-nus


Latin Pronunciation: Sye-Teen-ee
Common Name: Catchfly, Cam-pion.

Meaning: Named for A.L. Siler, who discovered the species in the late 19th century in Utah
Latin Pronunciation: SY-ler-ee


siliceous

Containing silica.


silicle (alt. silicula, alt. silicule)

A short silique, no more than twice as long as it is broad.

Latin Pronunciation: sil - liss - ee - us
Meaning: growing in sandy places.

Meaning: From the Latin, meaning pod or husk
Latin Pronunciation: SIL-ly-kwah

Meaning: Has pods
Latin Pronunciation: sil-ee-KWAS-tra

Meaning: Has pods
Latin Pronunciation: sil-ee-KWAS-trum

Meaning: Has pods
Latin Pronunciation: sil-ee-KWAS-trus


silique (syn. siliqua)

A dry, dehiscent, elongated fruit formed from a superior ovary of two carpels, with two parietal placentas and divided into two loculi by a false septum between the placentas, occurring in plants of the family Cruciferae.

Meaning: Has many pods
Latin Pronunciation: sil-ee-KWO-suh

Meaning: Has many pods
Latin Pronunciation: sil-ee-KWO-sum

Meaning: Has many pods
Latin Pronunciation: sil-ee-KWO-sus


silky

Covered with close-pressed soft and straight pubescence.

Meaning: Of or from the Cerro de la Silla (Saddle Mountain), Mexico
Latin Pronunciation: see-yuh-MON-tah-nuh
Alternative Self-Pronouncing:sil-luh-mon-TAY-nuh


Latin Pronunciation: Sill-fee-urn
Common Name: Rosinweed. SilybumMeaning: (classical name for Thistle)
Latin Pronunciation: Sill-ib-um.

silt

Fine- grained sediment usually 1/20 millimeter or less in diameter, finer than sand particles and coarser then those composing clay.


silt load

The particles finer than sand which are carried in a suspended state in moving water. See also: bed load.

Meaning: Named for Count Ernst Emmanuel Silva-Tarouca, 20th century Austrian botanist who created an arboretum near Prague, Czechoslovakia
Latin Pronunciation: SIL-vuh tar-OO-kan-uh

Meaning: Of the woods, forests
Latin Pronunciation: sil-VAT-ee-kuh

Meaning: Of the woods, forests
Latin Pronunciation: sil-VAT-ee-kum

Latin Pronunciation: sil-vat-ik-us
Meaning: of the woods.

Meaning: Named for William Arents Silveus, early 21st century attorney and agrostologist in San Antonio, Texas (U.S.)
Latin Pronunciation: silv-ee-AY-na

Meaning: Named for William Arents Silveus, early 21st century attorney and agrostologist in San Antonio, Texas (U.S.)
Latin Pronunciation: silv-ee-AY-nus

Meaning: Of the woods, forests
Latin Pronunciation: sil-VES-tree

Meaning: Named for Filippo Silvestri, 19th century Italian entomologist and zoologist; also spelled sylvestrii
Latin Pronunciation: sil-VEST-ree-eye

Latin Pronunciation: sil-vest-riss
Meaning: pertaining to woods.


silvicolous

Growing in woodlands.


silviculture

The cultivation and care of forest trees.

Meaning: Ancient Greek name for some edible thistles
Latin Pronunciation: SIGH-lee-bum
Alternative Self-Pronouncing:si-LEE-bum

Meaning: Similar
Latin Pronunciation: SIM-il-ee

Meaning: Similar
Latin Pronunciation: SIM-il-iss

Meaning: Named for Thomas William Simmonds, 18th century English botanist who died while exploring Trinidad
Latin Pronunciation: sim-MONDS-ee-uh


simple

Of one piece; not compound.

Latin Pronunciation: sim-plex
Meaning: unbranched.


simple fruit

A fruit developed from a single ovary.


simple leaf

A leaf with an undivided blade.

Meaning: Unbranched stem
Latin Pronunciation: sim-plik-ee-KAW-lee

Latin Pronunciation: sim-pliss-ik-kaw-liss
Meaning: with unbranched stems.

Meaning: Simple leaves
Latin Pronunciation: sim-plik-ee-FOH-lee-uh

Meaning: Simple leaves
Latin Pronunciation: sim-plik-ee-FOH-lee-um

Latin Pronunciation: sim-pliss-if-foh-lee-us
Meaning: with simple (single, not compound)leaves.

Meaning: Simpler
Latin Pronunciation: sim-PLIK-ee-or

Meaning: Simple (undivided) leaf
Latin Pronunciation: sim-plik-ee-PIN-a

Meaning: Simple (undivided) leaf
Latin Pronunciation: sim-plik-ee-PIN-um

Meaning: Most simple
Latin Pronunciation: sim-plih-KISS-ee-muh

Latin Pronunciation: sim-yew-lanz
Meaning: similar (type).

Meaning: Commemorates various Simpsons, one being James H. Simpson, 19th century explorer with the U.S. Army Corp of Engineers
Latin Pronunciation: simp-SON-ee-eye

Meaning: Resembling, simulates, pretending
Latin Pronunciation: sim-yoo-LAH-tuh

Meaning: Of or from Sinaloa (Mexico)
Latin Pronunciation: see-nah-loh-EN-sis

Meaning: From the ancient Greek word sinapi, used by Theophrastus for Mustard
Latin Pronunciation: sin-NAP-is

Meaning: Of or from the Sinchiang River, in Bangkok
Latin Pronunciation: sin-chee-ang-EN-see

Meaning: Named for Dr. Andrew Sinclair, surgeon on the HMS Sulfur and plant collector
Latin Pronunciation: sin-KLARE-ee-a

Meaning: Named for Dr. Andrew Sinclair, surgeon on the HMS Sulfur and plant collector
Latin Pronunciation: sin-klare-ee-AH-num

Meaning: Named for Dr. Andrew Sinclair, surgeon on the HMS Sulfur and plant collector
Latin Pronunciation: sin-KLARE-ee-eye

Meaning: Of or from China
Latin Pronunciation: sye-NEN-see

Latin Pronunciation: sin-nen-siss
Meaning: of China.

Meaning: Of or from Singapore
Latin Pronunciation: sing-uh-por-EN-see

Meaning: Of or from Singapore
Latin Pronunciation: sing-uh-por-EN-sis


single-worked

Grafted only once so that the grafted plant consists of rootstock and scion.


single

1. A single flower. 2. Describes varieties having only one bloom per stem.


single flower

A plant containing the normal number of petals. Double flowers often have multiples of the normal number: 6 or 9 for three-petal flowers, 8 or 12 for four-petals flowers, etc.

Meaning: Of or from China
Latin Pronunciation: SIN-ee-ka

Meaning: Of or from China
Latin Pronunciation: SIN-eek-um

Latin Pronunciation: sin-ik-us
Meaning: Chinese.

Meaning: (for German gardener Wilhelm Sinning)
Latin Pronunciation: Sin-nin-jee-uh.

Meaning: Compound word - sino refers to China; gracilis (graceful or slender)
Latin Pronunciation: sy-no-GRASS-il-is

Meaning: From the Latin sino- (referring to China) and John George Jack, 20th century Canadian dendrologist and explorer of North America as well as Europe and the Far East
Latin Pronunciation: sy-no-JAK-ee-a

Meaning: (Chinese-moon, for moon- seed)
Latin Pronunciation: Sye-noh-meen-ee-um.

Meaning: In compound words, sino refers to China; syriacus refers to Syria (once considered the native habitat)
Latin Pronunciation: sy-no-SEER-ee-AY-kus

Meaning: With a wavy margined
Latin Pronunciation: sin-yoo-AY-tuh
Alternative Self-Pronouncing:sin-yoo-AH-tuh


sinuate

With the outline of the margin strongly wavy.

Meaning: Wavy-edged leaf
Latin Pronunciation: sin-yoo-at-ih-FOH-lee-uh

Meaning: With a wavy margined
Latin Pronunciation: sin-yoo-AY-tum
Alternative Self-Pronouncing:sin-yoo-AH-tum

Latin Pronunciation: sin-yew-ay-tus
Meaning: wavy-margined (sinuate).

Latin Pronunciation: sin-yew-oh-sus
Meaning: wavy edged (sinuate).


sinuous

Wavy like the path of a snake.


sinus

The cleft or recess between two lobes.

Meaning: Referring to the Iroquois Indian use of the plant for treating syphilis
Latin Pronunciation: sigh-fy-LY-tih-kuh

Meaning: From the Greek siphon (tube) and Osmanthus, referring to the curved corolla
Latin Pronunciation: sy-fon-os-MAN-thus

Meaning: From Sisal, the former chief port of Yucatan)
Latin Pronunciation: sis-al-AY-nuh

Meaning: Ancient Greek name for various plants
Latin Pronunciation: sis-SIM-bree-um

Meaning: (classical name)
Latin Pronunciation: Siss-ir-rink-ee-um
Common Name: Blue-eyed-grass.

Latin Pronunciation: sit - then -siss
Meaning: of Sitka (Alaska).

Meaning: From sion, ancient Greek name applied to a perennial of wet and marshy places in the northern hemisphere
Latin Pronunciation: SEE-um

Meaning: Named for Mary Sizemore, 21st century American plant explorer in Vietnam
Latin Pronunciation: size-MOR-ee-ay


skeletonized

Refers to a leaf which has only ribs and veins left, the soft tissue having been consumed by insects or bacteria.


skeletonizer

Any of various lepidopterous larvae that eat the parenchyma of leaves reducing them to a skeleton of veins.


Latin Pronunciation: Skim-mee-uh.

Meaning: Named for George Ure Skinner, 19th plant collector in Guatemala and Central America
Latin Pronunciation: SKIN-ner-ee
Alternative Self-Pronouncing:SKIN-ner-eye


skylight

The diffuse and reflected light of the sky. See also: direct sunlight.


sludge

Precipitate of solids from water or sewage treatment, which may or may not contain harmful compounds; generally composted for a year or two before applying as organic fertilizer.

Meaning: Named for Dr. John Kunkel Small, 20th century American explorer and botanist
Latin Pronunciation: SMALL-ee-ah-nah


slump test

A test used to determine workability of cement or concrete.

Meaning: Named for Dr. John Kunkel Small, 20th century American explorer and botanist
Latin Pronunciation: SMAL-ee-eye


small fruits

Those species which produce edible fruits, but do not grow on trees, e.g., strawberries and blueberries.

Meaning: (Smilax-like)
Latin Pronunciation: Smye-las-sye-nuh
Common Name: False Solomons-seal.

Meaning: Named for Sir James Edward Smith, 18th century English botanist
Latin Pronunciation: SMITH-ee-eye

Meaning: (Smith's-flower, for botan-ical artist Matilda Smith)
Latin Pronunciation: Smith-ee-anth-uh.
Meaning: (classical name for Bindweed)
Latin Pronunciation: Smye-lax
Common Name: Greenbrier.

smoke jumper

A trained firefighter who is dropped from an airplane in the path of a wildfire to attempt to control the blaze.


smooth

Without roughness or pubescence.

Meaning: Named for Jan Smuts, 20th century South African Prime Minister and botanist
Latin Pronunciation: smuts-ee-AY-nuh

Meaning: From the Greek smyrnion (myrrh); referring to its smell
Latin Pronunciation: SMIR-nee-um

Meaning: Named for Jan Smuts, 20th century South African Prime Minister and botanist
Latin Pronunciation: SMUTS-ee-eye


snow fencing

Wooden or plastic lath joined by wire into long rolls, then erected 100 feet (33 m.) or so on the windward side of a road or barnyard. The lath breaks the velocity of the wind allowing snow particles to drop before reaching the road. It may also be used as a shade cover for plants.


snath

The handle of a scythe.


snag

1. Part of the rootstock left during a graft to hold the scion in place. 2. Removal of the projection when the scion no longer needs it. 3. A rough projection on a woody plant which needs to be removed.


sobole

A shoot, especially from the ground.

Meaning: From the Latin soboles (offshoots); bearing creeping, rooting stems
Latin Pronunciation: soh-boh-LIF-er-a
Alternative Self-Pronouncing:soh-boh-LEE-fer-a


soboliferous

Bearing soboles.

Meaning: From the Latin soboles (offshoots); bearing creeping, rooting stems
Latin Pronunciation: soh-boh-LIF-er-um
Alternative Self-Pronouncing:soh-boh-LEE-fer-um

Meaning: (for Spanish physician-bota-nist Francisco Sobral)
Latin Pronunciation: Sob-ray-lee-uh.

Meaning: From the Latin from Latin sociare (to join, associate
Latin Pronunciation: so-shee-AH-bil-is

Latin Pronunciation: sob-ol-/if-er-us
Meaning: bearing creeping rooting stems or shoots.

Latin Pronunciation: soh-see-ay-liss
Meaning: companion able.

Meaning: In groups
Latin Pronunciation: so-KEE-ah-lee
Alternative Self-Pronouncing:so-SEE-ah-lee


social facilitation

The effect of the closeness of one organism upon the conduct of another one.


social dominance

The control of behavior of those animals lower in the hierarchy, by aggression, intelligence, or other factors of the alpha animals.

Meaning: Of Socotra, a Yemen island in the Indian Ocean at the mouth of the Gulf of Aden
Latin Pronunciation: so-koh-TRAY-nuh

Meaning: Of Socotra, a Yemen island in the Indian Ocean at the mouth of the Gulf of Aden
Latin Pronunciation: so-koh-TRAY-num

Meaning: Of Socotra, a Yemen island in the Indian Ocean at the mouth of the Gulf of Aden; possibly a variant spelling of socotrana
Latin Pronunciation: so-koh-TRY-nuh

Meaning: Of Socotra, a Yemen island in the Indian Ocean at the mouth of the Gulf of Aden
Latin Pronunciation: so-koh-TRAY-nus


sodic

Of, relating to, or containing sodium.


sod coring tool

A lawn tool which removes spikes of soil, about one half inch (1 cm) in diameter, to allow air and water to penentrate. See also: aerator.


sod planter

A lawn tool which cuts a hole of about 2 inches (5 cm.), releases the core with a hand or foot system, picks up a new sod block and inserts it.


softwood

The immature stems of woody plants. Also, term applied to conifers as opposed to the broad-leaved trees, or hardwoods.


softwood cutting

A cutting taken from a green or immature stem of a woody plant, for the purpose of propagation.


soil

1. The top layer of the earth's surface, consisting primarily of clay, sand, silt, and organic matter. 2. Any natural or synthetic substance or medium in which plants may take root and grow.


soilless mix

A potting soil that uses sand, bark, and/or other ingredients, but not any actual soil.


soil amendment

Substance added to soil to increase its nutritive value, friability, moisture retention, or some other aspect.


soil cuber (alt. soil blocker)

Hand-held device into which moist soil is packed, then released in the form of a cube or block in which a single seed is planted.


soil fixation

The conversion of a soluble substance such as phosphorus from the exchangeable form useful to plants, to a relatively insoluble form.


soil sampler

A hollow tube with a T handle, which is pressed into the soil to get a core of the horizon.


solid

Smoothly pithy, the twig center neither chambered nor hollow.

