Contact  |  Forums
Google Plant Images

Musa
( Banana )

There are roughly 40 species of bananas, all tropical in nature, but a few that can make it through a mild winter in USDA hardiness zone 7. Fruit is edible, leaves are large and ovate. Grow in full sun where soil is fertile and well drained.


How to Grow this Plant:


Where can you buy this plant:
click here!

Characteristics
Cultivar: n/a  
Family: Musaceae  
Size: Height: 6 ft. to 30 ft.
Width: 6 ft. to 15 ft.  
Plant Category: trees,  
Plant Characteristics: low maintenance,  
Foliage Characteristics: coarse leaves, deciduous, evergreen,  
Foliage Color: blue-green to gold, dark green, green, red to burgundy, variegated,  
Flower Characteristics: unusual,  
Flower Color: creams, whites, yellows,  
Tolerances: heat & humidity,  
Requirements
Bloomtime Range: Mid Spring to Late Spring  
USDA Hardiness Zone: 7 to 11  
AHS Heat Zone: Not defined for this plant  
Light Range: Sun to Full Sun  
pH Range: 6.5 to 7.5  
Soil Range: Mostly Sand to Some Clay  
Water Range: Normal to Moist  

Plant Care



Fertilizing
Light
Conditions : Dappled Light

Dappled Light refers to a dappled pattern of light created on the ground, as cast by light passing through high tree branches. This is the middle ground, not considered shady, but not sunny either. Dappled remains constant throughout the day.

Conditions : Full Sun

Full Sun is defined as exposure to more than 6 hours of continuous, direct sun per day.

Watering
Planting
How-to : Planting a Tree

Dig out an area for the tree that is about 3 or 4 times the diameter of the container or rootball and the same depth as the container or rootball. Use a pitchfork or shovel to scarify the sides of the hole.

If container-grown, lay the tree on its side and remove the container. Loosen the roots around the edges without breaking up the root ball too much. Position tree in center of hole so that the best side faces forward. You are ready to begin filling in with soil.

If planting a balled and burlaped tree, position it in hole so that the best side faces forward. Untie or remove nails from burlap at top of ball and pull burlap back, so it does not stick out of hole when soil is replaced. Synthetic burlap should be removed as it will not decompose like natural burlap. Larger trees often come in wire baskets. Plant as you would a b&b plant, but cut as much of the wire away as possible without actually removing the basket. Chances are, you would do more damage to the rootball by removing the basket. Simply cut away wires to leave several large openings for roots.

Fill both holes with soil the same way. Never amend with less than half original soil. Recent studies show that if your soil is loose enough, you are better off adding little or no soil amendments.

Create a water ring around the outer edge of the hole. Not only will this conseve water, but will direct moisture to perimeter roots, encouraging outer growth. Once tree is established, water ring may be leveled. Studies show that mulched trees grow faster than those unmulched, so add a 3"" layer of pinestraw, compost, or pulverized bark over backfilled area. Remove any damaged limbs.

Problems
Miscellaneous
Plant Images






Free Garden Catalog



 

gardeninggardening






privacy policy