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Nymphaea
( Marliacea Albida Hardy Waterlily )

This is a hardy Water Lily with dark green, rounded leaves 9 inches across. Foliage is bronzed when young. Flowers are fragrant, white with yellow stamens, 5 to 6 inches across. Best grown in undisturbed waters with full sun. Height varies with water depth. Commonly referred to as "Water Lilies" these plants have adapted to living in a total water environment. The leaves of these plants are individually supported on leaf stalks called petioles. Water Lily blossoms vary greatly in color and size. They enjoy neutral to alkaline water and grow best in full sun. Planting should be done in water no cooler than 75 degrees F. If the water is too cool the plant will enter a dormant state. The following planting times correspond to each hardiness zone; for Zone 4 plant in mid to late June, Zone 5 plant in early to mid June, Zone 6 plant in late May to early June, Zone 7 plant mid to late May, Zone 8 plant in mid April, Zone 9 plant in early April and for Zone 10 plant March through April.
Important Info : Also known as N.'Albida'.


How to Grow this Plant:


Where can you buy this plant: click here!

Characteristics
Cultivar:Marliacea Albida  
Family:Nymphaeaceae  
Size:Height: 0 ft. to 0 ft.
Width: 3 ft. to 4 ft.  
Plant Category:aquatic plants, landscape,  
Plant Characteristics: 
Foliage Characteristics:deciduous,  
Foliage Color:green,  
Flower Characteristics:fragrant, showy,  
Flower Color:whites,  
Tolerances: 
Requirements
Bloomtime Range:Mid Summer to Late Summer  
USDA Hardiness Zone:4 to 11  
AHS Heat Zone:Not defined for this plant  
Light Range:Sun to Full Sun  
pH Range:7 to 8.5  
Soil Range:Sand to Clay  
Water Range:Wet to Wet  

Plant Care



Fertilizing
How-to : Fertilization for Young Plants

Young plants need extra phosphorus to encourage good root development. Look for a fertilizer that has phosphorus, P, in it(the second number on the bag.) Apply recommended amount for plant per label directions in the soil at time of planting or at least during the first growing season.

How-to : Fertilization for Established Plants

Established plants can benefit from fertilization. Take a visual inventory of your landscape. Trees need to be fertilized every few years. Shrubs and other plants in the landscape can be fertilized yearly. A soil test can determine existing nutrient levels in the soil. If one or more nutrients is low, a specific instead of an all-purpose fertilizer may be required. Fertilizers that are high in N, nitrogen, will promote green leafy growth. Excess nitrogen in the soil can cause excessive vegetative growth on plants at the expense of flower bud development. It is best to avoid fertilizing late in the growing season. Applications made at that time can force lush, vegetative growth that will not have a chance to harden off before the onset of cold weather.

Light
Conditions : Sun

Sun is defined as the continuous, direct, exposure to 6 hours (or more) of sunlight per day.

Conditions : Full Sun

Full Sun is defined as exposure to more than 6 hours of continuous, direct sun per day.

Watering
Conditions : Wet

Wet is defined as year-round standing water, such as a concave area of the ground or pond.

Planting
Problems
Pest : Aphids

Aphids are small, soft-bodied, slow-moving insects that suck fluids from plants. Aphids come in many colors, ranging from green to brown to black, and they may have wings. They attack a wide range of plant species causing stunting, deformed leaves and buds. They can transmit harmful plant viruses with their piercing/sucking mouthparts. Aphids, generally, are merely a nuisance, since it takes many of them to cause serious plant damage. However aphids do produce a sweet substance called honeydew (coveted by ants) which can lead to an unattractive black surface growth called sooty mold.

Aphids can increase quickly in numbers and each female can produce up to 250 live nymphs in the course of a month without mating. Aphids often appear when the environment changes - spring & fall. They're often massed at the tips of branches feeding on succulent tissue. Aphids are attracted to the color yellow and will often hitchhike on yellow clothing.

Prevention and Control: Keep weeds to an absolute minimum, especially around desirable plants. On edibles, wash off infected area of plant. Lady bugs and lacewings will feed on aphids in the garden. There are various products - organic and inorganic - that can be used to control aphids. Seek the recommendation of a professional and follow all label procedures to a tee.

Fungi : Leaf Spots

Leaf spots are caused by fungi or bacteria. Brown or black spots and patches may be either ragged or circular, with a water soaked or yellow-edged appearance. Insects, rain, dirty garden tools, or even people can help its spread.

Prevention and Control: Remove infected leaves when the plant is dry. Leaves that collect around the base of the plant should be raked up and disposed of. Avoid overhead irrigation if possible; water should be directed at soil level. For fungal leaf spots, use a recommended fungicide according to label directions.



Miscellaneous
Glossary : Rhizome

A thickened modified stem that grows horizontally along or under the soil surface. It may be long and slender, as in some lawn grasses, or thick and fleshy, as with rhubarb.

Glossary : Aquatic

An aquatic is any plant that is grown in water, whether as a floater or rooted in wet soil.

Glossary : Deciduous

Deciduous refers to those plants that lose their leaves or needles at the end of the growing season.

Glossary : pH

pH, means the potential of Hydrogen, is the measure of alkalinity or acidity. In horticulture, pH refers to the pH of soil. The scale measures from 0, most acid, to 14, most alkaline. Seven is neutral. Most plants prefer a range between 5.5 and about 6.7, an acid range, but there are plenty of other plants that like soil more alkaline, or above 7. A pH of 7 is where the plant can most easily absorb the most nutrients in the soil. Some plants prefer more or less of certain nutrients, and therefore do better at a certain pH.

Glossary : Water Plants

Water plants, often called aquatics, thrive when roots are submerged in water or when soil is boggy or constantly wet. Water level will vary depending on the individual plant. Some aquatics thrive in deep water and actually float on the surface, while others are better suited to swampy margins. Know the care and culture of the plants you are using. Some water plants, such as tropical water lilies, may not be hardy where frost is present and should be stored for the winter, while others, such as iris will do just fine.

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