Meaning: Resembling the Solanum genus
Latin Pronunciation: so-lan-uh-SEE-uh

Meaning: The Solanum family (the name referrs to the narcotic properties of some species)
Latin Pronunciation: so-lan-AY-see-ay

Meaning: Resembling the Solanum genus
Latin Pronunciation: so-lan-uh-SEE-um

Meaning: Resembling the Solanum genus
Latin Pronunciation: so-lan-uh-SEE-us

Meaning: (for Swedish naturalist D. C. Solander)
Latin Pronunciation: Sol-land-ruh
Common Name: Chalice- vine.

Meaning: Named for Daniel Solander, 18th century Swedish-born explorer and plant collector on the Cook voyages
Latin Pronunciation: soh-LAN-dree
Alternative Self-Pronouncing:soh-LAN-dry

Meaning: Having flowers like Solanum
Latin Pronunciation: so-lan-IH-flora-uh

Meaning: Having flowers like Solanum
Latin Pronunciation: so-lan-IH-flor-um

Latin Pronunciation: sol-on-nye-nus
Meaning: Potato-like.

Meaning: (solace, the classical name)
Latin Pronunciation: Sol-lay-num
Common Name: Nightshade.Meaning: (The genus includes Eggplant, Potato, and To-mato.)

Latin Pronunciation: soh-lay-riss
Meaning: of the sun.


Latin Pronunciation: Sol-dan-nell-uh.

Meaning: Resembling Soldanella genus
Latin Pronunciation: sol-dan-el-OY-deez

Meaning: Named for Captain Joseph Francois Soleirol, who collected many Corsican plants in the early 19th century
Latin Pronunciation: so-ley-ROH-lee-uh

Meaning: Named for Captain Joseph Francois Soleirol, who collected many Corsican plants in the early 19th century
Latin Pronunciation: so-ley-ROH-lee-eye

Meaning: Resembles pipes
Latin Pronunciation: sol-en-OP-sis

Meaning: Pipe stamens
Latin Pronunciation: sol-en-oh-STEM-on


solid

Smoothly pithy, the twig center neither chambered nor hollow.

Meaning: Dense, solid
Latin Pronunciation: SOL-id-uh

Meaning: Dense, solid
Latin Pronunciation: SOL-id-um

Meaning: (to strengthen, as to supposed medicinal properties)
Latin Pronunciation: Sol-id-day-goh
Common Name: Goldenrod.

Latin Pronunciation: so/-id-us
Meaning: solid (not hollow).

Meaning: Alone
Latin Pronunciation: sol-ih-TAR-ee-a


solitary

Borne singly or alone; not in clusters.

Meaning: Named for Dr. Salvador Soliva, 18th century physician to the Spanish court
Latin Pronunciation: SOL-ih-vuh

Meaning: (for English botanist Richard Solly)
Latin Pronunciation: Sol-lee-uh
Common Name: Australian Blue-bell Creeper.

Meaning: Pertaining to midsummer (solstice)
Latin Pronunciation: sol-stee-shee-AL-lee


solutio (abr. sol)

Latin term for a solution.

Meaning: Pertaining to midsummer (solstice)
Latin Pronunciation: sol-stee-shee-AL-liss

Meaning: Of or from Somalia, Africa; sometimes spelled somaliensis
Latin Pronunciation: soh-mal-EN-sis

Meaning: Of or from Somalia, Africa; sometimes spelled somaliense
Latin Pronunciation: soh-mal-EN-see

Meaning: Of or from Somalia, Africa; sometimes spelled somalense
Latin Pronunciation: soh-mal-ee-EN-see


somatic

Belonging to the vegetative part of a plant as opposed to the reproductive.

Meaning: Of or from Somalia, Africa; sometimes spelled somalensis
Latin Pronunciation: soh-mal-ee-EN-sis

Meaning: Sleep-bringing, referring to narcotic properties
Latin Pronunciation: som-NEE-fer-uh
Alternative Self-Pronouncing:som-NIF-er-uh

Meaning: Sleep-bringing, referring to narcotic properties
Latin Pronunciation: som-NEE-fer-um
Alternative Self-Pronouncing:som-NIF-er-um

Latin Pronunciation: som-nif-er-us
Meaning: sleep in ducing.

Meaning: Having leaves like Sonchus (Sow Thistle)
Latin Pronunciation: son-chi-FOH-lee-uh

Meaning: From the Greek sonchos, used for Sowthistle
Latin Pronunciation: SON-chus

Meaning: Of or from Sonoma (region of California, U.S.)
Latin Pronunciation: so-nom-EN-sis

Meaning: Of or from the Arizona-Sonora Desert (U.S.)
Alternative Meaning:soh-noh-REN-see

Meaning: Of or from the Arizona-Sonora Desert (U.S.)
Alternative Meaning:soh-noh-REN-sis


Latin Pronunciation: Sof-foh-ruh.

Alternative Meaning:A trigeneric hybrid of Sophronitis, Laelia and Cattleya; often abbreviated as Slc
Alternative Self-Pronouncing:so-fro-lay-lee-oh-KAT-lee-uh

Meaning: (modest, at least as com-pared with many other Orchids)
Latin Pronunciation: Sof-ron-nye-tiss.

soralium (pl. soralia)

A clump of soredia.

Meaning: From the Greek sophron (chaste, modest, small)
Latin Pronunciation: so-fro-NY-tiss

Meaning: (for leaf resemblance to Sorbus)
Latin Pronunciation: Sor-bay-ree-uh
Common Name: False-spirea.

Meaning: From the Latin sorbum, referring to its resemblance to Sorbus (Mountain Ash genus)
Latin Pronunciation: sor-BAY-ree-uh

Meaning: Having leaves like those in the Sorbus genus
Latin Pronunciation: sor-bee-FOH-lee-um

Meaning: Having leaves like those in the Sorbus genus
Latin Pronunciation: sor-bee-FOH-lee-uh

Latin Pronunciation: sorb-if-foh-lee-us
Meaning: with Ash (Sorbus)-like leaves.

Meaning: (the classical name)
Latin Pronunciation: Sor-bus
Common Name: Mountain-ash.

Meaning: Dirty; soiled
Latin Pronunciation: SOR-deh-dah

Meaning: Dirty; soiled
Latin Pronunciation: SOR-deh-dum

Latin Pronunciation: sord-id-us
Meaning: foul (appearance, odor).


soredium (pl. soredia)

A microscopic clump of agal cells surrounded by the hyphae of fungi and erupting at the surface of the thallus.


soredium (pl. soredia)

A microscopic clump of agal cells surrounded by the hyphae of fungi and erupting at the surface of the thallus.

Meaning: Literally, a "poor imitation of Sorghum", referring to its similarity to Sorghum
Latin Pronunciation: sor-GAS-trum

Meaning: From the Italian sorgo, meaning a tall cereal grass
Latin Pronunciation: SOR-gum

Meaning: Of sister
Latin Pronunciation: so-ROR-ee-um

Meaning: Of sister
Latin Pronunciation: so-ROR-ee-uh

Meaning: Of sister
Latin Pronunciation: so-ROR-ee-us


sorus (pl. sori)

An assemblage of sporangia; a fruit dot.


sorus (pl. sori)

An assemblage of sporangia; a fruit dot.

Meaning: Hybrid named for Etienne Soulange-Bodin, 19th century French cavaly officer and Director of the Royal Institute of Horticulture; usually written as x soulangeana
Latin Pronunciation: soo-lan-jee-AH-na
Alternative Self-Pronouncing:soo-lan-jee-AY-na

Meaning: Hybrid named for Etienne Soulange-Bodin, 19th century French cavaly officer and Director of the Royal Institute of Horticulture; usually written as x soulangiana
Latin Pronunciation: soo-lan-jee-AH-na
Alternative Self-Pronouncing:soo-lan-jee-AY-na

Meaning: Named after James Sowerby, 19th century botanical artist and engraver of plates for flowering plants for numerous British botanical publications
Latin Pronunciation: so-er-BEE-uh

Meaning: Named for Edouard Spach,19th century Alsatian (French) botanist
Latin Pronunciation: spak-ee-AY-nuh


absorption spectrum

A graph of the amount of light a substance absorbs, plotted as a function of energy, frequency, or wavelength.

Meaning: Named for Edouard Spach,19th century Alsatian (French) botanist
Latin Pronunciation: spak-ee-AY-num

Meaning: Named for Edouard Spach,19th century Alsatian (French) botanist
Latin Pronunciation: spak-ee-AY-nus

Meaning: Named for Edouard Spach,19th century Alsatian (French) botanist
Latin Pronunciation: SPAK-ee-eye


spade

A digging implement, foot powered, usually of heavier construction than a shovel and often with a flat end.


spacing

Measured distance between the center of one plant and the center of the next closest ones.

Meaning: Date-colored; dark chestnut brown
Latin Pronunciation: spay-DIK-ee-ah
Alternative Self-Pronouncing:spay-DEE-see-uh

Meaning: Date-colored; dark chestnut brown
Latin Pronunciation: spay-DIK-ee-um
Alternative Self-Pronouncing:spay-DEE-see-um

Latin Pronunciation: spay-diss-ee-us
Meaning: with a spadix.


spadix

A flower spike with a fleshy axis, usually enclosed in a spathe.

Meaning: Shaped like a spadix (a clublike spike with tiny flowers and often enclosed within a sheath-like spathe)
Latin Pronunciation: spay-dik-ih-FOR-mis

Meaning: (for Swedish naturalist A.Sparmann)
Latin Pronunciation: Spahr-mann-ee-uh.

Meaning: From the Greek sparganion, a name used by Dioscorides
Latin Pronunciation: spar-GAH-nee-um

Meaning: (a tearing, as to torn-appear-ing spathe)
Latin Pronunciation: Spuh-rax-iss
Common Name: Wand- flower.

Meaning: Named for Dr. Andreas Sparmann, 19th century Swedish botanist who collected plants in South Africa
Latin Pronunciation: spar-MAN-ee-uh

Meaning: Sparse flowers
Latin Pronunciation: spar-SIF-lor-uh
Alternative Self-Pronouncing:spar-see-FLOR-uh

Meaning: Sparse flowers
Latin Pronunciation: spar-SIF-lor-um
Alternative Self-Pronouncing:spar-see-FLOR-um

Meaning: Prefix meaning sparse
Latin Pronunciation: spar-see

Latin Pronunciation: spar-sif-foh-lee-us
Meaning: few- leaved.

Meaning: Sparse leaves
Latin Pronunciation: spar-see-FOH-lee-uh

Meaning: Sparse leaves
Latin Pronunciation: spar-see-FOH-lee-um

Latin Pronunciation: spar-sus
Meaning: scanty, few (parts).

Meaning: Sparse leaves
Latin Pronunciation: spar-see-FOH-lee-us

Meaning: Resembling Spartium (genus name for a grass used for weaving)
Latin Pronunciation: SPAR-tee-uh

Latin Pronunciation: spart-ee-us
Meaning: pertaining to Broom.

Meaning: Resembling Spartium (genus name for a grass used for weaving)
Latin Pronunciation: SPAR-tee-um

Meaning: From the Greek meaning a cord made from this grass
Latin Pronunciation: spar-TEE-nuh

Meaning: From the Greek, meaning a cord made from this grass
Latin Pronunciation: spar-TIN-ay

Meaning: Resembles Spartium, a genus name from the Greek sparton, a kind of grass used for weaving and rope-making
Latin Pronunciation: spar-tee-OY-dees


spartoid

Rush-like, but sharp and rigid.

Meaning: (from the classical name) - - Spahr - tee - urn
Common Name: Spanish Broom, Weavers Broom.

spasmolytic

Describes an herbal preparation that can ease cramps or spasms.

Meaning: Prefix and suffix meaning spathes
Latin Pronunciation: SPATH-uh


spathaceous

Resembling or having a spathe.

Latin Pronunciation: spath-ay-see-us
Meaning: with a

Latin Pronunciation: spath-yew-lay-tus
Meaning: spoon-shaped (spatulate).

Meaning: With a spathe
Latin Pronunciation: spath-ay-SEE-uh


spathe

A sheathing bract or pair of bracts partly enclosing an inflorescence and especially a spadix on the same axis.


spatheole

A small or secondary spathe.


spathiform

Shaped like a spathe.

Meaning: (spathe-leaf, for leaf like spathe)
Latin Pronunciation: Spath-if-fifl-um.

Meaning: Resembles spathes, referring to the flower
Latin Pronunciation: spath-OH-dee-uh

Meaning: With a small spathe
Latin Pronunciation: spath-yoo-LAY-tum

Meaning: (spathe-tongue, as to lip shape)
Latin Pronunciation: Spath-oh-glot-iss.

Meaning: With a small spathe
Latin Pronunciation: spath-yoo-LAY-tuh

Meaning: With a small spathe
Latin Pronunciation: spath-yoo-LAY-tus

Meaning: Spatula-shaped leaves
Latin Pronunciation: spath-yoo-lif-FOH-lee-uh

Meaning: Spatula-shaped leaves
Latin Pronunciation: spath-yoo-lif-FOH-lee-um

Meaning: Spatula-shaped leaves
Latin Pronunciation: spath-yoo-lif-FOH-lee-us

Meaning: suffix meaning spathes
Latin Pronunciation: SPATH-us


spatulate (alt. spathulate)

Gradually narrowing downward from a rounded summit; spoon-shaped.

Meaning: Like a spoon
Latin Pronunciation: spat-yoo-LAY-tuh

Meaning: Like a spoon
Latin Pronunciation: spat-yoo-LAY-tum

Meaning: Like a spoon
Latin Pronunciation: spat-yoo-LAY-tus

Meaning: suffix meaning spathes
Latin Pronunciation: SPATH-um


species diversity

Almost the same as species richness, but in more technical literature, an ecosystem that is said to be more diverse if the species present have equal population sizes and less diverse if many species are rare and some are very common.


species (abr. sp., pl. spp.)

