Gardening is Good for Your Health and Here’s Why

Purple Phlox and daylily

When life gets stressful, it can be helpful to turn to a productive hobby. Taking care of your plants is a perfect outlet for anxiety. Through nurturing another life and using your pent-up energy into creating something beautiful, you can take charge of the situation. Check out these scientifically-proven benefits of gardening and taking care of plants.

Plants Improve the Environment

Through purifying the air and eliminating pollutants, plants can provide you with a healthy environment that’s fantastic for your health.   Mental and physical health are intimately linked. So, when you’re feeling better, you are in a clearer headspace.

Improves Your Mental Health

According to research, people who do activities outside in nature have better mental health and generally, a more positive mindset. On top of that, it’s been shown that people who cultivate plants live less stressful lives. In addition, one study found that indoor plants at homes or businesses can improve your mood and make you more focused.

Plants give you an opportunity to implement a new routine in your life. Though there’s a negative association with chores, in fact, there are plenty of positive benefits. For instance, having a regular routine has been linked to decreased levels of stress, improved sleep, and better overall health. Especially if you just moved to a new city, started a new relationship, or left an old job, you can use a regular routine to keep you grounded. Here are some things you need to regularly do to tend to your plants:

  • Water Them: While some plants need more water than others, chances are you need to regularly water them for them to live.
  • Check Leaves:  Any plant owner can tell you that you have to pay close attention to early signs of decay and be attentive. For instance, if the leaves are yellow around the edges, that means you need to be watering less.
  • Manage Soil: Another crucial thing to keep up with is your plant’s soil’s nutritional levels.
  • Go To Store: When your plant grows or you need new fertilizer, you will have to go to the local nursery or store to get supplies.

Boosts Your Memory

One study found that being around plants at home or at work can actually boost your attention span by 20% and sharpen your ability to concentrate and another study suggests that just the presence of plants can make you more productive.

Workplace stress is a widespread problem. Though it’s a multi-faceted issue, improving your performance at work can subsequently help you feel more at ease with your job. If you move with confidence, you will be able to tackle more of your challenges. Who knows? You may even finally get that promotion!

While plants can potentially help with your mental health, it’s important to keep all options on the table.  If you are going through a tough time, look into signing up for online therapy. You can get the help you need from the comfort of your home and speak to licensed professionals that can assist with taking charge of your mental health.

Make You More Creative

In addition to making you more productive and increasing your attention, plants have been shown to make you more creative. Having a creative outlet can decrease blood pressure and cortisol – the stress hormone. There are numerous ways to incorporate your plant into a creative practice!  Take a look at these few ideas:

  • Painting: You can spend a relaxing afternoon painting a rendering of your plant. There are infinite styles and possibilities!
  • Drawing: Take a sketchpad and draw your plants and their surroundings. Over time, you can collect them all in a book.
  • Singing: A lot of people enjoy singing to their plants. You don’t have to have an operatic range, all you have to do is know how to have fun! 

Even if your job isn’t in a creative field, having a more creative mindset can help you work through challenges and overcome obstacles.

It Can Positively Benefit Your Relationships

There are numerous ways plants can improve your relationships. For one, having a plant can introduce you to a myriad of new people. Isolation can take a serious toll on your mental health. Unfortunately, it’s become increasingly hard to meet new people. Especially with the pandemic, we are all feeling a bit more alone. However, getting a plant can be what you need to get yourself back out there. Here are some ways that plants can make you more social:

  • Exchange Tips: There’s a whole community out there of plant lovers who are ready and eager to share tips with you. On social media, reach out to other plant lovers and ask for advice.
  • Go To Nurseries With Friends: Once you get the hang of taking care of a couple of plants, you will be eager to have some more. Reach out to friends or family members who also have a green thumb and visit a nursery together. For the rest of the time, your plants will bring fond memories!
  • Plant Trees: If you really love gardening, you can build off that hobby and plant trees with friends and family. Planting trees is fantastic for the environment and a great way to be out in the sun and enjoying nature.

In addition to helping you meet new people, gardening can also teach you some valuable things about relationships. Check these out:

  • Patience: Blossoms don’t happen overnight! With plants, you need to learn how to wait and not rush things or you can risk inflicting some serious damage. With your relationships, you have to be patient as well and meet people where they are.
  • Consideration: Though some plants are low maintenance, others require attention to details. Similarly with people, you need to watch out for the little things to make it work.
  • Care:  No matter what’s happening, you have to care for your plant. This can provide a valuable lesson for the consistency of relationships.

Gardening can make you happy in a myriad of ways. If you’re considering getting into it, it’s never too late!

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