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Aglaonema costatum
( Malaysian Evergreen )

This perennial creeps and reaches 30 inches tall and about as wide. Leaves are 8 inches long, dark green with white midribs, spotted, and oval shaped. Flowers resemble small greenish-white callas followed by yellow to red berries. Grown primarily for the foliage. This easy-care house plant prefers loose, rich potting soil and plenty of water, though it can survive just fine with very little. This plant is a wonderful choice if low light seems to be your problem. Mixes well with other houseplants, too. Occasionally, this "houseplant" is used outside in warm, tropical areas as a foundation planting on shady, north sides. Even if you live in cooler areas, consider grouping this and other favorite houseplants outside for the summer, giving a refreshing tropical look to the patio or terrace.


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Characteristics
Cultivar: n/a  
Family: Araceae  
Size: Height: 0 ft. to 2.5 ft.
Width: 0 ft. to 2.5 ft.  
Plant Category: houseplants, perennials,  
Plant Characteristics: low maintenance, spreading,  
Foliage Characteristics: evergreen,  
Foliage Color: dark green, silver to cream, variegated,  
Flower Characteristics:  
Flower Color:  
Tolerances:  
Requirements
Bloomtime Range: not applicable  
USDA Hardiness Zone: undefined  
AHS Heat Zone: Not defined for this plant  
Light Range: Part Shade to Part Sun  
pH Range: 5.5 to 6.5  
Soil Range: Potting Soil to Potting Soil  
Water Range: Normal to Moist  

Plant Care



Fertilizing
How-to : Fertilizing Houseplants

Houseplants may be fertilized with: 1. water-soluble, quick release fertilizers; 2. temperature controlled slow-release fertilizers; 3. or organic fertilizers such as fish emulsion. Water soluble fertilizers are used every two weeks or per label instructions. Controlled, slow-release fertilizers are carefully worked into the soil usually only once during the growing season or per label directions. For organic fertilizers, such as fish emulsion, follow label directions. Allow houseplants to 'rest' during the winter months; stop fertilizing in late October and resume feeding in late February.

Light
Conditions : Moderate Light for Houseplants

Place houseplants that require moderate light within 5 feet of an eastern or western exposure window.

Watering
Conditions : Normal Watering for Houseplants

Houseplants that require normal watering should be watered so that soil is completely saturated and excess water runs out the bottom of the pot. Never water just a little bit; this allows mineral salts to build up in the soil. The key to normal watering is to allow the top inch or two of potting soil to dry out between waterings. Check frequently as certain times of the year may dictate that you water more frequently. Also, some plants that require normal watering during the growing season, may require less during the winter months when they are dormant.

Planting
Problems
Pest : Mealybugs

Small, wingless, dull-white, soft-bodied insects that produce a waxy powdery covering. They have piercing/sucking mouth parts that suck the sap out of plant tissue. Mealybugs often look like small pieces of cotton and they tend to congregate where leaves and stems branch. They attack a wide range of plants. The young tend to move around until they find a suitable feeding spot, then they hang out in colonies and feed. Mealybugs can weaken a plant leading to yellow foliage and leaf drop. They also produce a sweet substance called honeydew (coveted by ants) which can lead to an unattractive black surface fungal growth called sooty mold.

Prevention and Control: Isolate infested plants from those that are not. Consult your local garden center professional or the Cooperative Extension office in your county for a legal insecticide/chemical recommendation. Encourage natural enemies such as lady beetles in the garden to help reduce population levels of mealy bugs.

Fungi : Leaf Spots

Leaf spots are caused by fungi or bacteria. Brown or black spots and patches may be either ragged or circular, with a water soaked or yellow-edged appearance. Insects, rain, dirty garden tools, or even people can help its spread.

Prevention and Control: Remove infected leaves when the plant is dry. Leaves that collect around the base of the plant should be raked up and disposed of. Avoid overhead irrigation if possible; water should be directed at soil level. For fungal leaf spots, use a recommended fungicide according to label directions.



Pest : Scale Insects

Scales are insects, related to mealy bugs, that can be a problem on a wide variety of plants - indoor and outdoor. Young scales crawl until they find a good feeding site. The adult females then lose their legs and remain on a spot protected by its hard shell layer. They appear as bumps, often on the lower sides of leaves. They have piercing mouth parts that suck the sap out of plant tissue. Scales can weaken a plant leading to yellow foliage and leaf drop. They also produce a sweet substance called honeydew (coveted by ants) which can lead to an unattractive black surface fungal growth called sooty mold.

Prevention and Control: Once established they are hard to control. Isolate infested plants away from those that are not infested. Consult your local garden center professional or Cooperative Extension office in your county for a legal recommendation regarding their control. Encourage natural enemies such as parasitic wasps in the garden.

Miscellaneous
Glossary : Rhizome

A thickened modified stem that grows horizontally along or under the soil surface. It may be long and slender, as in some lawn grasses, or thick and fleshy, as with rhubarb.

Glossary : Container Plant

A plant that is considered to be a good container plant is one that does not have a tap root, but rather a more confined, fibrous root system. Plants that usually thrive in containers are slow- growing or relatively small in size. Plants are more adaptable than people give them credit for. Even large growing plants can be used in containers when they are very young, transplanted to the ground when older. Many woody ornamentals make wonderful container plants as well as annuals, perennials, vegetables, herbs, and bulbs.

Glossary : Evergreen

Evergreen refers to plants that hold onto their leaves or needles for more than one growing season, shedding them over time. Some plants such as live oaks are evergreen, but commonly shed the majority of their older leaves around the end of January.

Glossary : Perennial

Perennial: traditionally a non-woody plant that lives for two or more growing seasons.

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