A fundamental category of taxonomic classification that ranks below a genus and above subspecies; a population or series of populations whose individuals have the potential to freely breed with one another and that is discontinuous in variation from other populations or series of populations. The plural abreviation "spp." is usually used to refer to all the individual species within a genus, e.g.,Cornus spp. refers to all the plants within the dogwood genus.


specimen (pl. specimens)

1. Item considered typical of its class, e.g., an herbarium specimen. 2. Plant grown for landscape exhibition, e.g., a specimen tree.


herbarium specimens (alt. herbarium samples, alt. herbarium mounts)

Pressed dried plants fastened to sheets of paper which serve as permanent records of a species as it appeared at a given time and place.


species richness

The number of species within a region. See also: species diversity.


specimen preparation

The collection, selection, arrangement, pressing, drying, and mounting of a plant for an herbarium specimen, allowing many specimens to be stored in minimal space.

Meaning: Showy, spectacular
Latin Pronunciation: spee-see-OH-suh


specimen tree

A tree placed so people can gain the greatest enjoyment for the color, texture, scent, or other pleasures it provides.

Meaning: Most showy
Latin Pronunciation: spee-kee-oh-SIS-ee-mum
Alternative Self-Pronouncing:spee-see-oh-SIS-ee-mum

Meaning: Showy, spectacular
Latin Pronunciation: spee-see-OH-sum

Meaning: Most showy
Latin Pronunciation: spee-kee-oh-SIS-ee-muh
Alternative Self-Pronouncing:spee-see-oh-SIS-ee-muh

Latin Pronunciation: spee-see-oh-siss-im-us
Meaning: very showy.

Meaning: Spectacular
Latin Pronunciation: speck-TAB-ih-lee

Latin Pronunciation: spee - see - oh - sus
Meaning: showy, handsome.

Meaning: From the Greek specul? (mirror) and anthos (flower)
Latin Pronunciation: spek-yoo-LAN-thus

Meaning: (for Venus' looking-glass)
Latin Pronunciation: Spek-yew-lay-ree-uh
Common Name: Venus Looking-glassMeaning: (S. speculum-Veneris).

Latin Pronunciation: spek-tab-il-iss
Meaning: exception ally showy.

Meaning: From the Greek specul? (mirror) and anthos (flower)
Latin Pronunciation: spek-yoo-LAN-tha

Meaning: Venus' mirror or looking-glass
Latin Pronunciation: SPEK-yoo-lum VEN-er-iss

Meaning: Mirror
Latin Pronunciation: SPEK-yoo-lum

Meaning: Named for James Speden, modern-day explorer in New Zealand
Latin Pronunciation: sped-EN-ee-eye

Meaning: From the Latin spargere (to scatter)
Latin Pronunciation: SPER-guh-la

Meaning: From the Latin spargere (to scatter)
Latin Pronunciation: sper-guh-LAY-ree-a

Meaning: Mirror
Latin Pronunciation: SPEK-yoo-li


spermatium (pl. spermatia)

The nonmotile male cell of red seaweeds; also used for similar cells in fungi.


Spermatophyta

A major taxonomic division containing all plants which reproduce by seed, subdivided into Gymnospermae and Angiospermae.


spermatophyte (syn. seed plant)

Any plant of the division Spermatophyta, the higher plants that produce seeds, including the gymnosperms and angiosperms.


spermatocyte

A cell which gives rise to sperm cells.


spermatozoid

A motile ciliated male reproductive cell.

Meaning: Appearing to be dead
Latin Pronunciation: spass-el-LAH-tuh

Meaning: Appearing to be dead
Latin Pronunciation: spass-el-LAH-tum

Latin Pronunciation: sfass-el-lay-tus
Meaning: withered.

Meaning: (globe-Mallow)
Latin Pronunciation: Sfeer ral-see-uh
Common Name: Globe-mallow.

Meaning: Spherical; round
Latin Pronunciation: SFAY-rik-uh

Meaning: Spherical; round
Latin Pronunciation: SFAY-rik-um

Meaning: Prefix meaning round or globe shaped
Latin Pronunciation: sfay-ro

Latin Pronunciation: sfeer-ik-us
Meaning: spherical.

Latin Pronunciation: sfeer - ok - karp - us
Meaning: round-fruited.

Meaning: Sphere or round head
Latin Pronunciation: sfay-ro-SEF-uh-luh
Alternative Self-Pronouncing:sfeer-oh-KEF-uh-luh

Meaning: Rounded fruit
Latin Pronunciation: sfay-ro-KAR-puh
Alternative Self-Pronouncing:sfee-ro-KAR-puh

Meaning: Sphere or round head
Latin Pronunciation: sfay-ro-SEF-uh-lon
Alternative Self-Pronouncing:sfeer-oh-SEF-uh-lon

Meaning: Sphere or round head
Latin Pronunciation: sfay-ro-SEF-uh-lum
Alternative Self-Pronouncing:sfeer-oh-SEF-uh-lum

Latin Pronunciation: sfeer-oh-sef-al-us
Meaning: round-headed.

Latin Pronunciation: sfeer-royd-ee-us
Meaning: sphere

Meaning: From Greek: sphaira (ball or sphere) and lobos (pod), alluding to the globular fruit
Latin Pronunciation: sfeer-oh-LOH-bee-um

Meaning: From the Greek sphaero (sphere) and physa (bladder), referring to the rounded, bladder-like seed pods
Latin Pronunciation: sfay-ro-FY-suh

Latin Pronunciation: sfeer-oh-stak-ee-us
Meaning: round-spiked.

Meaning: From the Latin sphagnos (astringent), a moss whose use dates back to the 4th century when it was used as a prescribed medication
Latin Pronunciation: SFAG-num

Meaning: Rounded fruit
Latin Pronunciation: sfay-ro-KAR-pum
Alternative Self-Pronouncing:sfee-ro-KAR-pum

Meaning: Sphagnum-dweller
Latin Pronunciation: sfag-net-TEE-koh-luh


sphagnum moss

Bog mosses that are often used as soil additives and packing material because of their ability to retain moisture. See also: peat moss.

Meaning: From the Greek sphen (wedge) and phyllon (leaf)
Latin Pronunciation: sfen-oh-FIL-um

Meaning: Resembling Sphalmanthus
Latin Pronunciation: sfal-man-THOY-deez

Meaning: From the Greek sphen (wedge) and phyllon (leaf)
Latin Pronunciation: sfen-oh-FIL-uh


spherical

Nearly round.

Meaning: Ear of wind
Latin Pronunciation: SPIK-uh VEN-ti

Meaning: From the Greek sphen (wedge) and phyllon (leaf)
Latin Pronunciation: sfen-oh-FIL-us

Meaning: Spike, ears like corn
Latin Pronunciation: SPEE-kuh

Meaning: Tufted, having spikes
Latin Pronunciation: SPIK-ant

Meaning: Grows ears (like corn), in spikes
Latin Pronunciation: spi-KAH-tuh
Alternative Self-Pronouncing:spy-KAY-tuh

Meaning: Grows ears (like corn), in spikes
Latin Pronunciation: spi-KAH-tum
Alternative Self-Pronouncing:spy-KAY-tum


spicate

Arranged in or resembling a spike.

Latin Pronunciation: spye-kay-tus
Meaning: spiked; or with flower spikes, raceme-like clusters of stalkless flowers (spicate); spike-like,

Meaning: Bearing spikes
Latin Pronunciation: spik-EE-ger-uh


spiciform

Spike-like.

Latin Pronunciation: spye - sij - er - us
Meaning: having spikes.

Meaning: Spiked leaves
Latin Pronunciation: spik-yoo-lee-FOH-lee-uh


spiculate

Having fine fleshy points.

Meaning: Spiked leaves
Latin Pronunciation: spik-yoo-lee-FOH-lee-um

Latin Pronunciation: spik-yew-lif-foh-lee-us
Meaning: sharp pointed-leaved.


spider mite (syn. red spider)

Any of several small, red, web-spinning mites of the family Tetranychidae that feed on and damage leaves.


spike

A form of simple inflorescence with the flowers sessile or nearly so upon a more or less elongated common axis.

Meaning: Bearing spikes
Latin Pronunciation: spik-EE-ger-um


spikelet (syn. earlet)

A small or secondary spike, most often refiring to those forming the inflorescence of grasses.

Meaning: (for Dutch botanist A. van der Spigel)
Latin Pronunciation: Spye-jeel-ee-uh
Common Name: Pink-root.

spike harrows

A field implement with spikes that breaks up clods and levels soil.

Meaning: From the Greek spilos, (spot) and anthos, (flower); referring to the brown disc flowers of some species
Latin Pronunciation: spil-ANTH-eez

Meaning: From the Greek spilo (a spot) and phaeum dusky)
Latin Pronunciation: spee-lo-FAY-um
Alternative Self-Pronouncing:Spy-lo-fay-um

Meaning: From the Greek spilos (stain ) and xenos (host), referring to the spotted base of tepals in some species
Latin Pronunciation: spil-oh-ZEE-nee


spindle-shaped

Same as fusiform.

Meaning: (spiny, as to fruit)
Latin Pronunciation: Spin nay-shee-uh
Common Name: Spinach.

spine

A sharp woody or rigid outgrowth from a stem, leaf, or other plant part.

Meaning: Becoming spiny
Latin Pronunciation: spy-NES-enz

Latin Pronunciation: spin-if-fex
Meaning: spiny, prickly.

Meaning: Having spiny flowers
Latin Pronunciation: spin-ih-FLOR-a


spinescent

1. Having spines. 2. Terminating in a spine. 3. Modified to form a spine.

Meaning: Having spiny flowers
Latin Pronunciation: spin-ih-FLOR-us

Meaning: With spines
Latin Pronunciation: spy-NO-suh

Meaning: Having spiny flowers
Latin Pronunciation: spin-ih-FLOR-um


spinose

Spine-like, or having spines.

Meaning: Most spiny, spiniest
Latin Pronunciation: spin-oh-SIS-ee-muh

Meaning: Most spiny, spiniest
Latin Pronunciation: spin-oh-SIS-ee-mum

Meaning: With spines
Latin Pronunciation: spy-NO-sum

Latin Pronunciation: spye-noh-siss-im-us
Meaning: very spiny.

Latin Pronunciation: spye-noh-sus
Meaning: with many spines.


spinulate

Having spinules.


spinule

A minute spine or spine-like process.

Meaning: Bearing small spines
Latin Pronunciation: spin-yoo-LIF-er-a

Meaning: Bearing small spines
Latin Pronunciation: spin-yoo-LIF-er-um


spinulose

Thorny; set with small spines.

Latin Pronunciation: spin-yew-/if-er-us
Meaning: having small spines.

Meaning: Spiny
Latin Pronunciation: spin-yoo-LOH-sum

Latin Pronunciation: spin-yew-/oh-sus
Meaning: small- or soft-spined.

Meaning: (wreath or garland, for which some species may have been used)
Latin Pronunciation: Spye-ree-uh
Common Name: Spirea.

Meaning: Spiralled
Latin Pronunciation: spir-AH-lee
Alternative Self-Pronouncing:spir-AH-lay

Meaning: Spiny
Latin Pronunciation: spin-yoo-LOH-suh

Meaning: (coil-flower, as to twisted stalks)
Latin Pronunciation: Spye - ranth - eez
Common Name: Ladies- tresses.

Latin Pronunciation: spye - rell - us
Meaning: (parts in) small spirals.

Latin Pronunciation: spye - ray - liss
Meaning: spiral (arrangement).

Meaning: From Greek speira (spiral) and delos (clear), referring to spiral vessels clearly visible through the whole plant
Latin Pronunciation: spy-roh-DEL-uh

Latin Pronunciation: sp/en-denz
Meaning: showy.

Meaning: (spiral-thread, as to stamens)
Latin Pronunciation: Spye-ron-neem-uh.

Meaning: Splendid, bright, glittering
Latin Pronunciation: SPLEN-did-uh

Meaning: Splendid, bright, glittering
Latin Pronunciation: SPLEN-did-um

Latin Pronunciation: splen-did-diss-im-us
Meaning: most showy.


spired

Having a crown with several points.


splitting maul

An axe with a broad, heavy head, shaped into a wide nonstick wedge.

Latin Pronunciation: splend-id-us
Meaning: handsome, showy.

Meaning: From the Greek spodios (ash-colored, gray) and pogon (beard); referring to the spikelet hairs
Latin Pronunciation: spoh-dee-oh-POH-gon


spoils

Soil from stream or drain bottoms dredged out when the channel was made deeper.

Meaning: Greek name for plum, assigned to this genus of tropical trees because of the fruit
Latin Pronunciation: SPON-dee-as

Meaning: The Greek word for sponge
Latin Pronunciation: SPUN-gee-uh


sporangium (pl. sporangia)

A tiny globe in which the spores are produced; often applied to the capsule, but by some authors restricted to the spore sac, or inner sac of the capsule containing the spores.

Meaning: Spongy
Latin Pronunciation: spon-jee-OH-sum


sporangiophore

A specialized stalk bearing a sporangium.

Meaning: Spontaneous
Latin Pronunciation: spon-TAY-nee-uh

Meaning: Spontaneous
Latin Pronunciation: spon-TAY-nee-um


sporangium (pl. sporangia)

A tiny globe in which the spores are produced; often applied to the capsule, but by some authors restricted to the spore sac, or inner sac of the capsule containing the spores.


spore

The reproductive organ in cryptogams which in function corresponds to a seed but possesses no embryo.

Meaning: From the Greek sporos (seed) and bolos (throwing), referring to the ease with which the ripe seed is released
Latin Pronunciation: spor-ROB-oh-lus


sporocarp

The fruit cases of certain cryptogams containing sporangia or spores.


sporogenesis

Reproduction by means of spores.


sporecase

Same as sporangium; the case in which the spores are borne.


sporogenous

Describes cells or tissues in which spores are formed.


sporophyte (syn. sporophore)

1. The spore-bearing part or generation. In mosses, it consists of the seta and capsule and constitutes the so-called fruit. In ferns, the conspicuous plants that bear spores.


spororogonium

The sporophyte or spore-bearing part of the moss.


sporophyte (syn. sporophore)

1. The spore-bearing part or generation. In mosses, it consists of the seta and capsule and constitutes the so-called fruit. In ferns, the conspicuous plants that bear spores.


sporophyll

A leaf bearing spores.


sport

An abrupt, naturally occurring genetic change resulting in a branch that differs in appearance from the rest of the plant, or, a plant derived by propagation from such a genetically changed branch.


species (abr. sp., pl. spp.)

A fundamental category of taxonomic classification that ranks below a genus and above subspecies; a population or series of populations whose individuals have the potential to freely breed with one another and that is discontinuous in variation from other populations or series of populations. The plural abreviation "spp." is usually used to refer to all the individual species within a genus, e.g.,Cornus spp. refers to all the plants within the dogwood genus.


spreading

Having a horizontally branching habit.

Meaning: (for botanical artist Isaac Sprague)
Latin Pronunciation: Sprayg-ee-uh.
Meaning: (for German botanist J. H. von Sprekelsen)
Latin Pronunciation: Sprek-keel-ee-uh
Common Name: Jacobean-lily, St. James-lily.

sprig

A small part of a plant, such as stolons used for propagations, twigs bearing flowers, etc.

Meaning: Named for Herr Sprenger, who collected the plant in Natal Provice, South Africa in the late 1800s for his employer, Dammann & Co, an Italian seed company.
Latin Pronunciation: SPRENG-er-ee


spring wood

Wood which is formed during the period of rapid growth in the spring, appearing lighter in color than the wood formed later as the growth slows down.

Meaning: Named for Richard Spruce, 19th century English botanist
Latin Pronunciation: sproos-ee-AY-nuh

Meaning: Named for Richard Spruce, 19th century English botanist
Latin Pronunciation: sproos-ee-AY-num

Meaning: Named for Richard Spruce, 19th century English botanist
Latin Pronunciation: SPROOS-ee-eye

Meaning: Spruce-like
Latin Pronunciation: Named for Richard Spruce, 19th century English botanist


spreader

1. A lawn cart that applies seed, fertilizer, etc. 2. A large wagon used on organic farms to apply manure to the fields.


spud (alt. ice spud)

A tool shaped like a flat-ended oar that is used to chop a hole through ice for fishing or studying underwater biology, but which may also be used to clear ice from sidewalks, cut sod or roots, edge sidewalks, etc.

Latin Pronunciation: spew-may-ree-us
Meaning: frothy, with froth.

Meaning: False
Latin Pronunciation: SPUR-ee-um

Meaning: False
Latin Pronunciation: SPUR-ee-uh

Latin Pronunciation: spew-ree-us
Meaning: false.


spur

A hollow sac-like or tubular extension of some part of a blossom, usually nectariferous. Also, a short, slow-growing branchlet.


spurred

Calcarate; refers to a flower with tubular projections from the petals or sepals, usually with nectar glands.


sqarulose

Diminutively squarrose.

Latin Pronunciation: skway-lenz
Meaning: daubed, filthy- looking.

Meaning: From the Greek, meaning tiny basket
Latin Pronunciation: spy-RID-ee-um


spur branch

A stubby branchlet with densely crowded leaves and leaf scars.

Meaning: Stiff or rough; neglected, dirty
Latin Pronunciation: SKWA-lee-duh

Meaning: Stiff or rough; neglected, dirty
Latin Pronunciation: SKWA-lee-dum

Meaning: Scaly
Latin Pronunciation: SKWA-ma-tuh

Latin Pronunciation: skwa/-id-us
Meaning: filthy-looking or smelling.


squamate (alt. squamose, alt. squamous)

Covered with scales.

Latin Pronunciation: skwam - may -tus
Meaning: with scale-like leaves or bracts (squamate).

Meaning: Scaly
Latin Pronunciation: SKWA-ma-tuh

Latin Pronunciation: skwam-mij-er-us
Meaning: scaly.

Meaning: Scaly
Latin Pronunciation: skwa-MO-sum

Meaning: Scaly
Latin Pronunciation: skwa-MO-suh

Latin Pronunciation: skwam - moh - sus
Meaning: with many scales.


squamulate

Having squamules.

Meaning: With little scales
Latin Pronunciation: skwa-mul-LAY-tuh

Meaning: Bearing scales
Latin Pronunciation: skwam-EE-ger-uh

Meaning: With little scales
Latin Pronunciation: skwa-mul-LAY-tum


squamule

Among lichens, a small scale-like thallus which lacks a lower cortex and rhizines.


squamulose

Having small scales.


squarrose

Turned back at a right angle or more sharply, as the tip of a phyllary.

Meaning: Having scales or scale-like overlapping leaves or bracts
Alternative Meaning:With parts spreading or recurved at the ends
Latin Pronunciation: skwa-RO-sum

Latin Pronunciation: skwar - roh - sus
Meaning: with spread or recurved parts.


subspecies (abr. ssp.)

The rank of taxa below species but above variety; a subdivision of a species whose members have certain hereditary characteristics distinct from other populations of that species. A subspecies is added to the specific binomial and preceded by "ssp.," such asobtusifolia in the epithetGrevillea thelemanniana ssp.obtusifolia.


stability

Resistance to variation in populations and disturbances, resulting in the persistence of community composition over long periods of time.

Meaning: Having scales or scale-like overlapping leaves or bracts
Alternative Meaning:With parts spreading or recurved at the ends
Latin Pronunciation: skwa-RO-suh

Meaning: (spike, not of apparent perti-nence)
Latin Pronunciation: Stay-kiss
Common Name: Betony, Wound- wort.
Meaning: (spike-tail, for flowering character)
Latin Pronunciation: Stay-kee-yew-rus.

staking

Providing support for newly-planted trees or tall plants by tying the plant to one or more stakes planted beside and parallel to the plant.

Meaning: From the Greek stachys (ear of corn) and tarphys (thick), referring to the thick, spikey flowers
Latin Pronunciation: stay-kee-tar-FEE-tuh
Alternative Self-Pronouncing:stak-ee-tar-FEE-tuh


staddle

A foundation of trunk and main branches, either of rootstock or stembuilder, for grafting.

Meaning: Named for Christian Ernst Stahl, 19th century German botanist and professor at Jena
Latin Pronunciation: STAHL-ee-eye


stalk

A short, supporting axis.

Meaning: Spike-leaved
Latin Pronunciation: stak-ee-oh-FIL-um
Alternative Self-Pronouncing:stay-kee--oh-FY-lum


stalked

Joined to an axis with a stalk.


stamen

One of the male, pollen-bearing organs of the flower.

Meaning: With noticeable stamens
Latin Pronunciation: stam-IN-ee-uh


staminal

Attached to or referring to the stamen.


staminate

With stamens and without pistils.

Meaning: With noticeable stamens
Latin Pronunciation: stam-IN-ee-um

Latin Pronunciation: stam - min - ee - us
Meaning: with prominent stamens.


standard (syn. banner)

1. A plant with a strong vertical stem, particularly one that would not normally grow that way; a vine or shrub trained as a tree with a single trunk and a more or less spherical top. 2. Uppermost, usually erect, petals of some flowers; the upper dilated petal of a papilionaceous corolla.


staminoid

A pollenless stamen.


staminode (syn. staminodium, syn. staminoide)

A sterile stamen, or any structure without anther corresponding to a stamen.

Meaning: Named for Johon Standish, 19th century English nurseryman; helped raise the Asian plants introduced by Fortune
Latin Pronunciation: stan-DEE-shee-eye

Meaning: Named for Paul Carpenter Standley, 20th century American botanist specializing in neotropical plants
Latin Pronunciation: stand-lee-AY-nus

Meaning: Named for Paul Carpenter Standley, 20th century American botanist specializing in neotropical plants
Latin Pronunciation: stand-lee-AY-na

Meaning: Named for Paul Carpenter Standley, 20th century American botanist specializing in neotropical plants
Latin Pronunciation: stand-lee-AY-num

Meaning: Named for Paul Carpenter Standley, 20th century American botanist specializing in neotropical plants
Latin Pronunciation: STAND-lee-eye

Meaning: Named for Dr. Max Stanger, German surveyor of Natal province in South Africa
Latin Pronunciation: stan-GER-ee-uh

Meaning: Named for Lord Edward Smith Stanley, 18th century ornithologist, the 13th Earl of Derby and president of the Linnean Society
Latin Pronunciation: STAN-lee-yuh

Latin Pronunciation: stanz
Meaning: upright, erect.

Meaning: (for the Earl of Stanhope)
Latin Pronunciation: Stan-hoh-pee-uh.
Meaning: (for Dutch physician-botanist J. B. van Stapel)
Latin Pronunciation: Stap-peel-ee-uh
Common Name: Carrion-flower.

Meaning: Having a shape similar to Stapelia, (genus named for Johannes Bodaeus van Stapel, 17th century Dutch botanist and physician); also spelled stapeliiformis
Latin Pronunciation: sta-pel-ee-ay-FORM-iss

Meaning: Having a shape similar to Stapelia (genus named for Johannes Bodaeus van Stapel, 17th century Dutch botanist); also spelled stapeliiformis and stapeliaeformis
Latin Pronunciation: sta-pel-ee-FORM-ss

Meaning: Resembling Stapelia (genus named for Johannes Bodaeus van Stapel, 17th century Dutch botanist and physician)
Latin Pronunciation: sta-pel-ee-OY-deez

Meaning: Having a shape similar to Stapelia, (genus named for Johannes Bodaeus van Stapel, 17th century Dutch botanist and physician)
Latin Pronunciation: sta-pel-ee-ih-FORM-iss

Meaning: (cluster-of-grapes, for fruit-ing habit)
Latin Pronunciation: Staf-il-lee-uh
Common Name: Bladder- nut.

Meaning: Named for Sir George Leonard Staunton, 18th century Secretary to the first British embassy to China
Latin Pronunciation: stawn-TON-ee-eye


Latin Pronunciation: Stat-iss-ee
Common Name: This genus is now superseded by Armeria and Limo-nium.
Meaning: (for Sir G. L. Staunton)
Latin Pronunciation: Ston-toh-nee-uh.

Meaning: Stapelia-flowered
Latin Pronunciation: sta-pel-ee-ANTH-us

Meaning: Named for Frank Stayner, former curator of the Karoo National Botanical Gardens in South Africa
Latin Pronunciation: STAY-ner-ee

Meaning: Overlapping spine
Latin Pronunciation: staw-ra-KANTH-uh

Meaning: Named for Dr. Cornelius Gisjbert Gerrit Java van Steenis, 20th century Australian botanist
Latin Pronunciation: steen-IS-ee-uh


stegocarpous

Having the capsule operculate.

Meaning: (sterile-thread, as to sta-minodes)
Latin Pronunciation: Style-roh-neem-uh
Common Name: Loose- strife.

stele

The axial vascular and associated tissues from the endodermis inward.

Meaning: Star-like
Latin Pronunciation: stell-AIR-ee

Meaning: (star-like, as to flowers)
Latin Pronunciation: Stel-lay-ree-uh.

Latin Pronunciation: stel-lay-riss
Meaning: starry, star-like.

Meaning: With spreading, star-like rays
Latin Pronunciation: stell-AY-tuh

Meaning: With spreading, star-like rays
Latin Pronunciation: stell-AY-tum

Meaning: Named for Georg Willhelm Steller, 18th century German naturalist
Latin Pronunciation: stell-er-ee-AH-nuh

Meaning: Bearing stars
Latin Pronunciation: STEL-lig-er


stellate (syn. stelliform)

Star-shaped.

Latin Pronunciation: stel-lay-tus
Meaning: star-like (stellate).

Meaning: Bearing stars
Latin Pronunciation: stel-LIG-er-um

Meaning: Bearing stars
Latin Pronunciation: stel-LIG-er-uh

Meaning: Starry-haired
Latin Pronunciation: stel-ih-PY-la

Meaning: Starry-haired
Latin Pronunciation: stel-ih-PY-lum

Meaning: Star-like
Latin Pronunciation: stel-yoo-LAY-ta
Alternative Self-Pronouncing:stel-yoo-LAH-ta

Meaning: Star-like
Latin Pronunciation: stel-yoo-LAY-tum
Alternative Self-Pronouncing:stel-yoo-LAH-tum

Meaning: Bearing stars
Latin Pronunciation: stel-LIG-er-a

Latin Pronunciation: what star-li


stem

The main ascending axis of a plant.


stembuilder

A variety of woody plants used in a graft as intermediate stem piece to provide a strong trunk for standard trees, or to introduce resistance to disease or winter injury.

Meaning: From the Greek stemma (garland, crown) and adenos (gland)
Latin Pronunciation: stem-uh-DEE-nee-uh

Meaning: From the Greek stenos (narrow) and andros (man); hence the common name
Latin Pronunciation: sten-AN-dree-um

Meaning: From the Greek stemon (stamen), referring to the double anthers
Latin Pronunciation: stem-OH-dee-a

Meaning: Narrow flowers
Latin Pronunciation: sten-AN-tha

Meaning: Star (shaped) spines
Latin Pronunciation: stel-ih-SPIN-uh
Alternative Self-Pronouncing:stel-ih-SPY-nuh

Meaning: From the Greek stenos (narrow) and anthos (flower), referring to the narrow tepals
Latin Pronunciation: sten-ANTH-ee-um

Meaning: Narrow flowers
Latin Pronunciation: sten-AN-thum

Meaning: Narrow flowers
Latin Pronunciation: sten-AN-thus

Meaning: From the Greek stenos (narrow, narrowing)
Latin Pronunciation: sten-AR-ee-a

Meaning: (slender-Cactus)
Latin Pronunciation: Sten-oh-kak-tus.

Meaning: Narrow
Latin Pronunciation: STEN-oh

Meaning: Narrow fruit
Latin Pronunciation: sten-oh-KAR-pum

Meaning: Narrow fruit
Latin Pronunciation: sten-oh-KAR-puh

Meaning: (narrow-fruit, as to fol-licles)
Latin Pronunciation: Sten-oh-karp-us.

Meaning: Narrow head
Latin Pronunciation: sten-oh-SEF-ah-luh
Alternative Self-Pronouncing:sten-oh-KEF-ah-luh

Meaning: Narrow head
Latin Pronunciation: sten-oh-SEF-ah-lum
Alternative Self-Pronouncing:sten-oh-KEF-ah-lum

Meaning: Narrow head
Latin Pronunciation: sten-oh-SEF-ah-lus
Alternative Self-Pronouncing:sten-oh-KEF-ah-lus

Meaning: From the Greek stenos (narrow) and cereus (genus name for cactus, meaning torch)
Latin Pronunciation: sten-oh-KER-ee-us

Latin Pronunciation: row stigma.

Meaning: (narrow-tongue, as to flower lip)
Latin Pronunciation: Sten-oh-glot-iss.

Meaning: Slender-lobed
Latin Pronunciation: sten-oh-LOH-buh

Meaning: (narrow-lobe, as to fruit)
Latin Pronunciation: Sten-oh-loh-bee-um
Common Name: Yellow-bells.

Meaning: Slender-lobed
Latin Pronunciation: sten-oh-LOH-bum

Meaning: From the Greek stenos (narrow) and petalum (petal)
Latin Pronunciation: sten-oh-PET-al-uh

Meaning: From the Greek stenos (narrow) and petalum (petal)
Latin Pronunciation: sten-oh-PET-al-um

Meaning: From the Greek stenos (narrow) and -merus (part or member); referring to the finely divided leaflets
Latin Pronunciation: sten-oh-MER-uh

Latin Pronunciation: sten-oh-pet-al-us
Meaning: nar- row-petaled.

Meaning: Narrow leaves
Latin Pronunciation: sten-oh-FIL-uh

Meaning: Narrow leaves
Latin Pronunciation: sten-oh-FIL-um

Latin Pronunciation: sten-oh-fill-us
Meaning: narrow- leaved.

Meaning: Narrow-winged
Latin Pronunciation: sten-OP-ter-uh

Meaning: Narrow-winged
Latin Pronunciation: sten-OP-ter-um

Latin Pronunciation: sten-nop-ter-us
Meaning: narrow- winged.

Meaning: Narrow-nosed (or beaked)
Latin Pronunciation: sten-oh-RIN-kos
Alternative Self-Pronouncing:sten-oh-RINCH-os

Meaning: Narrow spike
Latin Pronunciation: sten-oh-STAK-ee-uh
Alternative Self-Pronouncing:sten-oh-STAY-kee-uh

Meaning: Narrow spike
Latin Pronunciation: sten-oh-STAK-ee-um
Alternative Self-Pronouncing:sten-oh-STAY-kee-um

Meaning: Narrow spike
Latin Pronunciation: sten-oh-STAK-ee-us
Alternative Self-Pronouncing:sten-oh-STAY-kee-us

Meaning: (narrow-trench, as to grooves bearing spikelets)
Latin Pronunciation: Sten-oh-taff-rum
Common Name: St. Augustine-grass.

Meaning: From the Greek stenos (slender) and skhistos (divided)
Latin Pronunciation: sten-oh-SHIS-tuh

Meaning: From the Greek stephane (wreath or crown) and cereus, a cactus
Latin Pronunciation: stef-a-no-KER-ee-us
Alternative Self-Pronouncing:stef-a-no-SER-ee-us

Meaning: (crown-stamen, as to stamen arrangement)
Latin Pronunciation: Steff - uh - nand-ruh.

Meaning: From the Greek stephane (wreath or crown) and meros (division)
Latin Pronunciation: stef-an-oh-MER-ee-a


steppe

A vast arid, usually level and grassland, particularly those of southeastern Europe and Asia and generally having extreme variations in temperature. See also: pampas, prairie.

Meaning: (crown-worthy, as to sta-men arrangement)
Latin Pronunciation: Steff-uh-noh-tiss
Common Name: Madagascar-jasmine.

Meaning: Like Sterculia (genus named for the Latin god Sterculius)
Latin Pronunciation: stur-kew-lee-AY-see-um

Meaning: Like Sterculia (genus named for the Latin god Sterculius)
Latin Pronunciation: stur-kew-lee-AY-see-us


stereids

The small thick-walled cells seen in.

Meaning: Like Sterculia (genus named for the Latin god Sterculius)
Latin Pronunciation: stur-kew-lee-AY-see-uh


sterigma (pl. sterigmata)

The spike on which a fungus spore is home.


sterigmata

The small woody stem to which the leaves of spruces and hemlocks are attached.

Meaning: Sterile
Latin Pronunciation: STER-ee-lee

Latin Pronunciation: stehr-il-iss
Meaning: infertile (sterile).

Meaning: Named after the Latin god Sterculius
Latin Pronunciation: stur-KEW-lee-uh

Meaning: From the Greek stere (solid, firm or three-dimensional) and spermos (seed)
Latin Pronunciation: ster-ee-oh-SPER-mum

Meaning: (for Bohemian Count Kaspar Sternberg)
Latin Pronunciation: Stern-berj-ee-uh.

Meaning: Named for Frederick Claude Stern, 20th century merchant banker and avid gardener
Latin Pronunciation: stern-ee-AY-nuh
Alternative Self-Pronouncing:stern-ee-AH-nuh

Meaning: Named for Frederick Claude Stern, 20th century merchant banker and avid gardener
Latin Pronunciation: stern-ee-AY-nus
Alternative Self-Pronouncing:stern-ee-AH-nus

Meaning: Named for Frederick Claude Stern, 20th century merchant banker and avid gardener
Latin Pronunciation: STERN-ee-eye

Meaning: Named for Francis Lynde Stetson, 20th century American attorney and amateur botanist
Latin Pronunciation: stet-SOHN-ee-uh

Meaning: Named for Ernst Gottlieb von Steudel, 19th century German botanist and authority on grasses
Latin Pronunciation: stew-del-ee-AH-nus

Meaning: Named for Pedro Jaime Esteve, 16th century Spanish physician and botanist
Latin Pronunciation: STEV-ee-uh
Alternative Self-Pronouncing:STEE-vee-uh

Meaning: Named for Ernst Gottlieb von Steudel, 19th century German botanist and authority on grasses
Latin Pronunciation: stew-DEL-ee-eye

Meaning: Named for Ernst Gottlieb von Steudel, 19th century German botanist and authority on grasses
Latin Pronunciation: stew-del-ee-AH-na

Meaning: Named for Ernst Gottlieb von Steudel, 19th century German botanist and authority on grasses
Latin Pronunciation: stew-del-ee-AH-num

Meaning: Resembles Stevia (genus named for Pedro Jaime Esteve, 16th century Spanish physician and botanist)
Latin Pronunciation: stev-ee-OY-deez
Alternative Self-Pronouncing:stee-vee-OY-deez

Meaning: Named for Laurence Baxter Stewart, early 20th century curator of the Royal Botanical Garden in Edinburgh
Latin Pronunciation: stew-art-ee-AH-nus

Meaning: Named for John Stewart, 3rd Earl of Bute, 18th century British politician
Latin Pronunciation: stew-ART-ee-eye

Meaning: Named for Laurence Baxter Stewart, early 20th century curator of the Royal Botanical Garden in Edinburgh
Latin Pronunciation: stew-art-ee-AH-num

Meaning: Named for Laurence Baxter Stewart, early 20th century curator of the Royal Botanical Garden in Edinburgh
Latin Pronunciation: stew-art-ee-AH-na

Meaning: (for plant patron John Stu-art, Earl of Bute)
Latin Pronunciation: Stew-art-ee-uh.

Meaning: Possibly derived from the Greek stichos, (row or line) referring to the rows of sori on the pinnules
Latin Pronunciation: STIK-er-us

Meaning: From the Greek stiktos (spotted) and kardia (heart); referring to the spotted, heart-shaped leaves
Latin Pronunciation: stik-toh-KAR-dee-uh


stichidium

A small structure ( lobe or branch) bearing tetrasporangia.

Latin Pronunciation: stye-rass-sif-lew-us
Meaning: flowing with gum (storax).

Meaning: Named for Andreas Joseph Freiherr von Stifft, 19th century Imperial Physician in Austria
Latin Pronunciation: STIFF-tee-uh


stigma

That part of a pistil through which fertilization by the pollen is affected.

Latin Pronunciation: stig-mat-ik-us
Meaning: referring to markings; also stigmas.


stigmatose

With conspicuous stamens.


stigmatic

Belonging to or characteristic of the stigma.

Meaning: From the Greek stigma (thorn, point) and phyllon (leaf); referring to the broad, leafy stigma.
Latin Pronunciation: stig-muh-FIL-on


stigonema

A filamentous blue-green algae.

Latin Pronunciation: stig - moh - sus
Meaning: much marked; also refers to stigmas.

Meaning: Named for Dr. Benjamin Stillingfleet
Latin Pronunciation: stil-LING-ee-uh

Meaning: Named for Dr. Jacob Davis Babcock Stillman, 19th century American botanist and viticulturist after moving from New York to California
Latin Pronunciation: still-MAN-ee-eye


stilt-roots

Adventitious support roots.

Meaning: From the Latin stimulus
Latin Pronunciation: stim-yoo-LOH-suh

Meaning: From the Latin stimulus
Latin Pronunciation: stim-yoo-LOH-sum


stimulants

Herbal medicines that can increase the energy or activity of a tissue, organ, etc.

Meaning: From the Greek for fibre
Latin Pronunciation: STEE-pa
Alternative Self-Pronouncing:STY-pa


stipe

1. The stalk-like support of a pistil. 2. The petiole of a fern or palm frond. 3. The stalk supporting the fruiting body of some fungi.


stipel

A stipule of a leaflet.

Meaning: From the Latin stimulus
Latin Pronunciation: stim-yoo-LOH-sus

Meaning: With a stipe
Latin Pronunciation: stip-ee-TAY-tum
Alternative Self-Pronouncing:stip-ee-TAH-tum

Meaning: With a stipe
Latin Pronunciation: stip-ee-TAY-tuh
Alternative Self-Pronouncing:stip-ee-TAH-tuh

Meaning: Bearing stipules
Latin Pronunciation: stip-yoo-LAY-see-ah


stipitate

Having a stipe or short stem.


stipellate

Having stipels.

Meaning: With a stipe
Latin Pronunciation: stip-ee-TAY-tus
Alternative Self-Pronouncing:stip-ee-TAH-tus

Latin Pronunciation: stip-yew-/ay-see-us
Meaning: with

Meaning: Bearing stipules
Latin Pronunciation: stip-yoo-LAY-see-um

Latin Pronunciation: stip - yew - lay - riss
Meaning: with small organs (stipules) at leaf bases.

Meaning: With stipules
Latin Pronunciation: stip-yoo-LAY-tuh


stipular

Belonging to stipules.

Meaning: With stipules
Latin Pronunciation: stip-yoo-LAY-tum

Latin Pronunciation: stip-yew-lay-tus
Meaning: with stipules at leaf bases, often prominent.


stipule

An appendage at the base of a petiole, often appearing in pairs, one on each side, as found on roses.


stock plants

Mother plants kept for cuttings to reproduce the plant.


stipulate

Having stipules.

Meaning: Of the Stoechades (Iles d'Hyeres)
Latin Pronunciation: STOW-ka-dees

Meaning: With leaves like Lavender
Latin Pronunciation: sto-ee-ka-dee-FOH-lee-a

Meaning: With leaves like Lavender
Latin Pronunciation: sto-ee-ka-dee-FOH-lee-um


stipule scar

The scar left on a twig by the fall of a stipule.

Meaning: Of the Stoechades (Iles d'Hyeres)
Latin Pronunciation: STOW-kass

Meaning: With leaves like Lavender
Latin Pronunciation: sto-ee-ka-dee-FOH-lee-us


stock driveway

A lane; a strip of land designated for the movement of livestock.

Meaning: Named for Nikolai A. Stojanov, 20th century Bulgarian botanist and co-author of 'Flora of Bulgaria
Latin Pronunciation: stoy-uh-NOV-ee-eye

Meaning: (for English botanist Jona-than Stokes)
Latin Pronunciation: Stoh - keez - ee - uh
Common Name:Stokes Aster.

Meaning: Named for Thomas Pearson Stokoe, 20th century mountaineer and plant collector in South Africa
Latin Pronunciation: sto-KO-ee-eye

Meaning: Bearing runners
Latin Pronunciation: sto-lo-NIF-er-uh


stoloniferous stem

A slender creeping stem with minute leaves.


stoloniferous

Producing stolons.

Meaning: Bearing runners
Latin Pronunciation: sto-lo-NIF-er-um


stoloniform

Like a stolon, underground stem.

Latin Pronunciation: stoh-lon-nif-er-us
Meaning: producing runners that take root (stolons).


stoma (pl. stomata)

1. An orifice in the epidermis of a leaf communicating with internal air cavities. 2. A pore in the wall of a capsule surrounded by special guard- cells and serving the same purpose as the stomata in the epidermis of the leaves of flowering plants.


stone (alt. stone fruit)

The single seed of a drupe, surrounded by a large, hard shell and covered by pulp.


stone (alt. stone fruit)

The single seed of a drupe, surrounded by a large, hard shell and covered by pulp.

Meaning: From the Greek stoma (mouth)
Latin Pronunciation: sto-MAH-tee-um
Alternative Self-Pronouncing:sto-MAY-tee-um


stool

Clump of shoots growing from near the ground.


stove

A heated greenhouse.


stopping

Pinching off the terminal bud to induce branching.


storm surge

Before and during a storm, an abnormal and rapid rise in lake level along the shore, caused mostly by strong onshore winds and changes of atmospheric pressure.


stooling

Cutting down to ground level to induce tightly packed new growth.

Meaning: Lt. Richard Strachey, 19th century official within the Indian Civil Service and plant collector in Tibet
Latin Pronunciation: STRAK-ee-eye


straight

Describing ray florets having little or no curvature throughout their length (used in describing dahlias.)


straggling

Semiupright.


strain

A number of plants which have similar characteristics such as color blends, different enough to be designated, but not sufficiently distinct to be considered a horticultural variety.


stramineous

Straw-colored.

Meaning: Colour of straw
Latin Pronunciation: stram-IN-ee-um

Latin Pronunciation: stram-min-ee-us
Meaning: straw- colored.

Meaning: Colour of straw
Latin Pronunciation: stram-IN-ee-uh

Meaning: Spiked fruit
Latin Pronunciation: stra-MON-ee-um

Meaning: Spiked fruit
Latin Pronunciation: stra-MON-ee-uh

Meaning: Spiked fruit
Latin Pronunciation: stra-MON-ee-us


strand

1. The area of lakeshore above the waterline that is subject to the action of wind and rain. 2. On ocean beaches, the area between high and low tidal marks.

Latin Pronunciation: stran-gew-lay-tus
Meaning: constricted.

Meaning: (for English botanist Wil-liam Fox-Strangeways)
Latin Pronunciation: Stran-veez-ee-uh.

Meaning: From the Greek strateuma (band, company, or army)
Latin Pronunciation: strat-tee-MAT-ee-kuh


chemical stratification

A condition found in temperate lakes during the summer and winter stagnation periods in which certain horizontal layers become different chemically from adjacent ones, often causing turnover. See also: thermal stratification.


lithic context (syn. stratigraphic context)

The rock layers surrounding a fossil that allow the age of the fossil to be determined.


stratify (n. stratification)

Artificially overcoming a seed's dormancy by placing them in layers of moisture-retaining media and keeping them under generally cool and moist conditions for a period of time, so as to simulate winter conditions.


stratigraphy (adj. stratigraphic)

The study of layers of rock in reference to their ages.

Meaning: Soldier
Latin Pronunciation: stra-tee-OH-tees


stratified

Having prominent horizontal layers.


strawflowers

Species of plants which easily become dried flowers.


straw

The hollow stem of grass.

Meaning: (for Charlotte, Princess of Mecklenburg-Strelitz)
Latin Pronunciation: Strel - litt see-uh
Common Name: Bird-of-paradise Flower.

Meaning: From the Greek strepo (to make a noise)
Latin Pronunciation: STREP-enz

Meaning: From the Greek streptos (twisted) and anthos (flower)
Latin Pronunciation: strep-TAN-thus

Meaning: From the Greek stretpos (easily twisted or bent) and calyx (covering)
Latin Pronunciation: strep-toh-KAL-iks

Meaning: Little Streptocarpus, possibly referring to the smaller leaves of this sub genus
Latin Pronunciation: strep-toh-kar-PEL-uh

Meaning: Twisted fruit
Latin Pronunciation: strep-toh-KAR-pum

Meaning: Twisted fruit
Latin Pronunciation: strep-toh-KAR-puh

Latin Pronunciation: strep - toh - karp - us
Meaning: twisted-fruited.

Meaning: Twisted leaf
Latin Pronunciation: strep-toh-FIL-a

Meaning: From the Greek stretpos (easily twisted or bent) and lirion (lily)
Latin Pronunciation: strep-toh-LIR-ee-on

Meaning: (twisted-fruit)
Latin Pronunciation: Strep toh-karp-us
Common Name: Cape-primrose.
Meaning: (twisted-stalk, as to flower stalks)
Latin Pronunciation: Strep-top-us
Common Name: Twisted-stalk.

Latin Pronunciation: strop - toh -pet-al-us
Meaning: twisted petaled.

Latin Pronunciation: strep - toh - fill - us
Meaning: twisted-leaved.

Meaning: Twisted leaf
Latin Pronunciation: strep-toh-FIL-um

Latin Pronunciation: strep-toh-sep-al-us
Meaning: twisted-sepaled.

Meaning: Striped or fluted
Latin Pronunciation: stree-AH-tuh

Meaning: (twisted-tube, as to corolla)
Latin Pronunciation: Strep-toh-soh-len.

striate (syn. striated)

Marked with fine, longitudinal lines or ridges.


stria (pl. striae)

A thin ridge or groove.

Meaning: Somewhat (or faintly) striped
Latin Pronunciation: stree-AT-yew-luh
Alternative Self-Pronouncing:stry-AT-yew-luh

Meaning: Somewhat (or faintly) striped
Latin Pronunciation: stree-AT-yew-lum
Alternative Self-Pronouncing:stry-AT-yew-lum

Latin Pronunciation: strye-at-yew-lus
Meaning: faintly striped.

Latin Pronunciation: strye-ay-tus
Meaning: striped (striated).

Meaning: Striped or fluted
Latin Pronunciation: stree-AH-tum


strict

Very straight and upright.

Meaning: Erect, upright
Latin Pronunciation: STRIK-tuh

Latin Pronunciation: strik-tif-floh-rus
Meaning: erect- flowered.

Meaning: Very close, rigid, upright
Latin Pronunciation: STRIK-tee-or

Meaning: Erect, upright
Latin Pronunciation: STRIK-tum

Meaning: From the Latin word for bristle, as in mowed hay or row of cut grain
Latin Pronunciation: STRY-ga

Meaning: With bristles
Latin Pronunciation: strig-OH-suh

Latin Pronunciation: strikt-us
Meaning: upright, erect.

Meaning: With bristles
Latin Pronunciation: strig-OH-sum


strigose

Beset with appressed sharp straight and stiff hairs.

Latin Pronunciation: strye - jil - loh - sus
Meaning: with sharp hairs.

Meaning: Like a skin scraper (strigil knife) possibly referring to the bristles
Latin Pronunciation: strig-ill-OH-suh

Latin Pronunciation: strye-goh-sus
Meaning: covered with


string tags

Waterproof tags used to mark collected specimens for herbarium study.


strigulose

Minutely strigose.


striolated

With delicate lines or ridges.

Latin Pronunciation: strye-ol-lay-tus
Meaning: somewhat striped.


strip cropping

A method of planting a crop in parallel bands following the contours of the slope; this lessens erosion. See also: field strip cropping, filter strip.

Meaning: Cone-like
Latin Pronunciation: stroh-bil-uh-SEE-um

Meaning: Referring to pine cones
Latin Pronunciation: STROH-bee

Meaning: Cone-like
Latin Pronunciation: stroh-BIL-uh-say

Meaning: Cone-like
Latin Pronunciation: stroh-bil-uh-SEE-us

Meaning: Cone flower
Latin Pronunciation: stroh-bil-AN-theez

Latin Pronunciation: stroh-bil-/if-er-us
Meaning: bearing small cones (strobiles).

Meaning: From the Greek strobil, meaning cone-like shape
Latin Pronunciation: stroh-bil-IF-form-ee

Meaning: From the Greek strobil, meaning cone-like shape
Latin Pronunciation: stroh-bil-IF-form-iss

Meaning: From the Greek strobilos (cone)
Latin Pronunciation: stroh-bi-LIN-um

Meaning: From the Greek strobilos (cone)
Latin Pronunciation: stroh-bi-LIN-uh


strobilus (alt. strobile)

1. Woody cone, as in Gymnospermae. 2. A cone-shaped inflorescence marked by imbricated sporophylls. 3. A dense cone-like structure producing spores.


stroma

1. A compact mass of fungal hyphae producing perithecia or pycnidia. 2. The colorless proteinaceous matrix of a chloroplast in which the chlorophyll-containing lamellae are embedded.

Latin Pronunciation: stroh-bus
Meaning: specific name of White Pine.


strobiloid (alt. strobiliform)

Cone-shaped.

Meaning: From the Greek strongylos (round) and odontos (tooth), referring to the rounded teeth of the calyx
Latin Pronunciation: stron-GY-loh-don

Meaning: Bearing a turban or spiral, referring to the tightly coiled fruit
Latin Pronunciation: strom-buh-LEE-fer-a


Latin Pronunciation: Stroh-manth-ee.

strone (alt. stron)

A hill that terminates a ridge; the end of a ridge.

Meaning: From the Greek strophe (turning) and stulos (style)
Latin Pronunciation: stro-foh-STY-leez


strophile

An appendage at the hilum of certain seeds.


strophiole

Resulting from an inverted ovary that has fusion of the nucellus and funiculus. The strophiole is a small swelling on a ridge.

Meaning: Twisted cord flower
Latin Pronunciation: stroh-FAN-thus

Meaning: Swelling, tumor in reference to the seedpods
Latin Pronunciation: stroo-MAR-ee-um


struma

A goiter-like swelling on one side at the base of the capsule.

Meaning: Having tubercules
Latin Pronunciation: stroo-MOH-suh

Latin Pronunciation: strew-may-tus
Meaning: with tumors (or swellings).

Latin Pronunciation: strew-may-ree-us
Meaning: refer ring to tumors or ulcers.


strumose

Having a struma.

Meaning: Having tubercules
Latin Pronunciation: stroo-MOH-sum

Latin Pronunciation: strew-moh-sus
Meaning: with tumor like swellings.

Meaning: Named for John Stuart, 3rd Earl of Bute, 18th century British politician; a transcription error resulted in it being spelled Stewart
Latin Pronunciation: stew-ART-ee-uh

Meaning: Ostrich wing
Latin Pronunciation: struth-ee-OH-ter-is


stunt virus

A type of virus disease which stops the growth of a plant.

Meaning: Named for Captain Charles Napier Sturt, 19th century Indian-born British explorer of Australia
Latin Pronunciation: STURT-ee-eye

Meaning: Named for Captain Charles Napier Sturt, 19th century Indian-born British explorer of Australia
Latin Pronunciation: sturt-ee-AH-num

Meaning: Named for Captain Charles Napier Sturt, 19th century Indian-born British explorer of Australia
Latin Pronunciation: STURT-ee-a


stylar (alt. styled)

Either having styles or found on a style.


style

The usually attenuated portion of the pistil connecting the stigma and ovary.

Meaning: From the Greek stylos (column), referring to the united stamens and style
Latin Pronunciation: sty-LID-ee-um

Meaning: From the Greek styl (pillar or column) and is (equal), referring to the flowers
Latin Pronunciation: styl-IS-ma


stylar (alt. styled)

Either having styles or found on a style.

Meaning: From the Greek stylus (a style) and mekon (poppy), referring to the shape of the style
Latin Pronunciation: sty-LOH-mee-kon

Meaning: (style-bearing, as to long-lasting styles)
Latin Pronunciation: Stye - loff - or -urn
Common Name:Celandine-poppy.

Meaning: Carries styles
Latin Pronunciation: sty-loh-FOR-uh
Alternative Self-Pronouncing:sty-LOFF-or-uh

Meaning: Having styles
Latin Pronunciation: sty-LOH-suh

Meaning: Carries styles
Latin Pronunciation: sty-loh-FOR-us
Alternative Self-Pronouncing:sty-LOFF-or-us


stylopodium

A disc-shaped enlargement found at the base of the style in some Umbelliferae.

Meaning: From the Greek stylos (having styles) and anthos (flowers)
Latin Pronunciation: sty-lo-SAN-theez

Meaning: Having styles
Latin Pronunciation: sty-LOH-sum

Meaning: From Greek: stype (flax-fibre) and aner (man) in reference to the matted shaggy hairs on the distal parts of the staminal filaments
Latin Pronunciation: sty-PAN-dra

Latin Pronunciation: stye-loh-sus
Meaning: with prominent

Meaning: From the Greek, meaning dense; referring to the compact habit of some species
Latin Pronunciation: sty-FEE-lee-uh

Meaning: Flowing with gum
Latin Pronunciation: sty-rak-ee-FLOO-uh
Alternative Self-Pronouncing:sty-rak-IF-loo-uh

Meaning: Flowing with gum
Latin Pronunciation: sty-rak-ee-FLOO-us
Alternative Self-Pronouncing:sty-rak-IF-loo-us


styptic

A medicine to stop minor surface bleeding, e.g., razor cuts.

Meaning: Flowing with gum
Latin Pronunciation: sty-rak-ee-FLOO-um
Alternative Self-Pronouncing:sty-rak-IF-loo-um

Meaning: From the Arabic vernacular name for this plant
Latin Pronunciation: soo-AY-duh
Alternative Self-Pronouncing:soo-EE-duh

Latin Pronunciation: swav-vee-ol-enz
Meaning: pleasant (fragrance).

Meaning: Sweet
Latin Pronunciation: SWAH-vee

Latin Pronunciation: sway-viss
Meaning: pleasant, sweet.

Meaning: (for a kind of resin or gum)
Latin Pronunciation: Stye-rax
Common Name: Storax.

Latin Pronunciation: swav-viss-im-us
Meaning: very sweet (fragrance).

Meaning: Almost (but not quite) white
Latin Pronunciation: sub-AL-bee-kans

Meaning: A prefix meaning partially, almost, rather, becoming, or under
Latin Pronunciation: sub

Meaning: From lower mountain heights
Latin Pronunciation: sub-al-PY-nuh

Latin Pronunciation: sub-ak-kaw-liss
Meaning: nearly stemless.

Meaning: From lower mountain heights
Latin Pronunciation: sub-al-PY-num

Latin Pronunciation: sub-al-pye-nus
Meaning: nearly a true alpine.


subarctic

Of, relating to, or being the regions bordering on the arctic zone.

Meaning: Somewhat rough
Latin Pronunciation: sub-AS-per-uh

Meaning: Without much stem
Latin Pronunciation: sub-a-KAW-lee

Latin Pronunciation: sub-aw-rik-yew-lay tus
Meaning: inconspicuously "eared".

Meaning: Nearly two-flowers
Latin Pronunciation: sub-BIH-flor-uh
Alternative Self-Pronouncing:sub-bih-FLOR-uh

Meaning: Nearly two-flowers
Latin Pronunciation: sub-BIH-flor-us
Alternative Self-Pronouncing:sub-bih-FLOR-us

Meaning: Nearly two-flowers
Latin Pronunciation: sub-BIH-flor-um
Alternative Self-Pronouncing:sub-bih-FLOR-um

Meaning: Almost a head; somewhat with heads
Latin Pronunciation: sub-kap-ih-TAY-tuh

Meaning: Nearly blue
Latin Pronunciation: sub-see-ROO-lee-us

Meaning: Nearly blue
Latin Pronunciation: sub-see-ROO-lee-um

Meaning: Nearly blue
Latin Pronunciation: sub-see-ROO-lee-uh

Meaning: Almost a head; somewhat with heads
Latin Pronunciation: sub-kap-ih-TAY-tus

Meaning: Somewhat fleshy
Latin Pronunciation: sub-kar-NO-suh

Meaning: Almost a head; somewhat with heads
Latin Pronunciation: sub-kap-ih-TAY-tum

Meaning: Somewhat fleshy
Latin Pronunciation: sub-kar-NO-sum

Meaning: Somewhat hairy
Latin Pronunciation: sub-sil-ee-AY-tuh

Latin Pronunciation: sub-kar-noh-sus
Meaning: some what fleshy.

Meaning: Somewhat heart-shaped
Latin Pronunciation: sub-kor-DAH-tuh

Meaning: somewhat or partially notched
Latin Pronunciation: sub-kren-yoo-LAY-ta

Meaning: Somewhat hairy
Latin Pronunciation: sub-sil-ee-AY-tum

Meaning: Somewhat heart-shaped
Latin Pronunciation: sub-kor-DAH-tum

Latin Pronunciation: sub-kor-day-tus
Meaning: nearly heart-shaped.

Meaning: From the Greek sub (almost, somewhat) and distichus (two ranks)
Latin Pronunciation: sub-DIS-tih-kus


suberect

Ascending toward the edges.

Meaning: Somewhat upright
Latin Pronunciation: sub-er-EK-tuh

Latin Pronunciation: sub - ee - rek -tus
Meaning: nearly straight; rather erect.

Meaning: Latin name for Quercus
Latin Pronunciation: SOO-ber


suberin

A complex fatty substance found especially in the cell walls of cork.

Latin Pronunciation: sub-div-ar-ik-kay-tus
Meaning: slightly divergent.

Latin Pronunciation: sub - ee - den - tay - tus
Meaning: nearly toothless.


suberization (adj. suberized)

The conversion of the cell walls into corky tissue, called suberin.


suberization (adj. suberized)

The conversion of the cell walls into corky tissue, called suberin.

Meaning: Cork bark
Latin Pronunciation: sub-er-OH-suh

Meaning: Cork bark
Latin Pronunciation: sub-er-OH-sum

Latin Pronunciation: sub-fal-kay-tus
Meaning: somewhat sickle-shaped.


suberous

Cork-like.

Meaning: Less bound together; loosely bound
Latin Pronunciation: sub-fash-ee-AY-tuh

Latin Pronunciation: soo - ber - roh -sus
Meaning: cork- barked, corky.

Meaning: Becoming tube-like; nearly tube-like
Latin Pronunciation: sub-fist-yoo-LOW-suh

Meaning: From the Latin sub (under, below, or becoming) and flavus (yellow)
Latin Pronunciation: sub-FLAY-va

Meaning: From the Latin sub (under, below, or becoming) and flavus (yellow)
Latin Pronunciation: sub-FLAY-va

Meaning: Somewhat fan-like
Latin Pronunciation: sub-flab-el-LAY-tuh

Meaning: Almost paired; becoming paired
Latin Pronunciation: sub-jem-in-AY-tuh

Meaning: Almost paired; becoming paired
Latin Pronunciation: sub-jem-in-AY-tus

Meaning: Almost paired; becoming paired
Latin Pronunciation: sub-jem-in-AY-tum


subgenus

An intermediate category in taxonomy between genus and species.

Meaning: Having a small or slightly swollen hump
Latin Pronunciation: sub-gib-BOH-suh

Meaning: Almost hairless
Latin Pronunciation: sub-GLAY-ber

Meaning: Almost hairless
Latin Pronunciation: sub-GLAY-brum

Meaning: Somewhat bud-bearing
Latin Pronunciation: sub-jem-MIF-er-uh

Latin Pronunciation: sub-glaw-kus
Meaning: somewhat downy; bluish.

Meaning: Almost round
Latin Pronunciation: sub-glo-BOH-sum

Meaning: Almost hairless
Latin Pronunciation: sub-GLAY-bruh

Meaning: Somewhat spear-shaped
Latin Pronunciation: sub-hass-TAH-ta
Alternative Self-Pronouncing:sub-hass-TAY-ta

Meaning: Somewhat spear-shaped
Latin Pronunciation: sub-hass-TAH-tus
Alternative Self-Pronouncing:sub-hass-TAY-tus

Meaning: Almost round
Latin Pronunciation: sub-glo-BOH-suh

Meaning: Somewhat hairy
Latin Pronunciation: sub-hir-SOO-tuh

Meaning: Somewhat hairy
Latin Pronunciation: sub-hir-SOO-tus

Meaning: Somewhat spear-shaped
Latin Pronunciation: sub-hass-TAH-tum
Alternative Self-Pronouncing:sub-hass-TAY-tum

Meaning: Somewhat hairy
Latin Pronunciation: sub-HIR-tel-um

Meaning: Somewhat hair
Latin Pronunciation: sub-hir-SOO-tum

Latin Pronunciation: sub-her-tell-us
Meaning: somewhat hairy.


subimbricate

Somewhat overlapped; slightly shingled.

Meaning: Somewhat hairy
Latin Pronunciation: sub-HIR-tel-uh

Meaning: Somewhat unequal
Latin Pronunciation: sub-in-ee-KWA-liss

Meaning: Somewhat cut
Latin Pronunciation: sub-in-KY-suh
Alternative Self-Pronouncing:sub-in-SIGH-suh

Meaning: Somewhat cut
Latin Pronunciation: sub-in-KY-sum
Alternative Self-Pronouncing:sub-in-SIGH-sum

Meaning: Somewhat spineless; having fewer spines
Latin Pronunciation: sub-in-ERM-ee

Meaning: Somewhat spineless; having fewer spines
Latin Pronunciation: sub-in-ERM-iss

Meaning: Almost entire
Latin Pronunciation: sub-in-teg-er-REE-mum

Meaning: Almost entire
Latin Pronunciation: sub-in-TEG-ruh

Meaning: Somewhat unequal
Latin Pronunciation: sub-in-ee-KWA-lee

Meaning: Almost entire
Latin Pronunciation: sub-in-teg-er-REE-muh

Latin Pronunciation: sub-lew-nay-tus
Meaning: somewhat crescent-shaped.

Meaning: Somewhat (or becoming) nipple- or teat-like; also less frequently spelled submammilaris
Latin Pronunciation: sub-mam-mil-LAIR-iss

Meaning: Almost entire
Latin Pronunciation: sub-in-TEG-rum

Meaning: Small margins
Latin Pronunciation: sub-mar-gin-AY-tuh
Alternative Self-Pronouncing:sub-mar-jin-AH-tuh

Meaning: Having small nipples
Latin Pronunciation: sub-mam-yoo-LOH-suh

Meaning: Having small nipples
Latin Pronunciation: sub-mam-yoo-LOH-sus

Meaning: Small margins
Latin Pronunciation: sub-mar-gin-AY-tum
Alternative Self-Pronouncing:sub-mar-jin-AH-tum

Meaning: Under water
Latin Pronunciation: sub-MER-suh

Meaning: Small margins
Latin Pronunciation: sub-mar-gin-AY-tus
Alternative Self-Pronouncing:sub-mar-jin-AH-tus


submersed (alt. submerged)

Underwater.


submergent vegetation

Plants with stems and leaves below water level, sometimes with reproductive parts above water.


submersed (alt. submerged)

Underwater.

Meaning: Under water
Latin Pronunciation: sub-MER-sum

Latin Pronunciation: sub-mer-sus
Meaning: (growing) under water.

Meaning: Almost bare
Latin Pronunciation: sub-NOO-duh


subopposite

Almost opposite but one leaf or leaflet of each pair a little above the other.

Latin Pronunciation: sub-per-renn-iss
Meaning: almost perennial.

Meaning: Almost bare
Latin Pronunciation: sub-NOO-dum

Latin Pronunciation: sub-pet-ee-ol-lay-tus
Meaning: partially with petioles (leaf stalks).

Meaning: Somewhat rigid
Latin Pronunciation: sub-RIG-id-uh

Meaning: Less round; somewhat rounded
Latin Pronunciation: sub-roh-TUN-da

Meaning: Almost dwarf
Latin Pronunciation: sub-POO-mil-uh

Meaning: Somewhat rigid
Latin Pronunciation: sub-RIG-id-um

Meaning: Having somewhat rounded leaves
Latin Pronunciation: sub-ro-tun-dih-FOH-lee-uh

Meaning: Less round; somewhat rounded
Latin Pronunciation: sub-ro-TUN-dum

Meaning: Somewhat rigid
Latin Pronunciation: sub-RIG-id-us

Meaning: Less round; somewhat rounded
Latin Pronunciation: sub-ro-TUN-dus

Meaning: Less wrinkled
Latin Pronunciation: sub-roo-GOH-suh

Meaning: Having few scapes
Latin Pronunciation: sub-skay-POH-suh

Meaning: Having few scapes
Latin Pronunciation: sub-skay-POH-sum

Meaning: Less secund
Latin Pronunciation: sub-se-KUN-duh

Meaning: Having few scapes
Latin Pronunciation: sub-skay-POH-sus

Meaning: Partially serrated (toothed like a saw)
Latin Pronunciation: sub-ser-RAY-tuh

Meaning: Less secund
Latin Pronunciation: sub-se-KUN-dus

Meaning: Less secund
Latin Pronunciation: sub-se-KUN-dum

Meaning: Partially serrated (toothed like a saw)
Latin Pronunciation: sub-ser-RAY-tum

Meaning: From the prefix sub, signifying partially or almost; and sessile, from the Latin sessilis, meaning low or sitting; fixed
Latin Pronunciation: sub-SES-sile

Latin Pronunciation: sub - sess - iss
Meaning: nearly stalkless.

Meaning: Partially serrated (toothed like a saw)
Latin Pronunciation: sub-ser-RAY-tus


subshrub

A plant with more or less woody branches and roots, less woody than a true shrub, but more woody than a perennial herbaceous plant; a small shrub, woody only at the base.

Meaning: Somewhat bristly
Latin Pronunciation: sub-seh-TOH-sum

Meaning: Somewhat spiny
Latin Pronunciation: sub-spin-OH-suh

Meaning: Somewhat bristly
Latin Pronunciation: sub-seh-TOH-suh

Latin Pronunciation: sub-sin-yew-ay-tus
Meaning: somewhat wavy-margined.


subspecies (abr. ssp.)

The rank of taxa below species but above variety; a subdivision of a species whose members have certain hereditary characteristics distinct from other populations of that species. A subspecies is added to the specific binomial and preceded by "ssp.," such asobtusifolia in the epithetGrevillea thelemanniana ssp.obtusifolia.


substratum (syn. substrate)

The material on which a plant grows.


substratum (syn. substrate)

The material on which a plant grows.

Meaning: Underground
Latin Pronunciation: sub-ter-RAY-nee-uh


subtend

To be just below and close up to or enclosed in its axil.

Latin Pronunciation: sub - ter - ray - nee - us
Meaning: underground.

Meaning: Underground
Latin Pronunciation: sub-ter-RAY-nee-um

Meaning: Almost hairy
Latin Pronunciation: sub-toh-men-TOH-suh

Latin Pronunciation: sub-toh-men-toh-sus
Meaning: almost covered with hairs.


subterranean

Below ground.


subtropical (syn. semitropical)

Of, relating to, or being the regions bordering on the tropical zone.

Meaning: Awl-shaped
Latin Pronunciation: sub-yoo-LAH-tuh
Alternative Self-Pronouncing:sub-yoo-LAY-tuh

Meaning: Resembling subulata, species epithet meaning awl-shaped
Latin Pronunciation: sub-yoo-la-TOY-deez


subulate

Awl-shaped.

Meaning: Awl-shaped
Latin Pronunciation: sub-yoo-LAY-tum

Latin Pronunciation: sub - yew - lay - tus
Meaning: awl-shaped.

Meaning: Awl-shaped leaves
Latin Pronunciation: sub-yoo-lee-FOH-lee-um

Meaning: Somewhat velvety
Latin Pronunciation: sub-vel-U-tin-ah

Meaning: Awl-shaped leaves
Latin Pronunciation: sub-yoo-lee-FOH-lee-uh

Meaning: Awl-shaped leaves
Latin Pronunciation: sub-yoo-lee-FOH-lee-us

Meaning: Somewhat whorled
Latin Pronunciation: sub-ver-ti-sih-LAY-tuh

Meaning: Somewhat whorled
Latin Pronunciation: sub-ver-ti-sih-LAY-tum

Meaning: Somewhat (partially) clothed or dressed
Latin Pronunciation: sub-ves-TEE-tuh

Meaning: Somewhat (partially) clothed or dressed
Latin Pronunciation: sub-ves-TEE-tum

Latin Pronunciation: sub-vol-lew-bil-iss
Meaning: rather twining.


succession (syn. biotic succession)

1. The development of a plant community from its initial stage to its climax stage; usually from one consisting of grasses and forbs to one of shrubs and, finally, to forest. However, depending on the climate, the climax stage may consist of a prairie, savana, or any number of other ecosystems. 2. The changes in the species composition of communities following a natural or human disturbance like the natural filling of a pond or the clearing of a road through a forest.

Meaning: Somewhat (partially) clothed or dressed
Latin Pronunciation: sub-ves-TEE-tus

Meaning: Succulent, fleshy
Latin Pronunciation: suk-yoo-LEN-tuh

Meaning: (cut off below, as to root appearance)
Latin Pronunciation: Suk-sye-suh.

succulent

A plant having fleshy stems or leaves, often adapted to xeric conditions.

Meaning: Succulent, fleshy
Latin Pronunciation: suk-yoo-LEN-tum


sucker

A shoot from the root or lower part of a stem. In roses, a young cane emerging below the bud union and therefore representing the variety of the understock rather than the top variety. A shoot appearing on a tree limb is called a water sprout.

Latin Pronunciation: suk-kew-lent-us
Meaning: fleshy, succulent.

Meaning: Of or from Sweden
Latin Pronunciation: soo-EH-seh-kuh

Latin Pronunciation: swess-ik-us
Meaning: of Sweden. '

Latin Pronunciation: suf-frew-tess-senz
Meaning: becoming shrubby, shrub-like.

Meaning: Of or from Sweden
Latin Pronunciation: soo-EH-seh-kum


suffrutescent

Slightly or obscurely shrubby.

Meaning: Somewhat shrubby
Latin Pronunciation: suf-roo-TEE-ko-suh


suffrutex

Subshrub.

Meaning: Somewhat shrubby
Latin Pronunciation: suf-roo-TEE-ko-sum

Meaning: From the Latin, meaning propped (up) or supported
Latin Pronunciation: suf-FUL-ta

Latin Pronunciation: suf-frew-tik-koh-sus
Meaning: rather shrubby.


suffruticose

Very low and woody; diminutively shrubby.

Meaning: From the Latin, meaning propped (up) or supported
Latin Pronunciation: suf-FUL-tum

Meaning: From the Latin, meaning propped (up) or supported
Latin Pronunciation: suf-FUL-tus


sulcate

Grooved or furrowed.

Meaning: Furrowed
Latin Pronunciation: sul-KAY-tum

Meaning: Sulphur yellow
Latin Pronunciation: sul-FER-ee-uh

Meaning: Named for William Starling Sullivant, 19th century American botanist
Latin Pronunciation: sul-lih-VANT-ee-eye

Meaning: From the Latin sulcus (furrowed) and Rebutia (genus named for Pierre Rebut, 19th century French cactus dealer and expert)
Latin Pronunciation: sul-koh-ray-BEW-tee-uh

Meaning: Furrowed
Latin Pronunciation: sul-KAY-tuh

Latin Pronunciation: sul-kay-tus
Meaning: furrowed.

Latin Pronunciation: sul-few-ree-us
Meaning: yellow.

Meaning: Sulphur yellow
Latin Pronunciation: sul-FER-ee-um

Meaning: Named for Sultan Seyyid Majid, 19th century Sultan of Zanzibar
Latin Pronunciation: sul-TAN-ee-eye

Meaning: Named for Sultan Seyyid Majid, 19th century Sultan of Zanzibar
Latin Pronunciation: sul-TAN-ee

Meaning: Of or from Sumatra
Latin Pronunciation: soo-MAH-truh-nuh
Alternative Self-Pronouncing:soo-muh-TRAH-nuh

Latin Pronunciation: soo-mat-tray-nus
Meaning: of Sumatra.


summer wood

Wood produced late in the growing season when growth is slow.


sunken garden

A garden recessed into the ground to create a secluded atmosphere or to facilitate a view down onto a feature such as a knot garden.

Latin Pronunciation: soo-perb-us
Meaning: very showy.


super- (alt. supra-)

A prefix meaning above, greater than, superior to.

Meaning: Superb
Latin Pronunciation: soo-PER-bum

Meaning: Eyebrow-like
Latin Pronunciation: soo-per-sil-ee-AIR-ee

Latin Pronunciation: soo-per-sil-ee-ay-riss
Meaning: eyebrow-like.

Meaning: Superb
Latin Pronunciation: soo-PER-buh


superior ovary

With the flower parts growing from below the ovary.


superparasitism

Parasitization of a host by more than one individual, usually of a single species.


superphosphate

A fertilizer with a very high amount of phosphates, uusally 30-45 percent, and most often used to promote flowering in ornamental plants.


superposed

Accessory buds which occur above the axillary buds.


superficial

On the surface.


supersaturation

The uptake of unusual amounts of water by a plant; this can cause plant specimens to mold rather than dry.


supersporangium

A structure containing tetrasporangia and acting as a sporangium.

Meaning: Prostrate
Latin Pronunciation: sup-EE-num


supra-axillary

Borne above the axil.

Meaning: Prostrate
Latin Pronunciation: sup-EE-nus


suprabasal

Above the base, usually referring to pinnae or pinnules.

Meaning: Prostrate
Latin Pronunciation: sup-EE-nuh


supramedial

Beyond the middle.

Meaning: From the Surat Thani province of Thailand
Latin Pronunciation: sur-rat-EN-see
Alternative Self-Pronouncing:sur-rat-EN-say

Meaning: From the Surat Thani province of Thailand
Latin Pronunciation: sur-rat-EN-sis

Latin Pronunciation: sur-kew-loh-sus
Meaning: producing suckers.

Meaning: Named for Francois Joseph Donat Surian, 17th century French physician botanist who accompanied Plumier and others on expeditions
Latin Pronunciation: ser-ree-AY-nuh


surculose

Producing suckers.


surface drainage

Grading or piping that allows excess water to be carried away by gravity.


surcurrent

Extending upward on and adnate to an axis.

Latin Pronunciation: sur-in-am-men-siss
Meaning: of Surinam (Dutch Guiana).

Meaning: Named for Susanna (or Suzanna) Muir, wife of John Muir, 19th century Scottish born American naturalist and explorer; also spelled suzannae
Latin Pronunciation: soo-SAN-ay-ee

Meaning: From Susa, an ancient capital city of the Elamite, Persian and Parthian empires. Today the city belongs to the Khuzestan province of Iran.
Latin Pronunciation: suh-SEE-ah-nus

Meaning: Of or from Suriname (Surinam), South America
Latin Pronunciation: sur-ih-nam-EN-see


suspended

Describes an ovule that is hanging from the apex of the cell.

Latin Pronunciation: sus-pen-sus
Meaning: hanging suspended.

Meaning: Hanging or doubtful
Latin Pronunciation: sus-PEN-sum

Meaning: Hanging or doubtful
Latin Pronunciation: sus-PEN-suh


sustainability

The capability of entities to survive without human intervention.


sustainable development

Human intervention that meets the needs and aspirations of the current generation without compromising the ability to meet those of future generations.


Latin Pronunciation: Sutherland-ee-uh.

Meaning: From the Indonesian name for silk
Latin Pronunciation: SOO-ter-uh

Meaning: Named for Dr. Peter Sutherland, who discovered the species in the 1800s
Latin Pronunciation: suth-er-LAN-dee-eye


suture

A line of dehiscence.

Meaning: Named for Rev. Charles Sutton, 19th century English clergyman and amateur botanist
Latin Pronunciation: sut-TOH-nee-uh

Meaning: (for its cultivator James
Meaning: (for English horticulturist Isaac Swainson)
Latin Pronunciation: Swain-soh-nuh.

Meaning: Named for Jason Richard Swallen, early 20th century botanist with the US Department of Agriculture
Latin Pronunciation: swal-LEN-ee-a


swale

A wet depression between beach ridges, fed by ground water and runoff, rarely influenced by changes in water level.

Meaning: Of or from Swartburg (South Africa)
Latin Pronunciation: swart-berg-EN-see

Meaning: Named for Jason Richard Swallen, early 20th century botanist with the US Department of Agriculture
Latin Pronunciation: swal-LEN-ee-eye

Meaning: Named for Jason Richard Swallen, early 20th century botanist with the US Department of Agriculture
Latin Pronunciation: swal-len-ee-AY-na


swash

A body of splashing dashing water, sometimes referring to the water carried up the slope of a shore by the breaking waves. In the united States, this term means the narrow sound or channel lying between a sandbank and the shore.


swash zone

The shore area above the waterline, dovered and uncovered by uprushing water.

Meaning: From the Royal Kingdom of Swaziland, South Africa
Latin Pronunciation: SWAZ-ih-kuh

Meaning: Variant of susannae; named for Susanna (or Suzanna) Muir, wife of John Muir, 19th century Scottish born American naturalist and explorer
Latin Pronunciation: soo-SAN-ay-ee

Meaning: Of or from Swartburg (South Africa)
Latin Pronunciation: swart-berg-EN-sis


swash marks

Concentrated debris above the waterline and parallel to it, covered and uncovered by uprushing waters.

Meaning: From the Royal Kingdom of Swaziland, South Africa
Latin Pronunciation: SWAZ-ih-kum


sweating

The process of placing plant specimens in a plant press for 24-48 hours, then opening the press. Moisture will have been drawn out of the plant into the driers but plant parts will still be pliable enough to make final arrangements of parts.


swell

A huge natural dome structure where movement of the earth's crust has raised stratigraphic layers in mounds rather than breaking them with a fault. Erosion exposes the oldest layers in the middle with subsequent layers surrounding it in concentric circles.

Meaning: From the Royal Kingdom of Swaziland, South Africa
Latin Pronunciation: SWAZ-ih-kus


sweepstakes bridge

The accidental transport of organisms across a barrier, usually where no land connection exists, e.g., the migration of plants and animals to Krakatoa by air and water after all life was eliminated there by volcanic eruption.

Meaning: Named for Emanual Sweert, 16th century Dutch botanist, artist and author
Latin Pronunciation: SWER-tee-uh


swidden

A temporary agricultural plot produced by cutting back and burning the current plant life.


swelling clay

A soil with little sand which shrinks when dry and swells when wet. This recurring problem usually strips bark from roots of woody plants, so the area favors grasses and other nonwoody species.

Meaning: named for Gerard van Swieten, 18th century Dutch botanist and physician to the Empress Maria Theresa
Latin Pronunciation: swee-TEEN-ee-uh


swoe

A type of scuffle hoe.

Meaning: Charles Francis Massy Swynnerton, early 20th century British entomologist who collected in Mozambique
Latin Pronunciation: swin-er-TON-ee-eye

Meaning: Possibly named for a 5th century Roman leader
Latin Pronunciation: sy-AG-russ

Meaning: From the Greek sykomoros (derived from sykon, fig; and moron, black mulberry)
Latin Pronunciation: sik-oh-MOR-uh


syconium (pl. syconia)

A fleshy, multiple fruit having a hollow center, like that of a fig.


sylvan (alt., sylvatic)

Of, or relating to, a forest or woods.

Meaning: From the Greek sykomoros (derived from sykon, fig; and moron, black mulberry)
Latin Pronunciation: sik-oh-MOR-us

Meaning: Of the forest
Latin Pronunciation: sil-VAT-ee-kuh

Meaning: From the Greek sykon (fig) and opsis (resembling)
Latin Pronunciation: sy-KOP-sis

Meaning: Of the forest
Latin Pronunciation: sil-VAT-ee-kum

Meaning: Of the woods, growing wild
Latin Pronunciation: sil-VESS-tree

Meaning: Variant form of silvestrii, named for Filippo Silvestri, 19th century Italian entomologist and zoologist
Latin Pronunciation: sil-VEST-ree

Latin Pronunciation: sil-vess-triss
Meaning: of woods and forests.

Latin Pronunciation: sil-vik-ol-us
Meaning: growing in woods.

Latin Pronunciation: sil-vat-ik-us
Meaning: of the forests.

Meaning: Inhabitant of woods
Latin Pronunciation: sil-VEE-koh-luh
Alternative Self-Pronouncing:sil-VY-koh-luh

Meaning: Of the woods, growing wild
Latin Pronunciation: sil-VESS-ter


symbiosis (adj. symbiotic)

The living together of different species of organism which may or may not be to their mutual benefit. See also: mutualism, parasitism.


symbiosis (adj. symbiotic)

The living together of different species of organism which may or may not be to their mutual benefit. See also: mutualism, parasitism.

Meaning: From the Greek summetria (proportion)
Latin Pronunciation: sim-MET-ree-ka

Meaning: From the Greek summetria (proportion)
Latin Pronunciation: sim-MET-ree-kus


sympetalous

Gamopetalous; with petals joined at the margins or at the base, often forming a tube or funnel.

Meaning: From the Greek summetria (proportion)
Latin Pronunciation: sim-MET-ree-kum


symmetrical

Describes a flower that can be divided into similar halves.


sympatric

Describes two or more closely-related species having coincident or overlapping ranges of distribution but not interbreeding. See also: allopatric.

Meaning: (for growing-together an thers)
Latin Pronunciation: Sim-fee-and-ruh.
Meaning: (for growing-together fruit)
Latin Pronunciation: Sim-ploh-karp-us
Common Name: Skunk-cabbage.
Meaning: (accompanying - fruit, as to fruit in clusters)
Latin Pronunciation: Sim-for-ik karp-os.

Meaning: From the Greek symphio (growing together) and andros (man), referring to the conjoined anthers
Latin Pronunciation: sim-fee-AN-druh

Meaning: From the Greek symphyos, (growing together) and thrix (hair), referring to the hair-like flowers
Latin Pronunciation: sim-fy-oh-TRY-kum

Meaning: (grow-together, perhaps a reference to wound-healing properties)
Latin Pronunciation: Sim-fit-um
Common Name: Comfrey.

Meaning: From the Greek symploke (combination) and karpos (fruit), referring to the way the ovaries grow together to form fruit
Latin Pronunciation: sim-plo-KAR-pus


sympodial

A specialized growth pattern in which the terminal bud dies--or blows in an inflorescence--with growth continuing by development of more or less equal side branches. See also: monopodial.

Meaning: (interconnected, as to base of stamens)
Latin Pronunciation: Sim-ploh-kos
Common Name: Sweet- leaf.

sympodium (pl. sympodia, adj. sympodial)

A primary axis without a single, persistent growing point that develops from a series of lateral branches which change direction in succession and give it a zigzag form, as occurs with orchids of the genusCattleya. See also: monopodium.


synandrium

With the androecium having the anthers connate.

Meaning: From the Greek syn (together) and aden (gland), referring to the united glands of the inflorescence
Latin Pronunciation: sin-a-DEE-nee-um


synantherous

Describes a plant which leafs out and flowers at the same time.


synanthous

Refers to leaves which open at the same time as the flowers. See also: precocious, hysteranthous.


syncarp

An aggregate or multiple fruit produced from fused or coherent pistils, the small individual fruits massing and growing together into a single fruit, coalescent.

Meaning: From the Greek syn (together) and karphos (chaff)
Latin Pronunciation: sin-KAR-fuh


synangium

An oblong group of fused sporangia.

Meaning: From the Greek syn (with, together) and karpos (fruit), referring to the joined fruit that hardens into capsules
Latin Pronunciation: sin-KAR-pee-uh


syncarpous

With the carpels of the gynoecium united in a compound ovary.


synflorescence

A compound inflorescence composed of both terminal and lateral flowering branches.


syncline

A geological structure that appears when strata fold downward toward a common line.


synergid

One of two small cells lying near the micropyle of the embryo sac of an angiosperm.

Meaning: From the Greek syngonos (joined together) and anthos (flower)
Latin Pronunciation: sin-gon-ANTH-us


syngenesia (adj. syngenesious)

Plants with the anthers fused, forming a ring around the style, e.g., Compositae.


synoicous (alt. synaecious)

Having the male and the female organs mixed together in the same cluster.


synsepalous

Gamosepalous; with sepals joined at their margins.

Meaning: From the Greek syn (with, together) and gon? (womb), referring to the united ovaries
Latin Pronunciation: sin-GO-nee-um

Meaning: From the Greek syn (together, with) and sepalum (sepal)
Latin Pronunciation: sin-SEP-al-uh


synonomy

Historical listing of all the names applied by different authors to a plant.

Meaning: From the Greek syn (together) and nema (thread0, referring to the united stamens
Latin Pronunciation: sin-NE-muh


synonym (abr. syn.)

Any one of two or more names used for the same taxon rank; a rejected name due to misapplication or difference in taxonomic judgment. See also: basionym, homonym, tautonym, autonym, taxonomic synonym, nomenclatural synonym.


syntype

Any one of two or more specimens cited by the author when no holotype was designated, or when two or more were designated. See also: holotype, lectotype, neotype, isotype, nomenclatural type, topotype.

Meaning: (together-valve, as to a join-ing of the fruit capsules)
Latin Pronunciation: Sinth-uh-riss.

Meaning: From the Greek syn (together, with) and sepalum (sepal)
Latin Pronunciation: sin-SEP-al-lum

Latin Pronunciation: sif-il-lit-ik-us
Meaning: presumably once supposed to be a remedy for syphilis.

Meaning: Of or from Syria
Latin Pronunciation: seer-ee-AK-uh

Meaning: Of or from Syria
Latin Pronunciation: seer-ee-AK-um

Latin Pronunciation: sihr-rye-ak-us
Meaning: of Syria.


Latin Pronunciation: Sihr-rin-guh
Common Name: Lilac.

Latin Pronunciation: sihr-in-ganth-us
Meaning: Lilac (Syringa) -flowered.

Meaning: Sand-dweller
Latin Pronunciation: ser-TI-koh-luh


systematics

The study of the evolutionary and genetic relationships among organisms and of their phenotype similarities and differences.

Meaning: Having flowers like Syringa (genus name for Lilac)
Latin Pronunciation: sy-rin-GAN-tha


systemic

Anything introduced into the growth system of a plant and traveling throughout the system. Some types of systemics are used to protect plants, as a systemic insecticide. Other systemics are used as herbicides to kill plants deemed as noxious weeds.

Latin Pronunciation: siss-stye-lus
Meaning: with joined styles.


systilius

The lid continuing fixed to the columella, and thus elevated above the capsule when dry.

Meaning: From the Greek syzygos (joined), referring to the paired leaves
Latin Pronunciation: siz-ZY-gee-um


systemics

Scientific study of the kinds and diversity of organisms and of the relationships between them.

Meaning: From Szechuan (China)
Latin Pronunciation: se-chwan-EE-kuh

Meaning: Named for Johann Nepomuk Szovits, 19th century Hungarian apothecary and plant collector in the Caucasus
Latin Pronunciation: szo-vit-see-AH-nuh
Alternative Self-Pronouncing:szo-vit-see-AY-nuh

Meaning: Named for Johann Nepomuk Szovits, 19th century Hungarian apothecary and plant collector in the Caucasus
Latin Pronunciation: szo-vit-see-AH-num
Alternative Self-Pronouncing:szo-vit-see-AY-num